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  1. Impact Investments, Evil Investments, and Something in Between: Comparing Social Banks' Investment Criteria and Strategies with Depositors' Investment Preferences.Nikolas Höhnke & Susanne Homölle - forthcoming - Business Ethics: A European Review.
    Business Ethics: A European Review, EarlyView.
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  • Ethics and Expertise: A Social Networks Perspective.Seung Hwan Mark Lee - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):607-621.
    Results from three field network studies show that depending on individuals’ network positions (central or peripheral), experts and novices have varying ethical predispositions (EP). In particular, central experts (vs. peripheral experts) have higher EP, while novices in the same positions (vs. peripheral novices) have lower EP. Results demonstrate individuals’ relational-interdependent self-construal mediates these relationships. Importantly, this research suggests that the interaction between network and individual difference variables uniquely affect individuals’ ethical predisposition. Given the lack of research focus on the impact (...)
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  • Understanding the Effects of Political Environments on Unethical Behavior in Organizations.Matthew Valle, K. Michele Kacmar & Suzanne Zivnuska - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 156 (1):173-188.
    Based on a framework that integrates job demands-resources theory, social cognitive theory Handbook of personality, Guilford Press, New York, pp 154–196, 1999) and regulatory focus theory, the purpose of this research is to investigate the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and subsequent moral disengagement and unethical behavior. We conducted a laboratory study and also collected data in two separate surveys 6 weeks apart from 206 individuals working full time to investigate the relationships presented in our model. In both studies, (...)
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  • Case-Based Ethics Instruction: The Influence of Contextual and Individual Factors in Case Content on Ethical Decision-Making.Zhanna Bagdasarov, Chase E. Thiel, James F. Johnson, Shane Connelly, Lauren N. Harkrider, Lynn D. Devenport & Michael D. Mumford - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1305-1322.
    Cases have been employed across multiple disciplines, including ethics education, as effective pedagogical tools. However, the benefit of case-based learning in the ethics domain varies across cases, suggesting that not all cases are equal in terms of pedagogical value. Indeed, case content appears to influence the extent to which cases promote learning and transfer. Consistent with this argument, the current study explored the influences of contextual and personal factors embedded in case content on ethical decision-making. Cases were manipulated to include (...)
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  • Religiosity, Attitude Toward Business, and Ethical Beliefs: Hispanic Consumers in the United States. [REVIEW]Abhijit M. Patwardhan, Megan E. Keith & Scott J. Vitell - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):61-70.
    Growth of the Hispanic consumer population in America is changing the marketplace landscape. Due to their considerable buying power, a better understanding of Hispanic consumer behavior has become a necessity. The marketing literature has examined issues regarding religiosity and attitude toward business in regards to consumer ethical beliefs as well as research differentiating consumers on the basis of ethnicity due to their inherently different religious principles. Therefore, the present study contributes to the existing consumer ethics literature by examining the roles (...)
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  • Maybe It’s Right, Maybe It’s Wrong: Structural and Social Determinants of Deception in Negotiation.Mara Olekalns, Christopher J. Horan & Philip L. Smith - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):89-102.
    Context shapes negotiators’ actions, including their willingness to act unethically. Focusing on negotiators use of deception, we used a simulated two-party negotiation to test how three contextual variables—regulatory focus, power, and trustworthiness—interacted to shift negotiators’ ethical thresholds. We demonstrated that these three variables interact to either inhibit or activate deception, providing support for an interactionist model of ethical decision-making. Three patterns emerged from our analyses. First, low power inhibited and high power activated deception. Second, promotion-focused negotiators favored sins of omission, (...)
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  • The Relationships of Empathy, Moral Identity and Cynicism with Consumers' Ethical Beliefs: The Mediating Role of Moral Disengagement. [REVIEW]Rafi M. M. I. Chowdhury & Mario Fernando - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (4):1-18.
    This study examines the relationships of empathy, moral identity and cynicism with the following dimensions of consumer ethics: the passive dimension (passively benefiting at the expense of the seller), the active/legal dimension (benefiting from questionable but legal actions), the ‘no harm, no foul’ dimension (actions that do not harm anyone directly but are considered unethical by some) and the ‘doing-good’/recycling dimension (pro-social actions). A survey of six hundred Australian consumers revealed that both empathy and moral identity were related to negative (...)
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  • The Moderating Effect of Supervisor’s Behavioral Integrity on the Relationship Between Regulatory Focus and Impression Management.K. Michele Kacmar & Reginald Tucker - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 135 (1):87-98.
    The desire to control how others see us is a ubiquitous phenomenon. Decades of research have suggested that the results associated with how others see us are too great an influence to ignore. The tactics we use and behaviors we engage in to control how others see us is known as impression management. This study examines the relationship between regulatory focus and the use of exemplification or supplication impression management tactics. We use regulatory focus theory to examine this phenomenon. First, (...)
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