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  1. Self-Defense, Punishing Unjust Combatants and Justice in War.Steve Viner - 2010 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):297-319.
    Some contemporary Just War theorists, like Jeff McMahan, have recently built upon an individual right of self-defense to articulate moral rules of war that are at odds with commonly accepted views. For instance, they argue that in principle combatants who fight on the unjust side ought to be liable to punishment on that basis alone. Also, they reject the conclusion that combatants fighting on both sides are morally equal. In this paper, I argue that these theorists overextend their self-defense analysis (...)
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  • Defense.Kai Draper - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 145 (1):69 - 88.
    This paper is an exploration of the nature of what is perhaps the most widely recognized justification for inflicting harm on human beings: the appeal to defense (self-defense and other-defense). I develop and defend a rights-based account of the appeal to defense that takes into account whether and to what degree both the aggressor and his potential victim are morally responsible for the relevant threat. However, unlike most extant rights-based accounts, mine is not a forfeiture account. That is, I do (...)
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  • An Ethical Framework for Hacking Operations.Ross W. Bellaby - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (1):231-255.
    In recent years the power and reach of prominent hacker groups such as Anonymous and LulzSec has been clearly demonstrated. However, in a world where hackers are able to wield significant online power, can they do so ethically as legitimate agents? To answer this question this paper will develop an ethical framework based on the premise that hackers have exhibited instances where they have acted to protect people from harm at a time when there was no one else to do (...)
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  • Evaluating Pacifism.Brian Orend - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (1):3-24.
    A contemporary Kantian perspective, loosely defined, is a cosmopolitan moral doctrine, focused on human rights protection, and framed as a general set of rules meant to guide state conduct. The core propositions of just-war theory, presupposed here, are that: moral norms are relevant to judging state conduct in the international arena; and sometimes it is morally permissible for a state to resort to war in the international arena. In general, it is permissible for a state to do so in order (...)
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