Switch to: References

Citations of:

Domains of recollection

Psychological Review 89 (6):708-729 (1982)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Construction of Subjective Experience: Memory Attributions.Clarence M. Kelley & Larry L. Jacoby - 1990 - Mind and Language 5 (1):49-68.
  • Memory and Time.Jordi Fernandez - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 141 (3):333 - 356.
    The purpose of this essay is to clarify the notion of mnemonic content. Memories have content. However, it is not clear whether memories are about past events in the world, past states of our own minds, or some combination of those two elements. I suggest that any proposal about mnemonic content should help us understand why events are presented to us in memory as being in the past. I discuss three proposals about mnemonic content and, eventually, I put forward a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Context Effects in Recognition Memory: The Role of Familiarity and Recollection.W. McKenzie - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):20-38.
    A variant of the process dissociation procedure was coupled with a manipulation of response signal lag to assess whether manipulations of context affect one or both of the familiarity and search processes described by the dual process model of recognition. Participants studied a list of word pairs followed by a recognition test with target words presented in the same or different context, and in the same or different form as study . Participants were asked to recognize any target word regardless (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Memory, Past and Self.Jordi Fernández - 2008 - Synthese 160 (1):103 - 121.
    The purpose of this essay is to determine how we should construe the content of memories. First, I distinguish two features of memory that a construal of mnemic content should respect. These are the ‘attribution of pastness’ feature (a subject is inclined to believe of those events that she remembers that they happened in the past) and the ‘attribution of existence’ feature (a subject is inclined to believe that she existed at the time that those events that she remembers took (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Test Anxiety and Implicit Memory.J. H. Mueller, M. J. Elser & D. N. Rollack - 1993 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (6):531-533.
  • The Quantity, Not the Quality, of Affect Predicts Memory Vividness.Daniel Reisberg, Friderike Heuer, John Mclean & Mark O’Shaughnessy - 1988 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (2):100-103.
  • Relations Among Components and Processes of Memory.Endel Tulving - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):257.
  • Memory: Two Systems or One System with Many Subsystems?G. Wolters - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):256.
  • Just How Does Ecphory Work?Guy Tiberghien - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):255.
  • Recognition and Recall: The Direct Comparison Experiment.Hidetsugu Tajika - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):254.
  • The Ontogeny of Episodic and Semantic Memory.John G. Seamon - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):254.
  • Does Current Evidence From Dissociation Experiments Favor the Episodic/Semantic Distinction?Henry L. Roediger - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):252.
  • On Falsifying the Synergistic Ecphory Model.Jeroen G. W. Raaijmakers - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):251.
  • Comparative Analysis of Episodic Memory.David S. Olton - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):250.
  • The Source of the Long-Term Retention of Priming Effects.Nobuo Ohta - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):249.
  • Bridging Gaps Between Concepts Through GAPS.Lars-Göran Nilsson - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):248.
  • The Episodic/Semantic Distinction: Something Worth Arguing About.John Morton & D. A. Bekerian - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):247.
  • Inference and Temporal Coding in Episodic Memory.Robert N. McCauley - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):246.
  • Recoding Processes in Memory.Elizabeth F. Loftus & Jonathan W. Schooler - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):246.
  • The Episodic/Semantic Continuum in an Evolved Machine.Roy Lachman & Mary J. Naus - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):244.
  • Armchair Theorists Have More Fun.Roberta L. Klatzky - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):244.
  • A Fact is a Fact is a Fact.John F. Kihlstrom - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):243.
  • Analyzing Recognition and Recall.Gregory V. Jones - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):242.
  • Factual Memory?William Hirst - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):241.
  • Episodic Versus Semantic Memory: A Distinction Whose Time has Come – and Gone?Douglas L. Hintzman - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):240.
  • There is More Going on in the Human Mind.Géry D'Ydewalle & Rudi Peeters - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):239.
  • Neuropsychological Evidence and the Semantic/Episodic Distinction.Alan D. Baddeley - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):238.
  • Précis of Elements of Episodic Memory.Endel Tulving - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (2):223.
  • Representation of Unattended Material in Memory.Yaakov Hoffman & Joseph Tzelgov - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1504-1508.
    The current study addresses how information whose processing was not part of task requirement is represented in memory. Using a novel measure, recognition memory for unattended material was assessed twice, once when it appeared with the same attended study target and once with a new target. The data reveal memory for unattended study information only in the old target condition. Results suggest that the entire study event is encoded and represented in a memory trace, which contains both attended target information (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Memory for Phobia-Related Words in Spider Phobics.Fraser N. Watts & Tim Dalgleish - 1991 - Cognition and Emotion 5 (4):313-329.