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Pride and Prejudice

Oxford World's Classics (1813)

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  1. Educating Virtue as a Mastery of Language.Sophia Vasalou - 2012 - The Journal of Ethics 16 (1):67-87.
    That only those who have mastered language can be virtuous is something that may strike us as an obvious truism. It would seem to follow naturally from, indeed simply restate, a view that is far more commonly held and expressed by philosophers of the virtues, namely that only those who can reason can be virtuous properly said. My aim in this paper is to draw attention to this truism and argue its importance. In doing so, I will take the starting (...)
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  • Proper Names and Their Fictional Uses.Heidi Tiedke - 2011 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (4):707 - 726.
    Fictional names present unique challenges for semantic theories of proper names, challenges strong enough to warrant an account of names different from the standard treatment. The theory developed in this paper is motivated by a puzzle that depends on four assumptions: our intuitive assessment of the truth values of certain sentences, the most straightforward treatment of their syntactic structure, semantic compositionality, and metaphysical scruples strong enough to rule out fictional entities, at least. It is shown that these four assumptions, taken (...)
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  • “If Some People Looked Like Elephants and Others Like Cats”: Wittgenstein on Understanding Others and Forms of Life.Constantine Sandis - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4:131-153.
    This essay introduces a tension between the public Wittgenstein’s optimism about knowledge of other minds and the private Wittgenstein’s pessimism about understanding others. There are three related reasons which render the tension unproblematic. First, the barriers he sought to destroy were metaphysical ones, whereas those he struggled to overcome were psychological. Second, Wittgenstein’s official view is chiefly about knowledge while the unofficial one is about understanding. Last, Wittgenstein’s official remarks on understanding themselves fall into two distinct categories that don’t match (...)
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  • Odd Complaints and Doubtful Conditions: Norms of Hypochondria in Jane Austen and Catherine Belling.James Lindemann Nelson - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (2):193-200.
    In her final fragmentary novel Sanditon, Jane Austen develops a theme that pervades her work from her juvenilia onward: illness, and in particular, illness imagined, invented, or self-inflicted. While the “invention of odd complaints” is characteristically a token of folly or weakness throughout her writing, in this last work imagined illness is also both a symbol and a cause of how selves and societies degenerate. In the shifting world of Sanditon, hypochondria is the lubricant for a society bent on turning (...)
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  • Guidelines for author.B. M. - 2019 - Scientia et Fides 7 (2):247-252.
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  • Barbara Thayer‐Bacon on Knowers and the Known.Jim McKenzie - 2002 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (3):301–319.
  • Barbara Thayer‐Bacon on Knowers and the Known.Jim McKenzie - 2002 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (3):301-319.
  • Unreliability and Point of View in Filmic Narration.Emar Maier - 2022 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 59 (2):23-37.
    Novels like Fight Club or American Psycho are said to be instances of unreliable narration: the first person narrator presents an evidently distorted picture of the fictional world. The film adaptations of these novels are likewise said to involve unreliable narration. I resist this extension of the term ‘unreliable narration’ to film. My argument for this rests on the observation that unreliable narration requires a personal narrator while film typically involves an impersonal narrator. The kind of ambiguous story-telling that we (...)
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  • Silence and Responsibility.Ishani Maitra - 2004 - Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):189–208.
    In this paper, I shall be concerned with the phenomenon that has been labeled silencing in some of the recent philosophical literature. A speaker who is silenced in this sense is unable to make herself understood, even though her audience hears every word she utters. For instance, consider a woman who says “No”, intending to refuse sex. Her audience fails to recognize her intention to refuse, because he thinks that women tend to be insincere, and to not say what they (...)
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  • Multiversionality: Considering multiple possibilities in the processing of narratives.Ben Hiskes, Milo Hicks, Samuel Evola, Cameron Kincaid & Fritz Breithaupt - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-26.
    This paper proposes a conceptual framework of multiversional narrative processing, or multiversionality. Multiversionality is the consideration of multiple possible event sequences for an incomplete narrative during reception, from reading a novel to listening to the story of a friend’s day. It occurs naturally and is experienced in a wide range of cases, such as suspense, surprise, counterfactuals, and detective stories. Receiving a narrative, we propose, is characterized by the spontaneous creation of competing interpretive models of the narrative that are then (...)
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  • Guidelines for Authors.- -- - 2017 - Scientia et Fides 5 (2):305.
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  • Guidelines for Authors.[author unknown] - 2017 - Scientia et Fides 5 (1):313-318.
