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  1. A Ética da Crença (verbete).Eros Carvalho - manuscript
    Há pelo menos três modos pelos quais o debate sobre a conduta doxástica se relaciona com a ética. O primeiro e menos contencioso assinala que o ato de crer, analogamente às ações morais, responde a um tipo de normatividade, não necessariamente moral. Por exemplo, as normas para o ato de crer podem ser puramente epistêmicas. Nesse caso, essas normas diriam respeito a como o agente deve visar ou buscar a verdade. O segundo modo como o debate da ética da crença (...)
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  2. Out of Plumb, Out of Key, and Out of Whack: Social Ethics and Democracy for the New Normal [Pandemic Ethics and Politics] (2021).Steven Fesmire & Heather Keith - manuscript
    for The Deweyan Task Before Us: The New Global Paradigm for Philosophy, Education, and Democracy Emerging from the Pandemic (2021 edited volume under review) John Dewey proposed soon after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki that citizens of techno-industrial nations suffer from "cultural lag" (LW 15:199-200; cf. LW 4:203-28). He had in mind a sort of moral jet lag, a condition in which most of the basic alternatives we have on hand to think and talk about moral and political (...)
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  3. Trosko James E.Toxicology Center - unknown - Global Bioethics 14 (4-2001).
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  4. Trosko James E.Moral Decisions - unknown - Global Bioethics 15 (3-2002).
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  5. Philosophy and Biographies and the Philosophy of William James.Ardeth Wood - unknown - Eidos: The Canadian Graduate Journal of Philosophy 19.
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  6. William James on the Misery and Glory of Consciousness.Richard M. Gale - manuscript
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  7. James S. Hoyte.Environmentalism as Populism - forthcoming - Business, Ethics, and the Environment: The Public Policy Debate.
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  8. William James on Emotion and Morals.Guy Axtell - forthcoming - In Jacob Goodson (ed.), Cries of the Wounded: William James, Moral Philosophy, and the Moral Life. Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Emotions chapter (XXV) in James' Principles of Psychology traverses the entire range of experienced emotions from the “coarser” and more instinctual to the “subtler” emotions intimately involved in cognitive, moral, and aesthetic aspects of life. But Principles limits himself to an account of emotional consciousness and so there are few direct discussions in the text of Principles about what later came to be called moral psychology, and fewer about anything resembling philosophical ethics. Still, James’ short section on the subtler (...)
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  9. Review of Cheryl Misak's 'The American Pragmatists'. [REVIEW]Jeremy Dunham - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
  10. William James on Attention. Folk Psychology, Actions, and Intentions.Diego D’Angelo - forthcoming - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology:1-14.
    This paper addresses three main concerns about William James’s understanding of attention. In the first section, I will consider the question whether or not James’s famous claim that “every one kno...
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  11. James D. McCawley.Transformational Grammar - forthcoming - Foundations of Language.
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  12. From Stage Set to Heirloom: Greece in the Work of James Merrill.Rachel Hadas - forthcoming - Arion.
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  13. “Pragmatism’s Family Feud: Peirce, James and the Spirit of 1872”.Jackman Henry - forthcoming - In Robert Talisse & Scott Aikin (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Pragmatism. New York City: Routledge.
    While William James and Charles Sanders Peirce are considered the two fathers of American Pragmatism, Peircian Pragmatism is often being presented as the comparatively ‘objective’ alternative to metaphysical realism, with the Jamesian version being castigated as an overly ‘subjective’ departure from Peirce’s position. However, while James clearly does put more of an emphasis on ‘subjective’ factors than does Peirce, his doing so is often the result of his simply drawing out consequences of the framework that Peirce presented in an 1872 (...)
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  14. “James’s Pragmatic Maxim and the ‘Elasticity’ of Meaning”.Henry Jackman - forthcoming - In The Jamesian Mind. New York, NY, USA: pp. 274-284.
