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  1. Comparison of Sports Habits and Attitudes in University Students of Physical and Sports Education of Mostaganem (Algeria) and Physical Activity and Sport Sciences of León.Marta Zubiaur, Abdelkader Zitouni & Saray Del Horno - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    BackgroundIn their professional practice, teachers can exert a strong influence on students, promoting healthy habits for life through the example of their own lifestyle. The aim of this study was to compare sports habits and attitudes in Physical Activity and Sports Education students at the universities of León and Mostaganem.MethodsWe administered the “Motivations and Attitudes Toward Physical Activity and Sports” questionnaire to 125 Algerian university students from the Institute for Physical Education and Sport and 122 Spanish university students from the (...)
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  • Neural Oscillations Associated With Auditory Duration Maintenance in Working Memory in Tasks With Controlled Difficulty.Xiaolin Yu, Youguo Chen, Ting Luo & Xiting Huang - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Experimental Subjects and Partial Truth Telling During Technological Change in Radiotherapy.Lisa Anne Wood - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (4):441-451.
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  • Moral Injury and the Need to Carry Out Ethically Responsible Research.Victoria Williamson, Dominic Murphy, Carl Castro, Eric Vermetten, Rakesh Jetly & Neil Greenberg - 2020 - Research Ethics 17 (2):135-142.
    The need for research to advance scientific understanding must be balanced with ensuring the rights and wellbeing of participants are safeguarded, with some research topics posing more ethical quandaries for researchers than others. Moral injury is one such topic. Exposure to potentially morally injurious experiences can lead to significant distress, including post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, and selfinjury. In this article, we discuss how the rapid expansion of research in the field of moral injury could threaten the wellbeing, dignity and integrity (...)
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  • Must Research Benefit Human Subjects If It is to Be Permissible?Daniel Wikler - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (2):114-117.
  • Improving the Helsinki Declaration's Guidance on Research in Incompetent Subjects.Anna Eva Westra & Inez de Beaufort - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):278-280.
    Research involving children or other incompetent subjects who are deemed unable to provide informed consent is complex, particularly in the case of research that does not directly benefit the research subjects themselves. The Helsinki Declaration, the World Medical Association's landmark document for research ethics, therefore states that incompetent research subjects must not be included in such research unless it entails only minimal risk and minimal burden. In this paper, we argue that now that research in these groups is expected to (...)
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  • Ambiguous Articles in New EU Regulation May Lead to Exploitation of Vulnerable Research Subjects.Anna Eva Westra - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (3):189-191.
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  • Why is Coerced Consent Worse Than No Consent and Deceived Consent?David Wendler & Alan Wertheimer - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (2):114-131.
    The Standard View in research ethics maintains that, under certain conditions, investigators may deceive subjects and may enroll subjects without their consent. In contrast, it is always impermissible to coerce subjects to enroll, even when the same conditions are satisfied. This view raises a question that, as far as we are aware, has received no attention in the literature. Why is it always impermissible to undermine the validity of subjects’ consent through coercion, but it can be permissible to undermine the (...)
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  • What We Worry About When We Worry About the Ethics of Clinical Research.David Wendler - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):161-180.
    Clinical research is thought to be ethically problematic and is subject to extensive regulation and oversight. Despite frequent endorsement of this view, there has been almost no systematic evaluation of why clinical research might be ethically problematic. As a result, it is difficult to determine whether the regulations to which clinical research is subject address the ethical concerns it raises. Commentators who consider this question at all tend to assume that clinical research is ethically problematic because it exposes some individuals (...)
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  • Should Protections for Research with Humans Who Cannot Consent Apply to Research with Nonhuman Primates?David Wendler - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (2):157-173.
    Research studies and interventions sometimes offer potential benefits to subjects that compensate for the risks they face. Other studies and interventions, which I refer to as “nonbeneficial” research, do not offer subjects a compensating potential for benefit. These studies and interventions have the potential to exploit subjects for the benefit of others, a concern that is especially acute when investigators enroll individuals who are unable to give informed consent. US regulations for research with human subjects attempt to address this concern (...)
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  • Involving Communities in Deciding What Benefits They Receive in Multinational Research.David Wendler & Seema Shah - 2015 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 40 (5):584-600.
