Switch to: References

Citations of:

The Nicomachean Ethics

Clarendon Press (1951)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Influence of Moral Education on the Personal Worldview of Students.Jacomijn C. van der Kooij, Doret J. de Ruyter & Siebren Miedema - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (3):346-363.
    This article researches whether approaches to moral education aim to influence the development of the personal worldview of students. An example of a Dutch moral education programme is presented and the findings are used to analyse various approaches to moral education. Our analysis demonstrates that every approach aims to influence the personal worldview of students because of underlying ontological beliefs. This is the inevitable and minimal influence a moral education approach has on personal worldview. Our analysis also demonstrates that two (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Oppression and Resistance: Frye's Politics of Reality[REVIEW]Claudia Card - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):149-166.
    Marilyn Frye's first book, The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory, presents nine philosophical lectures: four on women's subordination, four on resistance and rebellion, one on revolution. Its approach combines a lesbian perspective with analytical philosophy of language. The major contributions of the book are its analysis of oppression, highly suggestive discussions of the roles of attention in knowledge and ignorance and in arrogance and love, a defense of political separatism not based on female supremacism, and a development of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Review: Oppression and Resistance: Frye's Politics of Reality. [REVIEW]Claudia Card - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):149 - 166.
    Marilyn Frye's first book, The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory, presents nine philosophical lectures: four on women's subordination, four on resistance and rebellion, one on revolution. Its approach combines a lesbian perspective with analytical philosophy of language. The major contributions of the book are its analysis of oppression, highly suggestive discussions of the roles of attention in knowledge and ignorance and in arrogance and love, a defense of political separatism not based on female supremacism, and a development of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Management Wisdom in Perspective: Are You Virtuous Enough to Succeed in Volatile Times?Ali Intezari & David J. Pauleen - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):1-12.
    This paper addresses the question, how does wisdom contribute to management in circumstances of extreme unpredictability? We first discuss three key factors that fundamentally affect the conduct of business—human, knowledge, and the environment—as well as their characteristics and interactions. We then argue that managing the interaction between these factors to effectively deal with the complexity and unpredictability of a rapidly changing business world requires the appropriate application of wisdom, in particular ethics in the form of practical, moral, and epistemic virtues. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • MacIntyre's Revolutionary Aristotelian Philosophy and His Idea of an Educated Public Revisited.James Macallister - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):524-537.
    In this article I revisit MacIntyre's lecture on the idea of an educated public. I argue that the full significance of MacIntyre's views on the underlying purposes of universities only become clear when his lecture on the educated public is situated in the context of his wider ‘revolutionary Aristotelian’ philosophical project. I claim that for MacIntyre educational institutions should both support students to learn how to think for themselves and act for the common good. After considering criticisms from Putnam, Wain (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Reason, Fantasy and Moral Responsibility: A Psycho-Philosophical Motif in the Work of John Wilson.David Carr - 2000 - Journal of Moral Education 29 (3):285-299.
    A constantly reworked theme in the work of John Wilson is that of some identity or overlap of (psycho) therapeutic concerns with those of more conventional learning and education: (some) instances of therapy are held to coincide with (some) instances of education à propos the alleviation of what he generally calls ''fantasies''. In an early celebrated article, Wilson casts certain aspects of education as such in this therapeutic role, but in later work it is philosophical education which is credited with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Cultural Roots of Professional Wisdom: Towards a Broader View of Teacher Expertise.David Carr & Don Skinner - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):141-154.
    Perhaps the most pressing issue concerning teacher education and training since the end of the Second World War has been that of the role of theory—or principled reflection—in professional expertise. Here, although the main post-war architects of a new educational professionalism clearly envisaged a key role for theory—considering such disciplines as psychology, sociology and philosophy as indispensable for reflective practice—there are nevertheless well-rehearsed difficulties about crediting such disciplines with quite the (applied) role in educational practice of (say) physiology or anatomy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • On the Contribution of Literature and the Arts to the Educational Cultivation of Moral Virtue, Feeling and Emotion.David Carr - 2005 - Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):137-151.
    This paper sets out to explore connections between a number of plausible claims concerning education in general and moral education in particular: (i) that education is a matter of broad cultural initiation rather than narrow academic or vocational training; (ii) that any education so conceived would have a key concern with the moral dimensions of personal formation; (iii) that emotional growth is an important part of such moral formation; and (iv) that literature and other arts have an important part to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Virtual Alterity and the Reformatting of Ethics.David Gunkel & Debra Hawhee - 2003 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3-4):173-193.