    To the extent that William James had an account of ‘meaning,’ it is best captured in his “pragmatic maxim”, but James’s maxim has notoriously been open to many conflicting interpretations. It will be argued here that some of these interpretive difficulties stem from the fact that (1) James seriously understates the differences between his own views and those presented by Peirce in “How to Make our Ideas Clear”, and (2) James’s understanding of the maxim typically ties meaning to truth, but (...)
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  15. James, Intentionality and Analysis.Henry Jackman - forthcoming - In Oxford Handbook of William James. New York: Oxford University Press.
    James was always interested in the problem of how our thoughts come to be about the world. Nevertheless, if one takes James to be trying to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for a thought's being about an object, counterexamples to his account will be embarrassingly easy to find. James, however, was not aiming for this sort of analysis of intentionality. Rather than trying to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for every case of a thought's being about an object, James focused (...)
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  16. “Was William James an Evidentialist?”.Henry Jackman - forthcoming - Southwest Philosophy Review.
    William James has traditionally been seen as a critic of evidentialism, with his claim that “Our passional nature not only lawfully may, but must, decide an option between propositions, whenever it is a genuine option that cannot by its nature be decided on intellectual grounds” being understood as saying that in certain cases we have the right to believe beyond what is certified by the evidence. However, there is an alternate, “expansive”, reading of James (defended most recently by Cheryl Misak, (...)
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  17. Pragmatic Arguments for Theism.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - In John Greco, Tyler Dalton McNabb & Jonathan Fuqua (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Religious Epistemology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Traditional theistic arguments conclude that God exists. Pragmatic theistic arguments, by contrast, conclude that you ought to believe in God. The two most famous pragmatic theistic arguments are put forth by Blaise Pascal (1662) and William James (1896). Pragmatic arguments for theism can be summarized as follows: believing in God has significant benefits, and these benefits aren’t available for the unbeliever. Thus, you should believe in, or ‘wager on’, God. This article distinguishes between various kinds of theistic wagers, including finite (...)
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  18. Review of Erik Banks: Realistic Empiricism (2014). [REVIEW]Mostyn W. Jones - forthcoming - Journal of Consciousness Studies.
    Erik Banks does several things in this slender yet substantial book on realistic empiricism (aka neutral monism). First, he encapsulates the main ideas of this tradition. While he goes into greater depth on some of these ideas than other introductions do, these pages are still accessible to nonspecialists. Second, he traces the the history of this tradition through the Austrian scientist, Ernst Mach, the American psychologist, William James, the British philosopher, Bertrand Russell, and others. These four chapters are a valuable (...)
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  19. James, Nonduality, and the Dynamics of Pure Experience.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In Lee A. Mcbride Iii & Erin McKenna (eds.), Pragmatist Feminism and the Work of Charlene Haddock Seigfried.
  20. James on Pure Experience.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In David Evans (ed.), Understanding James, Understanding Modernism. Bloomsbury Academic.
  21. William James on Risk, Efficacy, and Evidentialism.P. D. Magnus - forthcoming - Episteme:1-13.
    William James’ argument against William Clifford in The Will to Believe is often understood in terms of doxastic efficacy, the power of belief to influence an outcome. Although that is one strand of James’ argument, there is another which is driven by ampliative risk. The second strand of James’ argument, when applied to scientific cases, is tantamount to what is now called the Argument from Inductive Risk. Either strand of James’ argument is sufficient to rebut Clifford's strong evidentialism and show (...)
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  22. The Varieties of Religious Experience Considered From the Perspective of James's Account of the Stream of Consciousness.Thomas Natsoulas - forthcoming - Consciousness and Emotion. Agency, Conscious Choice, and Selective Perception, Amsterdam.
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  23. James H. Nehring 57.James H. Nehring - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  24. Pragmatism and the Hispanic World.G. Pappas (ed.) - forthcoming - Fordham University Press.