    There is wide agreement that communities in lower-income countries should benefit when they participate in multinational research. Debate now focuses on how and to what extent these communities should benefit. This debate has identified compelling reasons to reject the claim that whatever benefits a community agrees to accept are necessarily fair. Yet, those who conduct clinical research may conclude from this rejection that there is no reason to involve communities in the process of deciding how they benefit. Against this possibility, (...)
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  • In Defense of a Social Value Requirement for Clinical Research.David Wendler & Annette Rid - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (2):77-86.
    Many guidelines and commentators endorse the view that clinical research is ethically acceptable only when it has social value, in the sense of collecting data which might be used to improve health. A version of this social value requirement is included in the Declaration of Helsinki and the Nuremberg Code, and is codified in many national research regulations. At the same time, there have been no systematic analyses of why social value is an ethical requirement for clinical research. Recognizing this (...)
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  • The Forum.Charles Weijer, Fern Brunger, Simon Shimshon Rubin, Ruth Macklin, Michael A. Grodin, Sondra Crosby & Susan Douglas Kelley - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (4):371-387.
  • Refuting the Net Risks Test: A Response to Wendler and Miller's "Assessing Research Risks Systematically".Charles Weijer & Paul B. Miller - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):487-490.
    Earlier in the pages of this journal (p 481), Wendler and Miller offered the "net risks test" as an alternative approach to the ethical analysis of benefits and harms in research. They have been vocal critics of the dominant view of benefit-harm analysis in research ethics, which encompasses core concepts of duty of care, clinical equipoise and component analysis. They had been challenged to come up with a viable alternative to component analysis which meets five criteria. The alternative must (1) (...)
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  • Payments and Direct Benefits in HIV/AIDS Related Research Projects in Uganda.Julius Ecuru, Douglas Wassenaar & Betty Kwagala - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (2):95-109.
    Paying research participants in developing countries like Uganda raises ethical concerns over potential for undue inducement. This article, based on an exploratory study, reviewed 49 research protocols from a national HIV/AIDS research ethics committee database. Payments mainly adhered to the reimbursement and compensation payment models. Offers made were diverse but basic in order to limit undue inducement. Implications in terms of undue inducement and possible impact on participants and research are discussed. We end by recommending standardization across comparable studies in (...)
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  • Someone Is Watching You: The Ethics of Covert Observation to Explore Adult Behaviour at Children’s Sporting Events.Simon R. Walters & Rosemary Godbold - 2014 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (4):531-537.
    Concerns have been expressed about adult behaviour at children’s sporting events in New Zealand. As a consequence, covert observation was identified as the optimal research method to be used in studies designed to record the nature and prevalence of adult sideline behaviour at children’s team sporting events. This paper explores whether the concerns raised by the ethics committee about the use of this controversial method, particularly in relation to the lack of informed consent, the use of deception, and researcher safety, (...)
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  • Ethical Concerns Regarding Operations by Volunteer Surgeons on Vulnerable Patient Groups: The Case of Women with Obstetric Fistulas. [REVIEW]L. Lewis Wall - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (2):115-127.
    By their very nature, overseas medical missions (and even domestic medical charities such as free clinics ) are designed to serve vulnerable populations. If these groups were capable of protecting their own interests, they would not need the help of medical volunteers: their medical needs would be met through existing government health programs or by utilizing their own resources. Medical volunteerism thus seems like an unfettered good: a charitable activity provided by well-meaning doctors and nurses who want to give of (...)
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  • Legislative Regulation and Ethical Governance of Medical Research in Different European Union Countries.Piret Veerus, Joel Lexchin & Elina Hemminki - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (6):409-413.
    Objective To obtain information about the similarities and differences in regulating different types of medical research in the European Union .Methods Web searches were performed from September 2009 to January 2011. Notes on pre-determined topics were systematically taken down from the web pages. The analysis relied only on documents and reports available on the web, reflecting the situation at the end of 2010.Results In several countries, regulatory legislation applied only to clinical trials on drugs and medical devices, in other states (...)