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  • Guidelines for Authors.[author unknown] - 2016 - Scientia et Fides 4 (2):533-538.
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  • Guidelines for Authors.[author unknown] - 2016 - Scientia et Fides 4 (1):321-326.
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  • Guidelines for Authors.[author unknown] - 2018 - Scientia et Fides 6 (1):339-344.
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  • From Oeconomy to `the Economy': Population and Self-Interest in Discourses on Government.Ann Firth - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (3):19-35.
    The emergence of population as an object of government in the 18th century produced a new problematic of government. The focus of this new problematic was how to ensure that the pursuit of self-interest by individual economic actors was compatible with the reproduction and useful employment of the population. From the 18th century to the present, government in the West has addressed this problem in a number of different ways, each of which represents a 'tricky adjust ment' between a liberal (...)
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  • Discursive Injustice: The Role of Uptake.Claudia Bianchi - 2020 - Topoi 40 (1):181-190.
    In recent times, phenomena of conversational asymmetry have become a lively object of study for linguists, philosophers of language and moral philosophers—under various labels: illocutionary disablement and silencing, discursive injustice :440–457, 2014; Lance and Kukla in Ethics 123:456–478, 2013), illocutionary distortion. The common idea is that members of underprivileged groups sometimes have trouble performing particular speech acts that they are entitled to perform: in certain contexts, their performative potential is somehow undermined, and their capacity to do things with words is (...)
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  • Ruin and Restitution.Sigrid Beck, Luka Crnic & Thilo Götz - 2008 - Natural Language Semantics 16 (2):111-114.
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  • The Emotional Mind: The Affective Roots of Culture and Cognition.Stephen Asma & Rami Gabriel - 2019 - Harvard University Press.
    Tracing the leading role of emotions in the evolution of the mind, a philosopher and a psychologist pair up to reveal how thought and culture owe less to our faculty for reason than to our capacity to feel. Many accounts of the human mind concentrate on the brain’s computational power. Yet, in evolutionary terms, rational cognition emerged only the day before yesterday. For nearly 200 million years before humans developed a capacity to reason, the emotional centers of the brain were (...)
  • Fiction.Fred Kroon - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • What is Social Hierarchy?Han van Wietmarschen - forthcoming - Noûs.
    Under which conditions are social relationships hierarchical, and under which conditions are they not? This article has three main aims. First, I will explain what this question amounts to by providing a more detailed description of the general phenomenon of social hierarchy. Second, I will provide an account of what social hierarchy is. Third, I will provide some considerations in favour of this account by discussing how it improves upon three alternative ways of thinking about social hierarchy that are sometimes (...)
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  • Pluralists About Pluralism? Versions of Explanatory Pluralism in Psychiatry.Jeroen Van Bouwel - 2014 - In M. C. Galavotti, D. Dieks, W. J. Gonzalez, S. Hartmann, Th Uebel & M. Weber (eds.), New Directions in Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective Series). Springer. pp. 105-119.
    In this contribution, I comment on Raffaella Campaner’s defense of explanatory pluralism in psychiatry (in this volume). In her paper, Campaner focuses primarily on explanatory pluralism in contrast to explanatory reductionism. Furthermore, she distinguishes between pluralists who consider pluralism to be a temporary state on the one hand and pluralists who consider it to be a persisting state on the other hand. I suggest that it would be helpful to distinguish more than those two versions of pluralism – different understandings (...)
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  • The Esoteric Quine? Belief Attribution and the Significance of the Indeterminacy Thesis in Quine’s Kant Lectures.H. G. Callaway - 2003 - In W.V. Quine, Wissenschaft und Empfindung. Frommann-Holzboog.
    This is the Introduction to my translation of Quine's Kant Lectures. Part of my interpretation is that an "esoteric doctrine" in involved in Quine's distinctive semantic claims: his skepticism of the credulity of non-expert evaluation of discourse and theory.
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  • Against the Neoliberal Blackmail.Christopher William Wolter & Alicia Barrena - 2019 - International Journal of Žižek Studies 13 (2).
    Žižek’s recent commentaries on the topics of gender identity, sexuality, and consent have provoked outraged reactions from the politically correct neoliberal consensus. This paper argues these reactions emerge in part due to Žižek & Zupančič’s recent explorations into the ontological and political ramifications of Lacan’s thesis ‘ il n'y a pas de rapport sexuel’. Specifically, these explorations pose a threat to the contemporary definition of the subject as the subject of trauma, and the economy of moralistic outrage which sustains this (...)
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