  25. God is Great, God is Good: James Ashbrook's Contribution to Neuroethical Theology.Jacques Rossel - forthcoming - Zygon.
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  26. William James on Religion.Pihlstrom S. & Rydenfelt H. (eds.) - forthcoming - (Palgrave McMillan “Philosophers in Depth” Series.
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  27. Patricia Harkin James J. Sosnoski.James J. Sosnoski - forthcoming - Intertexts: Reading Pedagogy in College Writing Classrooms.
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  28. Bergsonism and the History of Analytic Philosophy.Andreas Vrahimis - forthcoming - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    During the first quarter of the twentieth century, the French philosopher Henri Bergson became an international celebrity, profoundly influencing contemporary intellectual and artistic currents. While Bergsonism was fashionable, L. Susan Stebbing, Bertrand Russell, Moritz Schlick, and Rudolf Carnap launched different critical attacks against some of Bergson’s views. This book examines this series of critical responses to Bergsonism early in the history of analytic philosophy. Analytic criticisms of Bergsonism were influenced by William James, who saw Bergson as an ‘anti-intellectualist’ ally of (...)
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  29. William James, Black Elk, and the Healing Act.Bruce Wilshire - forthcoming - Pragmatic Bioethics.
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  30. „Philosophies Paint Pictures“. Zur Kant-Rezeption Bei William James.Barbara Loerzer - 2022 - In Hauke Heidenreich & Friedemann Stengel (eds.), Kant Um 1900. De Gruyter. pp. 173-208.
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  31. No Such Thing as Sociological Excuses? Performativity, Rationality and Social Scientific Expertise in Late Liberalism.Jana Bacevic - 2021 - European Journal of Social Theory 24 (3):394-410.
    This article examines a frequent assumption of sociological accounts of knowledge: the idea that knowledge acts. The performativity of knowledge claims is here analysed through the prism of ‘sociological excuses’: the idea that sociological explanations can act as ‘excuses’ for otherwise unacceptable behaviour. The article builds on Austin’s distinction between illocutionary and perlocutionary effects to discuss the relationship between sociological explanation, sociological justification and sociological critique. It argues that understanding how sociological explanations can act requires paying attention to social and (...)
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  32. Review of Steven Levine, Pragmatism, Objectivity, and Experience[REVIEW]Brandon Beasley - 2021 - Philosophy in Review 41 (3):204-206.
  33. William James and the Role of Mysticism in Religion.Rodrigo Benevides B. G. - 2021 - Manuscrito 44 (4):453-488.
    In Varieties of Religious Experience: A Study in Human Nature William James examines the role of mysticism in the development of religion. James argues that the root of all religions is precisely the experience of mystical states of consciousness. As we shall see, although James himself admits that his own psychological constitution shuts him out from these experiences, the acknowledgement of practical developments of mysticism within institutionalized religions illustrates the reality of these states of consciousness, a stance supported by James’ (...)
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  34. Isaiah Berlin and William James: Tragedy, Tragicomedy, Comedy.Charles Blattberg - 2021 - The Pluralist 16 (3):65-86.
    While both Isaiah Berlin and William James are widely seen as pluralists, this paper contends that neither is a pluralist tout court. Berlin certainly is a pluralist when it comes to morality and politics, but he is a monist when it comes to nature. And James is, paradoxically, both a pluralist and a monist as regards all of reality. These claims are advanced by showing how both thinkers’ approaches contrast with those of monists, not least Plato, Hegel, and Nietzsche. They (...)
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  35. Pragmatic Saintliness: Toward a Criticism and Celebration of Community.Benjamin Davis - 2021 - Contemporary Pragmatism 1 (18):72-94.
    This essay responds to John McDermott’s diagnosis of politics and religious life in the U.S.: “[B]oth traditional political and religious institutions are no longer an adequate let alone rich resource for a celebratory language.” I present a new celebratory language by reading William James’s description of saintliness in Varieties of Religious Experience. James gives me the resources to naturalize and democratize saintliness. Distinguished not by her transcendent miracles but by her this-worldly energies and experiments, the pragmatic saint remakes the experience (...)
