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  1. Distant Time, Distant Gesture: Speech and Gesture Correlate to Express Temporal Distance.Javier Valenzuela & Daniel Alcaraz Carrión - 2021 - Semiotica 2021 (241):159-183.
    This study investigates whether there is a relation between the semantics of linguistic expressions that indicate temporal distance and the spatial properties of their co-speech gestures. To this date, research on time gestures has focused on features such as gesture axis, direction, and shape. Here we focus on a gesture property that has been overlooked so far: the distance of the gesture in relation to the body. To achieve this, we investigate two types of temporal linguistic expressions are addressed: proximal (...)
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  • ‘Experience is Our Great and Only Teacher’: A Peircean Reading of Wim Wenders'Wings of Desire.Torill Strand - 2014 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3):433-445.
    Wim Wenders' film Wings of Desire tells the story of an angel who wishes to become mortal in order to know the simple joy of human life. Told from the angel's point of view, the film is shot in black and white. But at the very instant the angel perceives the realities of human experience, the film blossoms into colour. In this article, I use this film to illustrate and explore Peirce's notion of experience and his claim that ‘experience is (...)
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  • Peirce’s Universal Categories: On Their Potential for Gesture Theory and Multimodal Analysis.Irene Mittelberg - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (228):193-222.
    Journal Name: Semiotica Issue: Ahead of print.
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  • Peirce’s ‘Prescision’ as a Transcendental Method.Gabriele Gava - 2011 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 19 (2):231 - 253.
    Abstract In this Paper I interpret Charles S. Peirce?s method of prescision as a transcendental method. In order to do so, I argue that Peirce?s pragmatism can be interpreted in a transcendental light only if we use a non?justificatory understanding of transcendental philosophy. I show how Peirce?s prescision is similar to some abstracting procedure that Immanuel Kant used in his Critique of Pure Reason. Prescision abstracts from experience and thought in general those elements without which such experience and thought would (...)
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  • Peircean Semeiotic and Legal Practices: Rudimentary and “Rhetorical” Considerations. [REVIEW]Vincent Colapietro - 2008 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 21 (3):223-246.
    Too often C. S. Peirce’s theory of signs is used simply as a classificatory scheme rather than primarily as a heuristic framework (that is, a framework designed and modified primarily for the purpose of goading and guiding inquiry in any field in which signifying processes or practices are present). Such deployment of his semeiotic betrays the letter no less than the spirit of Peirce’s writings on signs. In this essay, the author accordingly presents Peirce’s sign theory as a heuristic framework, (...)
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  • Fields of Rhetoric: Inquiry, Communication, and Learning.Mats Bergman - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (7):737-754.
  • Into the Realm of Zeroness: Peirce's Categories and Vipassana Meditation.Chris Arning - 2009 - Semiotica 2009 (176):95-115.
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  • Peircean Semiotic Indeterminacy and Its Relevance for Biosemiotics.Robert Lane - 2014 - In Vinicius Romanini (ed.), Peirce and Biosemiotics.
    This chapter presents a detailed explanation of Peirce’s early and late views on semiotic indeterminacy and then considers how those views might be applied within biosemiotics. Peirce distinguished two different forms of semiotic indeterminacy: generality and vagueness. He defined each in terms of the “right” that indeterminate signs extend, either to their interpreters in the case of generality or to their utterers in the case of vagueness, to further determine their meaning. On Peirce’s view, no sign is absolutely determinate, i.e., (...)
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