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  1. Sex-Selective Abortion: A Relational Approach.Gail Weiss - 1995 - Hypatia 10 (1):202-217.
    A critical application of Ruddick's model of maternal thinking is the best way to grapple with the ethical dilemmas posed by sex- selective abortion which I view as a "moral mistake." Chief among these is the need to be sensitive to local cultural practices in countries where sex- selective abortion is prevalent, while simultaneously developing consistent international standards to deal with the dangers posed by the use of sex- selective abortion to eliminate female fetuses.
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  • “I'm Not the One They're Sticking the Needle Into”: Latino Couples, Fetal Diagnosis, and the Discourse of Reproductive Rights.H. Mabel Preloran, C. H. Browner & Susan Markens - 2003 - Gender and Society 17 (3):462-481.
    Despite the growing routinization of prenatal diagnosis, little research has examined men's roles in this reproductive arena or these technologies' possibilities for reinforcing or transforming gender roles and relations. The authors analyze male partners' participation in the amniocentesis decisions of Mexican-origin women at high risk for problems, drawing on interviews with 157 women and 120 of their male partners. The primary aim is to explore whether the normalization of prenatal testing poses a threat to women's autonomy in this decision arena. (...)
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  • Anticipating Infertility: Egg Freezing, Genetic Preservation, and Risk.Lauren Jade Martin - 2010 - Gender and Society 24 (4):526-545.
    This article discusses the new reproductive technology of egg freezing in the context of existing literature on gender, medicalization, and infertility. What is unique about this technology is its use by women who are not currently infertile but who may anticipate a future diagnosis. This circumstance gives rise to a new ontological category of “anticipated infertility.” The author draws on participant observation and a qualitative analysis of scientific, mainstream, and marketing literature to identify and compare the representation of two different (...)
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  • Separate, but Less Unequal:: Fetal Ultrasonography and the Transformation of Expectant Mother/Fatherhood.Margarete Sandelowski - 1994 - Gender and Society 8 (2):230-245.
    Fetal ultrasonography has made women's and men's relationship to the fetus more equal. Drawing on information obtained from multiple conjoint interviews with 62 childbearing couples, I suggest that although women and men are both advantaged by fetal ultrasonography, expectant fathers' experience of the fetus is always enhanced, whereas pregnant women's experience may also be attenuated. For men, fetal ultrasonography is like a prosthetic device: an enabling mechanism that permits them access to a female world from which they have been excluded (...)
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