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  36. Consensus Vide Convention. [REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2021 - Continental Thought and Theory 3 (2):197-211.
    A review of David Lapoujade, William James: Empiricism and Pragmatism (Duke University Press, 2020).
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  37. “Putnam, James, and ‘Absolute’ Truth”.Jackman Henry - 2021 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 13 (2).
    While historians of pragmatism often present William James as the founder of the “subjectivist” wing of pragmatism that came back into prominence with the writings of Richard Rorty, Hilary Putnam has argued that James’s views are actually much closer to Peirce’s (and Putnam’s own). Putnam does so by noting that James distinguishes two sorts of truth: “temporary truth,” which is closer to a subjective notion of warranted assertibility, and “absolute truth,” which is closer to Peirce’s own comparatively objective notion of (...)
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  38. On Jamesian ‘Passionally Caused Atheistic Belief’: A Reply to Cockayne and Warman.Alberto Oya - 2021 - Sophia 60 (2):481-485.
    Cockayne and Warman recently argued that William James’s argument as stated in his lecture ‘The Will to Believe’ can be reconstructed so as to justify a ‘passionately caused atheism.’ I will argue that this reading misses the important point of James’s argument, which is the attempt to show that our initial atheistic passional tendencies become untenable once we are aware of the beneficial consequences we might obtain from forming the belief that God exists.
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  39. Ecclesial Belonging in a World of Pure Experience: William James, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Religious Rationality in Crisis.Walter Scott Stepanenko - 2021 - Open Theology 7 (1):111-128.
    The global COVID-19 pandemic has spotlighted several instances of churches violating state issued and scientifically recommended guidelines designed to keep populations healthy and to prevent the further spread of the disease. While these instances are minority responses to these orders, they nonetheless raise questions about the rationality of ecclesial belonging in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, I draw on the work of William James and W. E. B. Du Bois to articulate a conception of ecclesial belonging as (...)
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  40. Radical Empiricism, Neutral Monism, and the Elements of Mind.Donovan Wishon - 2021 - The Monist 104 (1):125-151.
    Neutral monism is the view that both ‘mind’ and ‘matter’ are grounded in a more fundamental form of reality that is intrinsically neither mental nor material. It has often been treated as an odd fringe theory deserving of at most a footnote in the broader philosophical debates. Yet such attitudes do a grave disservice to its sophistications and significance for late nineteenth and early twentieth-century philosophy of mind and psychology. This paper sheds light on this neglected view by situating it (...)
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  41. A Critical Study of Pragmatic Philosophy and It’s Impact on Religious Knowledge: William James as a Model.Fouad Saleh Al-Shahmani - 2020 - Al-Daleel 3 (9):86-121.
    In this article we seek to shed light on pragmatic philosophy, which is one of the most important philosophies that appeared on the intellectual arena in Western society, especially in America. We wish to explain the most important premises on which this philosophy was based on in terms of trends and principles, and the extent of their influence on religious knowledge, then focusing on the methodology of the most prominent pioneer of this philosophy, William James. The method used in this (...)
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  42. William James and Allama Iqbal on Empirical Faith.Mark J. Boone - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (5):775-787.
    American Pragmatist philosopher William James and subcontinent Islamic philosopher Allama Iqbal both believe that religious experiences are an important class of those experiences with which empiricism is concerned. They both explain and defend religious belief on empirical grounds and argue that the ultimate empirical justification of a religious belief must come by looking at its fruits. This is no accident, for James influenced Iqbal on this very point. -/- However, they diverge in some matters. James defends the right to diverse (...)
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  43. W.E.B. DuBois and William James on Double Consciousness.Bernard R. Boxill - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  44. William James and the Will to Alieve.John Capps - 2020 - Contemporary Pragmatism 17 (1):1-20.