    This article seeks to reconsider how traditional notions of ethics-ethics that privilege reason, truth, meaning, and a fixed conception of "the human"-are upended by digital technology, cybernetics, and virtual reality. We argue that prevailing ethical systems are incompatible with the way technology refigures the concepts and practices of identity, meaning, truth, and finally, communication. The article examines how both ethics and technology repurpose the liberal humanist subject even as they render such a subject untenable. Such an impasse reformats the question (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Why Virtual Friendship is No Genuine Friendship.Barbro Fröding & Martin Peterson - 2012 - Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):201-207.
    Based on a modern reading of Aristotle’s theory of friendship, we argue that virtual friendship does not qualify as genuine friendship. By ‘virtual friendship’ we mean the type of friendship that exists on the internet, and seldom or never is combined with real life interaction. A ‘traditional friendship’ is, in contrast, the type of friendship that involves substantial real life interaction, and we claim that only this type can merit the label ‘genuine friendship’ and thus qualify as morally valuable. The (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • From Gratitude to Lamentation: On the Moral and Psychological Economy of Gift, Gain and Loss.David Carr - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):41-59.
    The passing of Nelson Mandela and other figures of contemporary importance may prompt the interesting question of how we might or should understand the psychological, social and moral function of lamentation in human life. This paper aims to show that such responses are not just of emotional and interpersonal significance, but also of serious moral import. To this end, the paper proceeds via exploration of conceptually and morally suggestive correspondences or resonances between the logical grammar of lamentation—which, to be sure, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • “Uproar, Bulk, Rage, Suffocation, Effort Unceasing, Frenzied and Vain”: Beckett’s Transports of Rage.Russell Smith - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (2):137-147.
    In a 1961 interview, Beckett warded off philosophical interpretations of his work: ‘I’m no intellectual. All I am is feeling’. Despite the emotional intensity of Beckett’s post-war writing, Beckett criticism has tended to ignore this claim, preferring the kinds of philosophical readings that Beckett here rejects. In particular, Beckett criticism underestimates the element of rage in his work. This paper argues that Beckett’s post-war breakthrough is enabled by a radical reconsideration of the nature of feeling and of rage in particular. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Gratitude a Moral Virtue?David Carr - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (6):1475-1484.
    One matter upon which the already voluminous philosophical and psychological literature on the topic seems to be agreed is that gratitude is a psychologically and socially beneficial human quality of some moral significance. Further to this, gratitude seems to be widely regarded by positive psychologists and virtue ethicists as a moral virtue. This paper, however, sets out to show that such claims and assumptions about the moral character of gratitude are questionable and that its status as a moral virtue is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • ‘We're Just Not Friends Anymore’: Self-Knowledge and Friendship Endings.Mary Healy - 2015 - Ethics and Education 10 (2):186-197.
    A long standing argument in philosophy purports that friendship plays a considerable role in our self-knowledge and perspectives on the world, much of which can be accredited to the enduring influence of the Aristotelian conceptualisation of friendship. More recent thinking on friendship terminations has given cause to rethink and clarify the basis of such suppositions. This has particular relevance within the realm of childhood where 'friendship termination' is considered a common experience. This article seeks to remind us that friendship can (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Education, Measurement and the Professions: Reclaiming a Space for Democratic Professionality in Education.Gert Biesta - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (4):315-330.
    In this article, I explore the impact of the contemporary culture of measurement on education as a professional field. I focus particularly on the democratic dimensions of professionalism, which includes both the democratic qualities of professional action in education itself and the way in which education, as a profession, supports the wider democratic cause. I show how an initial authoritarian conception of professionalism was opened up in the 1960s and 1970s towards more democratic and more inclusive forms of professional action. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • In the Garage: Assemblage, Opportunity and Techno-Aesthetics.Glen Fuller - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (1):125-136.
    :How can a properly relational and anti-substantialist conception of masculinity be understood as belonging to the territorialising assemblage of the garage? Focusing on the relation between the suburban garage and masculinity, this article develops the concept of “opportunity” as part of a gendered passage of action. Two examples of the garage-assemblage are examined through their popular cultural myths. The first involves the example of disaffected working-class male youth working on cars as represented in the Australian film Metal Skin. The second (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Blameless, Constructive, and Political Anger.Lucas A. Swaine - 1996 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (3):257–274.
