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  1. Against the Tedium of Immortality.Donald W. Bruckner - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (5):623-644.
    Abstract In a well-known paper, Bernard Williams argues that an immortal life would not be worth living, for it would necessarily become boring. I examine the implications for the boredom thesis of three human traits that have received insufficient attention in the literature on Williams? paper. First, human memory decays, so humans would be entertained and driven by things that they experienced long before but had forgotten. Second, even if memory does not decay to the extent necessary to ward off (...)
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  • Operationalizing the Ethics of Soldier Enhancement.Jovana Davidovic & Forrest S. Crowell - 2022 - Journal of Military Ethics 20 (3-4):180-199.
    This article is a result of a unique project that brought together academics and military practitioners with a mind to addressing difficult moral questions in a way that is philosophically careful,...
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  • Evaluating Human Enhancements: The Importance of Ideals.Johann A. R. Roduit, Holger Baumann & Jan-Christoph Heilinger - 2014 - Monash Bioethics Review 32 (3-4):205-216.
    Is it necessary to have an ideal of perfection in mind to identify and evaluate true biotechnological human “enhancements”, or can one do without? To answer this question we suggest employing the distinction between ideal and non-ideal theory, found in the debate in political philosophy about theories of justice: the distinctive views about whether one needs an idea of a perfectly just society or not when it comes to assessing the current situation and recommending steps to increase justice. In this (...)
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  • Regulating the Use of Cognitive Enhancement: an Analytic Framework.Anita S. Jwa - 2019 - Neuroethics 12 (3):293-309.
    Recent developments in neuroscience have enabled technological advances to modulate cognitive functions of the brain. Despite ethical concerns about cognitive enhancement, both individuals and society as a whole can benefit greatly from these technologies, depending on how we regulate their use. To date, regulatory analyses of neuromodulation technologies have focused on a technology itself – for instance, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulation of a brain stimulation device – rather than the use of a technology, such as the use (...)
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  • Ethical, Legal and Social Concerns Relating to Exoskeletons.Dov Greenbaum - 2015 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):234-239.
    Exoskeletons, i.e., wearable robotics, are designed and built to amplify human strength and agility. In many cases, their purpose is to replace diminished or lost limb functionality, helping people regain some ambulatory freedom. As such, exoskeletons are particularly suited to help those with restricted mobility due to paralysis or weakened limbs. For all their promise, exoskeletons and other wearable robotics raise a number of ethical and social concerns that will need to be confronted by ethicists, the industry, and society as (...)
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  • 초인본주의의 도덕적 향상에 관한 신경윤리학적 성찰과 도덕교육적 함의. 추병완 - 2015 - Journal of Ethics: The Korean Association of Ethics 1 (100):33-62.
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  • The “Second Place” Problem: Assistive Technology in Sports and (Re) Constructing Normal.D. Baker - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (1):93-110.
    Objections to the use of assistive technologies in elite sports are generally raised when the technology in question is perceived to afford the user a potentially “unfair advantage,” when it is perceived as a threat to the purity of the sport, and/or when it is perceived as a precursor to a slippery slope toward undesirable changes in the sport. These objections rely on being able to quantify standards of “normal” within a sport so that changes attributed to the use of (...)
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