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  • Neonatal Pain Relief and the Helsinki Declaration.Robert S. Van Howe & J. Steven Svoboda - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):803-823.
    The Helsinki Declaration, first published in 1964, is the universally accepted standard for ethical behavior in research involving human subjects. The Declaration was formulated in response to the abuses of human subjects by the scientists in Nazi Germany and to update the Nuremberg Code. Amended in 1975, 1983, 1989, 1996, and 2000, the Declaration provides the foundation for the United States federal regulations for research involving human subjects.To conform to standards developed in the Declaration, a researcher must fulfill the following: (...)
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  • Leaving Users in the Dark: A Call to Define Responsibilities Toward Users of Neural Implanted Devices.Odile C. Van Stuijvenberg, Annelien L. Bredenoord, Marike L. D. Broekman & Karin R. Jongsma - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 13 (4):233-236.
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  • A Pharmaceutical Bioethics Consultation Service: Six-Year Descriptive Characteristics and Results of a Feedback Survey.Luann E. Van Campen, Albert J. Allen, Susan B. Watson & Donald G. Therasse - 2015 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 6 (2):53-62.
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  • On the Wrongness of Exploitation and the Voluntariness of Consent in Clinical Research on Opioid Assisted Treatment.Susanne Uusitalo - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):44-45.
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  • I Thought We Were in This Together?Howard Trachtman - 2002 - American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):30 – 31.
  • Research Ethics Should Be Taught as Part of the NSW Higher School Certificate Curriculum.Natasha Todorov - 2021 - Research Ethics 17 (1):66-72.
    The Higher School Certificate is a certificate that recognises the successful completion of secondary education in New South Wales, Australia. The most recent enrolment information available suggests that at least 13,472 students undertaking the NSW Higher School Certificate in 2019 conducted research projects that involved human participants. During the course of their high school education current HSC students are taught research design principles and statistics so that they are equipped to plan a research project and determine the meaning of the (...)
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  • Enhancing the Ethical Conduct of a Longitudinal Cluster-Randomized Trial of Psychosocial Stimulation Intervention for Children with Complicated Severe Acute Malnutrition Through Rapid Ethical Assessment: A Qualitative Study.Tesfalem T. Tessema, Andamlak G. Alamdo, Eyoel B. Mekonnen, Fanna A. Debele, Juhar A. Bamud, Teklu G. Abessa & Tefera Belachew Lema - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-13.
    Background Informed consent is a universally accepted precondition for scientific researches involving human participants. However, various factors influence the process of obtaining authentic informed consent, and researchers particularly working in resource-poor countries often face considerable difficulties in implementing the universally recommended procedures for obtaining informed consent. We have conducted this Rapid Ethical Assessment to accommodate the local cultural norms and to understand the relevant ethical issues in the Silti community before the conduct of a cluster-randomized controlled trial. Methods This REA (...)
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  • Matching Values to Technology: A Value Sensitive Design Approach to Identify Values and Use Cases of an Assistive System for People with Dementia in Institutional Care.Stefan J. Teipel, Antonia Kowe, Doreen Görß & Stefanie Köhler - 2022 - Ethics and Information Technology 24 (3).
    The number of people with dementia is increasing worldwide. At the same time, family and professional caregivers’ resources are limited. A promising approach to relieve these carers’ burden and assist people with dementia is assistive technology. In order to be useful and accepted, such technologies need to respect the values and needs of their intended users. We applied the value sensitive design approach to identify values and needs of patients with dementia and family and professional caregivers in respect to assistive (...)
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  • Unapproved Clinical Trials in Russia: Exception or Norm?Petr Talantov, Ravil Niyazov, Galina Viryasova, Margarita Dranitsyna & Ilya Yasny - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-8.
    Background In modern Russia, any clinical investigation of a pharmaceutical for use in humans is subject to prior evaluation and approval by the Ministry of Health and its Central Ethics Committee. Despite this, some researchers and trial sponsors fail to comply, this is particularly true in case of the studies initiated by domestic sponsors or sponsor-investigators and published in Russian language medical journals. This exploratory research aims to discover whether it is a sporadic non-compliance with regulations or a common practice. (...)
