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  1. Hegel on “the Living Good”.Frederick Neuhouser - 2021 - Critical Review: A Journal of Politics and Society 33 (3-4):310-331.
    ABSTRACT Hegel calls social life “the living good,” but what this means is unclear. The idea expresses an ontological claim about the kind of being that human societies possess, but it is also normatively significant, clarifying why the category of social pathology is an appropriate tool of social critique. Social life consists in processes of life infused with ethical content. Societies are normatively and functionally constituted living beings that realize the good similarly to how organisms achieve their vital ends: via (...)
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  • Hegel on the Normativity of Animal Life.Nicolás García Mills - 2020 - Hegel Bulletin:1-19.
    My aim in this paper is to show that and how animal organisms are appropriate subjects of normative evaluation, on Hegel's view. I contrast my reading with the interpretive positions of Sebastian Rand and Mark Alznauer. I disagree with Rand and agree with Alznauer that animal organisms are normatively evaluable for Hegel. I substantiate my disagreement with Rand, and supplement Alznauer's interpretation, by spelling out the role that the ‘generic process’ or ‘genus process [Gattungsprozess]’ plays within Hegel's account of animal (...)
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  • Logical and Natural Life in Hegel.Anton Kabeshkin - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):129-147.
    European Journal of Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 1, Page 129-147, March 2022.
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  • Spirit's Embeddedness in Nature: Hegel’s Decentering of Self-Legislation.Heikki Ikäheimo - 2021 - Hegel Bulletin 1 (1):1-20.
    A recently widely accepted view has it that the nature-spirit distinction in Hegel is to be understood as a distinction between a space or realm that is not normative or does not involve norms, and one that is or does. Notwithstanding the merits of this view, it has tended to create a separation between nature and spirit which is both philosophically troubling and difficult to reconcile with the picture of Hegel as the arch enemy of abstract or unreconciled dualisms. In (...)
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  • Animality, Self-Consciousness, and the Human Form of Life: A Hegelian Account.Mathew Abbott - 2021 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 35 (2):176-195.
    This article develops a Hegelian account of self-consciousness by grounding it in being animal. It draws on contemporary naturalist and rationalist philosophy to support a transformative picture of the relationship between self-consciousness and animal purposes, setting work by Danielle Macbeth, Terry Pinkard, Michael Thompson, and Matthew Boyle into dialogue with two passages from Hegel’s Aesthetics. Because we are conscious of them as such, the article argues, our ends are never simply given to us and must be determined, which means working (...)
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