    William James’ “The Will to Believe” continues to attract scholarly attention. This might seem surprising since James’ central claim—that one may justifiably believe p despite having inconclusive evidence for p—seems both very clear and also very wrong. I argue that many of the interpretive and substantive challenges of this essay can be overcome by framing James’ thesis in terms of what Tamar Gendler defines as “alief.” I consider two readings of James’ position and conclude that the “will to believe” rests (...)
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  45. The Experience of Other Selves. Affinities and Differences Between William Ernest Hocking and Edmund Husserl.Massimo Cisternino - 2020 - Discipline filosofiche. 30 (1):67-80.
    This essay analyzes possible affinities and differences between William Ernest Hocking and Edmund Husserl in relation to the topic of solipsism and with particular emphasis on how it is that we encounter other minds in experience. Before comparing Hocking’s and Husserl’s ideas around such topics, the essay provides a brief reconstruction of William James’s and Josiah Royce’s engagement with them as a way of explaining why Hocking had a fascination for the question of how and under what methodological conditions other (...)
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  46. Pragmatism as a Way of Life: The Lasting Legacy of William James and John Dewey by Hilary Putnam and Ruth Anna Putnam.Brandon Daniel-Hughes - 2020 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 41 (1):96-98.
    David Macarthur has assembled not only a fascinating collection of essays from Hilary Putnam and Ruth Anna Putnam that spans two decades but also a collection that makes a compelling series of arguments about what pragmatism has been, is, and may yet become. This is all the more impressive since it weaves together the voices of two scholars who shared both an intellectual commitment and a life. As a longtime admirer of Hilary Putnam’s work, I was excited to take a (...)
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  47. David E. Leary. The Routledge Guidebook to James’s Principles of Psychology. (Routledge Guides to the Great Books.) Xiii + 364 Pp., Apps., Bibl., Index. London/New York: Routledge, 2018. $26.95 (Paper). Hardback and E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Gary Hatfield - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):679-680.
  48. "No Hope for the Evidentialist: On Zimmerman's Belief: A Pragmatic Picture.".Henry Jackman - 2020 - William James Studies 16 (1):66-81.
    While Aaron Zimmerman’s Belief is rightly subtitled “A Pragmatic Picture”, it concerns a set of topics about which Pragmatists themselves are not always in agreement. Indeed, while there has been a noticeable push back against evidentialism in contemporary analytic epistemology, the view can at times seem ascendant within the literature on pragmatism itself. In particular, Peirceians tend to presuppose something closer to evidentialism when they accuse Jamesians of taking pragmatism in an unproductive and irrationalist direction. This split goes back at (...)
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  49. Value and Conceptions of the Whole: The Views of Dewey, Nagel, and Gamwell.William J. Meyer - 2020 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 41 (1):53.
    William James once suggested that the underlying difference between empiricists and rationalists is that empiricists explain wholes in terms of parts, while rationalists explain parts in relation to wholes.1 Whatever the merits of this description, it is fair to say that modern thought has predominantly followed the empiricist habit of emphasizing parts and particularity rather than wholes and totality. This essay explores the views of three philosophers who have challenged this dominant trend. In various ways, John Dewey, Thomas Nagel, and (...)
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  50. Russell’s Conception of Propositional Attitudes in Relation to Pragmatism.Nikolay Milkov - 2020 - An Anthology of Philosophical Studies 14:117-128.
    The conventional wisdom has it that between 1905 and 1919 Russell was critical to pragmatism. In particular, in two essays written in 1908–9, he sharply attacked the pragmatist theory of truth, emphasizing that truth is not relative to human practice. In fact, however, Russell was much more indebted to the pragmatists, in particular to William James, as usually believed. For example, he borrowed from James two key concepts of his new epistemology: sense-data, and the distinction between knowledge by acquaintance and (...)
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