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  • Discovering Dignity Through Experience: How Nursing Students Discover the Expression of Dignity.Tone Stikholmen, Dagfinn Nåden & Herdis Alvsvåg - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (1):194-207.
    Introduction: Dignity is a core value in nursing. Nursing education shall prepare students for ethical professional practice and facilitate insight into the phenomenon of dignity and its significance. There is limited knowledge about how nursing students discover dignity in their education. Research aim: The aim of the study is to develop an understanding of how nursing students discover and acquire dignity. Research design: The study has a hermeneutic approach where qualitative interviews of nursing students were employed. The process of interpretation (...)
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  • Dignity at Stake in Educational Relations - The Significance of Confirmation.Tone Stikholmen, Dagfinn Nåden & Herdis Alvsvåg - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302210890.
    Introduction It is a goal in nursing education to promote students’ dignity and facilitate this core value. Students’ experience of dignity is shaped by the student–supervisor relationship. Literature shows limited knowledge about how nursing students experience their own dignity during education. Research aim The aim of the study is to develop an understanding of how nursing students experience their own dignity in relation to supervisors, and what significance these experiences have in education. Research design Gadamer’s philosophical hermeneutics was chosen as (...)
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  • Beyond Criticism of Ethics Review Boards: Strategies for Engaging Research Communities and Enhancing Ethical Review Processes.Andrew Hickey, Samantha Davis, Will Farmer, Julianna Dawidowicz, Clint Moloney, Andrea Lamont-Mills, Jess Carniel, Yosheen Pillay, David Akenson, Annette Brömdal, Richard Gehrmann, Dean Mills, Tracy Kolbe-Alexander, Tanya Machin, Suzanne Reich, Kim Southey, Lynda Crowley-Cyr, Taiji Watanabe, Josh Davenport, Rohit Hirani, Helena King, Roshini Perera, Lucy Williams, Kurt Timmins, Michael Thompson, Douglas Eacersall & Jacinta Maxwell - 2021 - Journal of Academic Ethics 20 (4):549-567.
    AbstractA growing body of literature critical of ethics review boards has drawn attention to the processes used to determine the ethical merit of research. Citing criticism on the bureaucratic nature of ethics review processes, this literature provides a useful provocation for (re)considering how the ethics review might be enacted. Much of this criticism focuses on how ethics review boards deliberate, with particular attention given to the lack of transparency and opportunities for researcher recourse that characterise ethics review processes. Centered specifically (...)
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  • Action Research as a Catalyst for Change: Empowered Nurses Facilitating Patient Participation in Rehabilitation.Randi Steensgaard, Raymond Kolbaek, Julie Borup Jensen & Sanne Angel - 2021 - Nursing Inquiry 28 (1).
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  • Energy Drinks Consumption by Students at Universities in Trnava.Jaroslav Stanciak, Jana Boronova & Lubica Vareckova - 2020 - Postmodern Openings 11 (2supl1):16-25.
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  • Why Comply with a Code of Ethics?Georg Spielthenner - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (2):195-202.
    A growing number of professional associations and occupational groups are creating codes of ethics with the goal of guiding their members, protecting service users, and safeguarding the reputation of the profession. There is a great deal of literature dealing with the question to what extent ethical codes can achieve their desired objectives. The present paper does not contribute to this debate. Its aim is rather to investigate how rational it is to comply with codes of conduct. It is natural and (...)
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  • The Casuistic Method of Practical Ethics.Georg Spielthenner - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (5):417-431.
    This essay concerns itself with the methodology of practical ethics. There are a variety of methods employed in ethics. Although none have been firmly established as dominant, it is generally agreed that casuistry, or the case-based method, is one important strategy commonly used for resolving ethical issues. Casuists compare the case under consideration to a relevantly similar precedent case in which judgements have already been made, and they use these earlier judgements to determine the proper resolution of the present case. (...)
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  • Risk-Benefit Analysis: From a Logical Point of View. [REVIEW]Georg Spielthenner - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):161-170.
    In this paper I am concerned with risk–benefit analysis; that is, the comparison of the risks of a situation to its related benefits. We all face such situations in our daily lives and they are very common in medicine too, where risk–benefit analysis has become an important tool for rational decision-making. This paper explores risk–benefit analysis from a logical point of view. In particular, it seeks a better understanding of the common view that decisions should be made by weighing risks (...)