    Scholars of the emotions maintain that all anger requires an object of blame. In order to be angry, many writers argue, one must believe than an actor has done serious damage to something that one values. Yet an individual may be angered without blaming another. This kind of emotion, called situational anger, does not entail a corresponding object of blame. Situational anger can be a useful force in public life, enabling citizens to draw attention to the seriousness of social or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Perceiving the Moral Dimension of Practice: Insights From Murdoch, Vetlesen, and Aristotle.P. Anne Scott - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (3):137-145.
  • How Should a Nurse Approach Truth-Telling? A Virtue Ethics Perspective.Kate Hodkinson - 2008 - Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):248-256.
    Abstract Truth-telling is a key issue within the nurse–patient relationship. Nurses make decisions on a daily basis regarding what information to tell patients. This paper analyses truth-telling within an end of life scenario. Virtue ethics provides a useful philosophical approach for exploring decisions on information disclosure in more detail. Virtue ethics allows appropriate examination of the moral character of the nurse involved, their intention, ability to use wisdom and judgement when making decisions and the virtue of truth-telling. It is appropriate (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Reflection and Moral Maturity in a Nurse's Caring Practice: A Critical Perspective.Jane Sumner - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):159-169.
    The likelihood of nurse reflection is examined from the theoretical perspectives of Habermas' Theory of Communicative Action and Moral Action and Sumner's Moral Construct of Caring in Nursing as Communicative Action, through a critical social theory lens. The argument is made that until the nurse reaches the developmental level of post-conventional moral maturity and/or Benner's Stage 5: expert, he or she is not capable of being inwardly directed reflective on self. The three developmental levels of moral maturity and Benner's stages (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Scepticism About the Virtue Ethics Approach to Nursing Ethics.Stephen Holland - 2010 - Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):151-158.
    Nursing ethics centres on how nurses ought to respond to the moral situations that arise in their professional contexts. Nursing ethicists invoke normative approaches from moral philosophy. Specifically, it is increasingly common for nursing ethicists to apply virtue ethics to moral problems encountered by nurses. The point of this article is to argue for scepticism about this approach. First, the research question is motivated by showing that requirements on nurses such as to be kind, do not suffice to establish virtue (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Introduction: Virtue and Vice.Heather Battaly - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):1-21.
    Abstract: This introduction to the collection Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic addresses three main questions: (1) What is a virtue theory in ethics or epistemology? (2) What is a virtue? and (3) What is a vice? (1) It suggests that a virtue theory takes the virtues and vices of agents to be more fundamental than evaluations of acts or beliefs, and defines right acts or justified beliefs in terms of the virtues. (2) It argues that there are two important (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Epistemic Self-Indulgence.Heather Battaly - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):214-234.
    I argue in this essay that there is an epistemic analogue of moral self-indulgence. Section 1 analyzes Aristotle's notion of moral temperance, and its corresponding vices of self-indulgence and insensibility. Section 2 uses Aristotle's notion of moral self-indulgence as a model for epistemic self-indulgence. I argue that one is epistemically self-indulgent only if one either : (ESI1) desires, consumes, and enjoys appropriate and inappropriate epistemic objects; or (ESI2) desires, consumes, and enjoys epistemic objects at appropriate and inappropriate times; or (ESI3) (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • A Critique of Positive Psychology—or 'the New Science of Happiness'.Alistair Miller - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (3-4):591-608.
    This paper argues that the new science of positive psychology is founded on a whole series of fallacious arguments; these involve circular reasoning, tautology, failure to clearly define or properly apply terms, the identification of causal relations where none exist, and unjustified generalisation. Instead of demonstrating that positive attitudes explain achievement, success, well-being and happiness, positive psychology merely associates mental health with a particular personality type: a cheerful, outgoing, goal-driven, status-seeking extravert.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Philosophy's Contribution to Social Science Research on Education.Martyn Hammersley - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):273–286.
  • The Teaching of Skills and the Skills of Teaching: A Reply to Robin Barrow.Morwenna Griffiths - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):203–214.
  • What is an Educational Practice?Wilfred Carr - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):163–175.
  • Philosophy, Methodology and Action Research.Wilfred Carr - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):421–435.
    The aim of this paper is to examine the role of methodology in action research. It begins by showing how, as a form of inquiry concerned with the development of practice, action research is nothing other than a modern 20th century manifestation of the pre‐modern tradition of practical philosophy. It then draws in Gadamer's powerful vindication of the contemporary relevance of practical philosophy in order to show how, by embracing the idea of ‘methodology’, action research functions to sustain a distorted (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Critical Theory and Educational Studies.Wilfred Carr - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (2):287–295.