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  • Subjects' Views of Obligations to Ensure Post-Trial Access to Drugs, Care and Information: Qualitative Results From the Experiences of Participants in Clinical Trials (EPIC) Study.N. Sofaer, C. Thiessen, S. D. Goold, J. Ballou, K. A. Getz, G. Koski, R. A. Krueger & J. S. Weissman - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):183-188.
    Objectives: To report the attitudes and opinions of subjects in US clinical trials about whether or not, and why, they should receive post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug, care and information. Design: Focus groups, short self-administered questionnaires. Setting: Boston, Dallas, Detroit, Oklahoma City. Participants: Current and recent subjects in clinical trials, primarily for chronic diseases. Results: 93 individuals participated in 10 focus groups. Many thought researchers, sponsors, health insurers and others share obligations to facilitate PTA to the trial drug, (...)
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  • Improvement of Body Satisfaction in Older People: An Experimental Study.Roberto Sánchez-Cabrero, Ana C. León-Mejía, Amaya Arigita-García & Carmen Maganto-Mateo - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Ethical Principles and Placebo-Controlled Trials – Interpretation and Implementation of the Declaration of Helsinki’s Placebo Paragraph in Medical Research.Antonia-Sophie Skierka & Karin B. Michels - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):24.
    In October 2013, the Declaration of Helsinki was revised a seventh time in its 50 year history. While it is the most widely accepted set of ethical principles for the protection of patients participating in medical research, the Declaration of Helsinki has also been subject of constant controversy. In particular, its paragraph on the use of placebo controls in clinical trials divides the research community into active-control and placebo orthodox proponents, both continuously demanding revisions of the Declaration of Helsinki in (...)
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  • Ethical Guiding Principles of “Do No Harm” and the “Intention to Save Lives” in Relation to Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research: Finding Common Ground Between Religious Views and Principles of Medical Ethics.Mathana Amaris Fiona Sivaraman - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (4):409-435.
    One of the goals of medicine is to improve well-being, in line with the principle of beneficence. Likewise, scientists claim that the goal of human embryonic stem cell research is to find treatments for diseases. In hESC research, stem cells are harvested from a 5-day-old embryo. Surplus embryos from infertility treatments or embryos created for the sole purpose of harvesting stem cells are used in the research, and in the process the embryos get destroyed. The use of human embryos for (...)
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  • The Consent Problem Within DNA Biobanks.Darren Shickle - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (3):503-519.
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  • Exploring the Relationship Between Mental Well-Being, Exercise Routines, and the Intake of Image and Performance Enhancing Drugs During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: A Comparison Across Sport Disciplines.Mami Shibata, Julius Burkauskas, Artemisa R. Dores, Kei Kobayashi, Sayaka Yoshimura, Pierluigi Simonato, Ilaria De Luca, Dorotea Cicconcelli, Valentina Giorgetti, Irene P. Carvalho, Fernando Barbosa, Cristina Monteiro, Toshiya Murai, Maria A. Gómez-Martínez, Zsolt Demetrovics, Krisztina Edina Ábel, Attila Szabo, Alejandra Rebeca Melero Ventola, Eva Maria Arroyo-Anlló, Ricardo M. Santos-Labrador, Inga Griskova-Bulanova, Aiste Pranckeviciene, Giuseppe Bersani, Hironobu Fujiwara & Ornella Corazza - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Introduction: Physical distancing under the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic had a significant impact on lifestyles, including exercise routines. In this study, we examined the relationship between mental health and addictive behaviors, such as excessive exercise and the use of image and performance enhancing drugs across 12 sport disciplines.Materials and methods: A large cross-sectional sample of the adult population was surveyed. The mean age was 33.09. The number of male participants was 668. The use of IPEDs was assessed in conjunction with (...)
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  • In Plain Sight: A Solution to a Fundamental Challenge in Human Research.Lois Shepherd & Margaret Foster Riley - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):970-989.
    The physician-researcher conflict of interest has thus far eluded satisfactory solution. Most attempts to deal with it focus on improving informed consent. But those attempts are not successful and may even make things worse. Research subjects are already voluntarily undertaking the risks of research — we should not ask them to go it alone — to undergo medical “treatment” without medical “care.” The only effective solution is that in much clinical research, each research subject should have a doctor independent from (...)
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  • In Plain Sight: A Solution to a Fundamental Challenge in Human Research.Lois Shepherd & Margaret Foster Riley - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):970-989.
    The physician-researcher conflict of interest, a long-standing and widely recognized ethical challenge of clinical research, has thus far eluded satisfactory solution. The conflict is fairly straightforward. Medical research and medical therapy are distinct pursuits; the former is aimed at producing generalizable knowledge for the benefit of future patients, whereas the latter is aimed at addressing the individualized medical needs of a particular patient. When the physician-researcher combines these pursuits, he or she serves two masters and cannot — no matter how (...)
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  • When "Minimal Risk" Research Yields Clinically-Significant Data, Maybe the Risks Aren't So Minimal.Helen M. Sharp & Robert D. Orr - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (2):32-36.
    Surveys and routine clinical procedures applied in research protocols are typically considered only minimally risky to participants. The apparent benign nature of "minimal risk" tasks increases the chance that investigators and Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) will overlook the probability that clinical tools will identify signs, symptoms, or definitive test results that are clinically-relevant to subjects' welfare. "Minimal risk" procedures may also pose a particular hazard to participants in clinical research by increasing the therapeutic misconception because the tasks mimic clinical care (...)
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  • Strategies to Minimize Risks and Exploitation in Phase One Trials on Healthy Subjects.Adil E. Shamoo & David B. Resnik - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (3):W1-W13.
    Most of the literature on phase one trials has focused on ethical and safety issues in research on patients with advanced cancer, but this article focuses on healthy, adult subjects. The article makes six specific recommendations for protecting the rights and welfare of healthy subjects in phase one trials: 1) because phase one trials are short in duaration (usually 1 to 3 months), researchers should gather more data on the short-term and long-term risks of participation in phase one studies by (...)
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  • “You Would Not Be in a Hurry to Go Back Home”: Patients’ Willingness to Participate in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials at a Clinical and Research Facility in Kampala, Uganda.Deborah Ekusai Sebatta, Godfrey Siu, Henry W. Nabeta, Godwin Anguzu, Stephen Walimbwa, Mohammed Lamorde, Badru Bukenya & Andrew Kambugu - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-14.
    BackgroundFew studies have examined factors associated with willingness of people living with HIV to participate in HIV treatment clinical trials in Sub-Saharan Africa. We assessed the factors associated with participation of PLHIV in HIV treatment clinical trials research at a large urban clinical and research facility in Uganda.MethodsA mixed methods study was conducted at the Infectious Diseases Institute, adult HIV clinic between July 2016 and January 2017. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, focused group discussions with respondents categorised as either (...)
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  • Valuing the Individual – Evaluating the Dignity Care Intervention.Annika Söderman, Carina Werkander Harstäde, Maria Hälleberg Nyman & Karin Blomberg - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302211229.
    Background Palliative care needs in older persons can endanger their dignity. To provide dignity-conserving care to older persons, the Swedish Dignity Care Intervention can be used. The DCI-SWE is built on Chochinov’s dignity model and the original version, developed and tested in UK and Scotland. Aim To describe older persons’ and their relatives’ experiences of dignity and dignity-conserving care when using the DCI-SWE in municipal health care. Research design A mixed method study with convergent parallel design. Participants and research context (...)
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  • Integrating Electrodermal Biofeedback Into Pharmacologic Treatment of Grand Mal Seizures.Tullio Scrimali, Damiana Tomasello & Massimo Sciuto - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Reevaluating the Right to Withdraw From Research Without Penalty.G. Owen Schaefer & Alan Wertheimer - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (4):14-16.
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  • Measuring Job Crafting Across Cultures: Lessons Learned From Comparing a German and an Australian Sample.Vivian Schachler, Sandra D. Epple, Elisa Clauss, Annekatrin Hoppe, Gavin R. Slemp & Matthias Ziegler - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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