  • Theories of Theory and Practice.Wilfred Carr - 1986 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 20 (2):177–186.
  • Relation, Virtue, and Relational Virtue: Three Concepts of Caring.Shirong Luo - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):92-110.
    : This essay breaks new ground in defending the view that contemporary care-based ethics and early Confucian ethics share some important common ground. Luo also introduces the notion of relational virtue in an attempt to bridge a conceptual gap between relational caring ethics and agent-based virtue ethics, and to make the connections between the ethics of care and Confucian ethics philosophically clearer and more defensible.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Responsibility in Childhood: Three Developmental Trajectories.Elinor Ochs & Carolina Izquierdo - 2009 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 37 (4):391-413.
  • The Role Obligations of Students and Lecturers in Higher Education.Julie-Anne Regan - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (1):14-24.
    The current discussion of consumerism in higher education focuses largely on what the providers are obliged to do for the consumers, against the background of rising tuition fees. This framework does not always sit comfortably with lecturers in the context of a learning and teaching relationship, as it appears to ignore the reciprocal obligations lecturers and students have to one another. The purpose of this article is to offer an alternative view of what lecturers and students are obliged to do (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Habituation: A Method for Cultivating Starting Points in the Ethical Life.Jeannie Kerr - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (4):643-655.
    The Aristotelian concept of habituation is receiving mounting and warranted interest in educational circles, but has also been subject to different lines of interpretation and critique. In this article, I bring forward Aristotle's words on habituation, and then clarify the two lines of interpretation that have developed in the contemporary philosophical literature. I argue that the mechanical interpretation contains an intellectualist bias and then argue a cognitivist view that positions habituation as the only method appropriate to cultivating the starting points (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Education as Dialogue.Tasos Kazepides - 2012 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (9):913-925.
    The purpose of this paper is to show that genuine dialogue is a refined human achievement and probably the most valid criterion on the basis of which we can evaluate educational or social policy and practice. The paper explores the prerequisites of dialogue in the language games, the common certainties, the rules of logic and the variety of common virtues; defends dialogue as a normative concept and interprets the principles of dialogue as extensions of its prerequisite virtues. Finally, it examines (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Happiness Rich and Poor: Lessons From Philosophy and Literature.Ruth Cigman - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (2):308-322.
    Happiness is a large idea. It looms enticingly before us when we are young, delivers verdicts on our lives when we are old, and seems to inform a responsible engagement with children. The question is raised: do we want this idea? I explore a distinction between rich and poor conceptions of happiness, suggesting that many sceptical arguments are directed against the latter. If happiness is to receive its teleological due, recognised in rather the way Aristotle saw it, as a final (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Re-Thinking Capitalism: What We Can Learn From Scholasticism?Domènec Melé - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (2):293-304.
    The macro-level business ethics in Scholasticism contrasts with modern Anglo-Saxon Capitalism, which is very influential worldwide. Scholasticism, developed between the thirteenth and the mid-seventeenth centuries, deals with key elements of free market morality, including private property, contracts, profits, prices, and free competition. For over 500 years Scholasticism tried to understand economic phenomena and business activities and reflected on them from an ethical perspective. Scholasticism offered the crucial lesson of the centrality of justice and the role of practical wisdom in considering (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Is There Unity Within the Discipline?Roger A. Newham - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (3):214-223.
    This paper will examine a claim that nursing is united by its moral stance. The claim is that there are moral constraints on nurses' actions as people practising nursing and that they are in some way different from both what for now can be called standard morality and also different from the person's own moral views who also happens to be a nurse, hence the defining and unifying factor for nursing. I will begin by situating the claim within the broader (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Virtue Epistemology and the Philosophy of Education.James Macallister - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):251-270.
    This article initially provides a brief overview of virtue epistemology; it thereafter considers some possible ramifications of this branch of the theory of knowledge for the philosophy of education. The main features of three different manifestations of virtue epistemology are first explained. Importantly, it is then maintained that developments in virtue epistemology may offer the resources to critique aspects of the debate between Hirst and Carr about how the philosophy of education ought to be carried out and by whom. Wilfred (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Towards an Evidence‐Based 'Medicine of the Person': The Contribution of Psychiatry to Health Care Provision.John L. Cox - 2008 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (5):694-698.
  • The Body Disciplined: Rewriting Teaching Competence and the Doctrine of Reflection.Peter Erlandson - 2005 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (4):661–670.
  • Are Human Rights Redundant in the Ethical Codes of Psychologists?Alfred Allan - 2013 - Ethics and Behavior 23 (4):251-265.
    The codes of ethics and conduct of a number of psychology bodies explicitly refer to human rights, and the American Psychological Association recently expanded the use of the construct when it amended standard 1.02 of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. What is unclear is how these references to human rights should be interpreted. In this article I examine the historical development of human rights and associated constructs and the contemporary meaning of human rights. As human rights (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • On the Moral Responsibility of Military Robots.Thomas Hellström - 2013 - Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):99-107.
    This article discusses mechanisms and principles for assignment of moral responsibility to intelligent robots, with special focus on military robots. We introduce the concept autonomous power as a new concept, and use it to identify the type of robots that call for moral considerations. It is furthermore argued that autonomous power, and in particular the ability to learn, is decisive for assignment of moral responsibility to robots. As technological development will lead to robots with increasing autonomous power, we should be (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • The Virtues of Ingenuity: Reasoning and Arguing Without Bias.Olivier Morin - 2014 - Topoi 33 (2):499-512.
    This paper describes and defends the “virtues of ingenuity”: detachment, lucidity, thoroughness. Philosophers traditionally praise these virtues for their role in the practice of using reasoning to solve problems and gather information. Yet, reasoning has other, no less important uses. Conviction is one of them. A recent revival of rhetoric and argumentative approaches to reasoning (in psychology, philosophy and science studies) has highlighted the virtues of persuasiveness and cast a new light on some of its apparent vices—bad faith, deluded confidence, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • On the Moral Agency of Computers.Thomas M. Powers - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):227-236.
    Can computer systems ever be considered moral agents? This paper considers two factors that are explored in the recent philosophical literature. First, there are the important domains in which computers are allowed to act, made possible by their greater functional capacities. Second, there is the claim that these functional capacities appear to embody relevant human abilities, such as autonomy and responsibility. I argue that neither the first (Domain-Function) factor nor the second (Simulacrum) factor gets at the central issue in the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Philia and Pedagogy ‘Side by Side’: The Perils and Promise of Teacher–Student Friendships.Amy B. Shuffelton - 2012 - Ethics and Education 7 (3):211-223.
    . Philia and pedagogy ‘side by side’: the perils and promise of teacher–student friendships. Ethics and Education: Vol. 7, Creating spaces, pp. 211-223. doi: 10.1080/17449642.2013.766541.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Caring Orientations: The Normative Foundations of the Craft of Management.Matt Statler, Donna Ladkin & Steven S. Taylor - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (3):575-584.
    In view of the ethical crises that have proliferated over the last decade, scholars have reflected critically on the ideal of management as a value-neutral, objective science. The alternative conceptualization of management as a craft has been introduced but not yet sufficiently elaborated. In particular, although authors such as Mintzberg and MacIntyre suggest craft as an appropriate alternative to science, neither of them systematically describes what “craft” is, and thus how it could inform an ethical managerial orientation. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Civic and Cosmopolitan Friendship.Kerri Woods - 2013 - Res Publica 19 (1):81-94.
    This article draws out two implications for cosmopolitan or global friendship from an examination of a recent work on civic friendship in the domestic sphere: (1) Insofar as it is the case that civic friendship, as defined by Schwarzenbach (On civic friendship: Including women in the state. Columbia University Press, New York, 2009) is necessary for justice in the state, it is also the case that the absence of global justice can be partially explained by the absence of what might (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moral Dilemmas, Moral Reasons and Moral Learning: Interpreting a Real Case in Terms of Particularistic Theory.Patrick Maclagan - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (3):221-236.
    The core of the paper consists of dialogue from a true case where an employee experienced moral dilemmas following a disquieting directive from his manager. The case is considered from the perspective of Dancy's particularistic theory of moral reasons. This case was chosen not to illustrate the theory, but rather to test the assumption that an approach to moral judgement based on Ross and Dancy has general applicability. It is suggested that, in its simplest form, that approach approximates to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Asé and Amen, Sister!Thelathia N. Young & Shannon J. Miller - 2015 - Journal of Religious Ethics 43 (2):289-316.
    At times, the academy seems devoid of justice because it emphasizes the cultivation of knowledge often denied to marginalized individuals and communities. As black queer feminist scholars doing praxis-driven theorizing from separate fields on the subject of black queer families and communities, we employ research methods that resist the dynamics of power and privilege that exist within normative researcher-participant exchanges. In this essay, we explore and highlight the ethical, justice-oriented, and dialogical relationship between researcher-scholars and research participants. Through story and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation