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  1. Watsuji's phenomenology of aidagara: An interpretation and application to psychopathology.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In Krueger Joel (ed.), Tetsugaku Companion to Phenomenology and Japanese Philosophy. Springer. pp. 165-181.
    I discuss Watsuji’s characterization of aidagara or “betweenness”. First, I develop a phenomenological reading of aidagara. I argue that the notion can help illuminate aspects of our embodied subjectivity and its interrelation with the world and others. Along the way, I also indicate how the notion can be fruitfully supplemented by different sources of empirical research. Second, I put aidagara to work in the context of psychopathology. I show how disruptions of aidagara in schizophrenia not only affirm the foundational role (...)
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  2. Ontological Deprivation and the Dark Side of Fūdo.Joel Krueger - 2024 - Philosophy Today 68 (1):203-209.
  3. Selves beyond the skin: Watsuji, “betweenness”, and self-loss in solitary confinement and dementia.Joel Krueger - 2024 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 31 (5-6):127-150.
    I develop Tetsurō Watsuji’s relational model of the self as “betweenness”. I argue that Watsuji’s view receives support from two case studies: solitary confinement and dementia. Both clarify the constitutive interdependence between the self and the social and material contexts of “betweenness” that define its lifeworld. They do so by providing powerful examples of what happens when the support and regulative grounding of this lifeworld is restricted or taken away. I argue further that Watsuji’s view helps see the other side (...)
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  4. Reply to Laÿna Droz’s Review of Watsuji on Nature: Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger.David W. Johnson - 2023 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 9 (1):167-188.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: I would like to begin by thanking the Journal of Japanese Philosophy for making space in these pages for a review of my monograph Watsuji on Nature: Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger. Although book reviews do not usually receive a reply from the author—much less one as lengthy as the article that follows—one seemed necessary in this instance because my ideas, unfortunately, have been seriously mis-represented (...)
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  5. Watsuji on Nature: Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger by David W. Johnson.Steve Bein - 2022 - Philosophy East and West 72 (1):1-4.
    There is a certain irony in Japan's foremost secular philosopher grounding his ontology and ethics in a term so infamously unclear as fūdo 風土, given that the Japanese word for philosophy itself denotes "clear thinking." One might make the case that Watsuji's concept of fūdo cannot but be unclear, since he is responding to Heidegger's Being and Time, which is hardly the model of lucid philosophy. That said, it is the philosopher's responsibility to clarify the unclear, and that is the (...)
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  6. Finding (and losing) one’s way: autism, social impairments, and the politics of space.Joel Krueger - 2021 - Phenomenology and Mind 21:20-33.
    I use critical phenomenological resources in Tetsurō Watsuji and Sarah Ahmed to explore the spatial origin of some social impairments in Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD). I argue that a critical phenomenological perspective puts pressure on the idea that social impairments in ASD are exclusively (or even primarily) neurocognitive deficits that can be addressed by focusing on cognitive factors internal to the autistic person — for example, training them to adopt a more neurotypical approach to social cognition. Instead, I argue that (...)
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  7. Japan and the West: A Review of Thomas Kasulis’s Engaging Japanese Philosophy: A Short History. [REVIEW]John Krummel - 2021 - The Eastern Buddhist 49:231-247.
  8. Taking Watsuji online: Betweenness and expression in online spaces.Lucy Osler & Joel Krueger - 2021 - Continental Philosophy Review (1):1-23.
    In this paper, we introduce the Japanese philosopher Tetsurō Watsuji’s phenomenology of aidagara (“betweenness”) and use his analysis in the contemporary context of online space. We argue that Watsuji develops a prescient analysis anticipating modern technologically-mediated forms of expression and engagement. More precisely, we show that instead of adopting a traditional phenomenological focus on face-to-face interaction, Watsuji argues that communication technologies — which now include Internet-enabled technologies and spaces — are expressive vehicles enabling new forms of emotional expression, shared experiences, (...)
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  9. Disclosing Our Being-with-Others-in-the-Fūdo: A Review of Watsuji on Nature. Japanese Philosophy in the Wake of Heidegger. [REVIEW]Raquel Bouso - 2020 - Journal of World Philosophies 5 (2):183-188.
    David Johnson’s book introduces the enormous explanatory potential of Watsuji’s view of nature and one of his most original conceptual creations, fūdo, into the current philosophical discussion. Within the framework of phenomenology and hermeneutics, Johnson brings the idea that nature is part of the very structure of human existence into the limelight. In contrast to the value-free world of nature described by science, at least in a conventional and positivist sense, Watsuji’s nature is a meaningful setting in which subjective and (...)
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  10. Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):757-780.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current discussions in phenomenological (...)
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  11. Japanese Philosophers on Society and Culture: Nishida Kitaro, Watsuji Tetsuro, and Kuki Shuzo.Graham Mayeda - 2020 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    What is culture? What can we learn from art, architecture, and fashion about how people relate? Can cultures embody ethical and moral ideals? These are just some of the questions addressed in this book on the cultural philosophy of three preeminent Japanese philosophers of the early twentieth century, Nishida Kitarō, Watsuji Tetsurō and Kuki Shūzō.
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  12. Phenomenology and Japanese Philosophy.Andrea Altobrando & Shigeru Taguchi (eds.) - 2019 - Springer.
  13. Watsuji on nature: Japanese philosophy in the wake of Heidegger.David W. Johnson - 2019 - Evanston, Illinois: Northwestern University Press.
    "In the first study of its kind, David W. Johnson's "Watsuji on Nature" reconstructs the astonishing philosophy of nature of Watsuji Tetsurō (1889-1960), situating it in relation both to his reception of the thought of Heidegger and to his renewal of core ontological positions in classical Confucian and Buddhist philosophy. Johnson shows that for Watsuji we have our being in the lived experience of nature, one in which nature and culture compose a tightly interwoven texture called "fūdo". By fully unfolding (...)
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  14. Watsuji’s Idea of the Self and the Problem of Spatial Distance in Environmental Ethics.Laÿna Droz - 2018 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 3:145-168.
    Watsuji proposes a conception of the self as embodied and dynamic in constant cyclic relationship with the historical milieu. I argue that the concept of a relational individual can provide some solutions to the problem in environmental ethics of the spatial distance between an agent and the consequences of her actions. Indeed, by becoming aware of the interdependent relation between the self and the local shared milieu, one develops and recognizes feelings of care and belonging, which promote more environmentally sensitive (...)
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  15. The Philosophy of the Kyoto School.John Krummel - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Springer Publishing.
    This is an English translation of a book authored by Fujita Masakatsu. The main purpose of this book is to offer to philosophers and students abroad who show a great interest in Japanese philosophy and the philosophy of the Kyoto school major texts of the leading philosophers. This interest has surely developed out of a desire to obtain from the thought of these philosophers, who stood within the interstice between East and West, a clue to reassessing the issues of philosophy (...)
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  16. Le statut du végétal dans Fūdo de Watsuji.Quentin Hiernaux - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:159-177.
    Apres avoir introduit les concepts de base de Fūdo, je propose une interpretation du texte problematisee autour du statut de la vegetation. Il s’agira de montrer pourquoi et comment la place que tient la vegetation joue un role mediateur fondamental en tant que principe de premiere importance, y compris et surtout ici pour la vie humaine decrite par Watsuji. Ce faisant, l’objectif est double. D’une part, montrer, a la suite d’Augustin Berque, la coherence de la visee mesologique initiale de l’auteur (...)
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  17. Watsuji’s Ethics from the Perspective of Kata as a Technology of the Self.Jordančo Sekulovski - 2017 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2:199-208.
    This paper investigates the history of systems of thought different from those of the West. A closer look at Japan’s long philosophical tradition draws attention to the presence of uniquely designed acculturation and training techniques designed as kata or shikata, shedding light on kata as a generic technique of self-perfection and self-transformation. By seeing kata as foundational to the Japanese mind and comparing it to Michel Foucault’s research on technologies of the self, the groundwork is laid for a comparative analysis (...)
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  18. Descartes et la philosophie moderne au Japon. À travers Nishida, Watsuji et Miki.Tanigawa Takako - 2017 - In Pierre Bonneels & Jaime Derenne (eds.), Fortune de la philosophie cartésienne au Japon. Paris: Classiques Garnier. pp. 67-78.
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  19. Watsuji Tetsurō no shakaigaku.Yūichi Inukai - 2016 - Tōkyō-to Chiyoda-ku: Yachiyo Shuppan.
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  20. Fūdo as the Disclosure of Nature: Rereading Watsuji with Heidegger.David W. Johnson - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications. pp. 299-326.
  21. Watsuji’s topology of the self.David W. Johnson - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (3):216-240.
    This essay critically develops Watsuji’s nondual ontology of the self. Watsuji shows that the self is constituted by its relational contact with others and by its immersion in a wider geo-cultural environment. Yet Watsuji himself had difficulty in smoothly bringing together and integrating these notions. By showing how these domains work together to constitute the self, I bring into view the unity at the ground of Watsuji’s thought and the implications of this account for key ideas in Heidegger’s philosophy and (...)
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  22. Shedding Dōgen’s Light on Betweenness: What Watsuji Tetsurō’s Interpretation of the Shōbōgenzō Can Teach Us about His Ethics.Graham Mayeda - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications. pp. 327-362.
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  23. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy.Takeshi Morisato (ed.) - 2016 - Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications.
    The present volume is the latest example of what scholars of Japanese philosophy have been up to in recent years. The papers collected here, most of them presented at conferences held in Barcelona and Nagoya during 2016, have been arranged in four thematic parts. The first two parts cover the history of Japanese philosophy, as their topics extend from premodern thinkers to twentieth century philosophers; the last two parts focus on Nishida and Watsuji respectively.
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  24. Watsuji's Reading of Hegel: Modernity as a Philosophical Problem in Watsuji's Rinrigaku.Liederbach Hans Peter - 2016 - In Takeshi Morisato (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy 8: Critical Perspectives on Japanese Philosophy. Nagoya: Chisokudo Publications. pp. 384-420.
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  25. The Buddhist Roots of Watsuji Tetsurô's Ethics of Emptiness.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (4):606-635.
    Watsuji Tetsurô is famous for having constructed a systematic socio-political ethics on the basis of the idea of emptiness. This essay examines his 1938 essay “The Concept of ‘Dharma’ and the Dialectics of Emptiness in Buddhist Philosophy” and the posthumously published The History of Buddhist Ethical Thought, in order to clarify the Buddhist roots of his ethics. It aims to answer two main questions which are fundamentally linked: “Which way does Watsuji's legacy turn: toward totalitarianism or toward a balanced theory (...)
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  26. The Ethics of Engaged Pedagogy: A Comparative Study of Watsuji Tetsurô and bell hooks.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2016 - Kritike 10 (1):124-145.
    This article is a comparative study of bell hooks’s “engaged pedagogy” with Watsuji Tetsurô’s systematic ethics. The purpose of this comparison is twofold. The first reason is to examine the relational view of ethics that underlies hooks’s thought in order to explore her deliberately “un-academic” work in a philosophically rigorous way. The second reason is to examine the fundamental connections of Watsuji’s ethics of human existenceto an education for human becoming. This comparison will be carried out in two stages. First, (...)
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  27. Watsuji Tetsurō: jinkaku kara aidagara e.Keishi Miyagawa - 2015 - Tōkyō-to Bunkyō-ku: Kabushiki Kaisha Kōdansha.
    『古寺巡礼』の成功で確固たる地位を築いた和辻は、ハイデッガーや西田幾多郎など、同時代の哲学にも相対しつつ、独自の思考を展開する。仏教研究、日本思想史研究、倫理学と、多様かつ豊饒なその思想の本質とは、ど のようなものなのか。「人格」と「間柄」、そして「もの」と「こと」を解明の鍵として、「和辻倫理学」形成の現場を跡づけた力作!
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  28. "Nihon tetsugaku" nyūmon kōgi: Nishida Kitarō to Watsuji Tetsurō = Introductory lectures on Japanese philosophy.Masaki Nakamasa - 2015 - Tōkyō: Sakuhinsha.
    日本を代表する「思考の達人」“Meisterdenker”たちは如何にして、明治維新以降、輸入品ではない、日本固有の思考法・方法論を創りだしたのか?続々重版の大好評、入門講義シリーズ。日本に学問として の「哲学」を定着させるうえで決定的な役割を果たした西田幾多郎『善の研究』と日本的な「倫理学」の方法論を開拓したとされる和辻哲郎『人間の学としての倫理学』を熟読し、日本人の深層に在る思想を探る。.
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  29. Concretizing an Ethics of Emptiness: The Succeeding Volumes of Watsuji Tetsurô’s Ethics.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (1):82-101.
    Watsuji Tetsurô’s Ethics is one of the most important works in Japanese ethical thought. But scholarly research in English has largely focused on the first of three volumes of Ethics, leaving the latter two oft-neglected. In order to balance out the views of Watsuji’s ethics, this paper focuses on the contributions of the second and third volumes of Ethics. These volumes are essential for any concrete understanding of Watsuji’s ‘ethics of emptiness’. The second volume develops the ideas of the first, (...)
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  30. Watsuji’s Balancing Act.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2014 - Journal of Japanese Philosophy 2 (1):105-134.
    Watsuji Tetsuro-’s ethics is founded on the idea of the dual structure of human beings: that we are both individual and communal at the same time, and that these two elements constantly negate each other. But the interpretation of this structure shifts over the prewar, wartime, and postwar volumes. In the first volume, double negation is ambigu­ously explained as either an endless cycle that balances individuality and totality or a three-stage dialectic that privileges totality. Also, total­ity is seen as shaping (...)
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  31. Pilgrimages to the Ancient Temples in Nara [Koji junrei] by Watsuji Tetsurō.Laura Specker Sullivan - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (3):821-822.
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  32. The Kyoto School: An Introduction.Robert E. Carter & Thomas P. Kasulis - 2013 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    _An accessible discussion of the thought of key figures of the Kyoto School of Japanese philosophy._.
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  33. The space between us: embodiment and intersubjectivity in Watsuji and Levinas.Joel Krueger - 2013 - In Leah Kalmanson, Frank Garrett & Sarah Mattice (eds.), Levinas and Asian Thought. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: Duquesne University Press. pp. 53-78.
    This essay brings Emmanuel Levinas and Watsuji Tetsurō into constructive philosophical engagement. Rather than focusing primarily on interpretation — admittedly an important dimension of comparative philosophical inquiry — my intention is to put their respective views to work, in tandem, and address the problem of the embodied social self.1 Both Watsuji and Levinas share important commonalities with respect to the embodied nature of intersubjectivity —commonalities that, moreover, put both thinkers in step with some of the concerns driving current treatments of (...)
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  34. Watsuji's Phenomenology of Embodiment and Social Space.Joel Krueger - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2):127-152.
    The aim of this essay is to situate the thought of Tetsurō Watsuji within contemporary approaches to social cognition. I argue for Watsuji’s current relevance, suggesting that his analysis of embodiment and social space puts him in step with some of the concerns driving ongoing treatments of social cognition in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Yet, as I will show, Watsuji can potentially offer a fruitful contribution to this discussion by lending a phenomenologically informed critical perspective. This is because (...)
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  35. Creative Climate: Expressive Media in the Aesthetics of Watsuji, Nishida, and Merleau-Ponty.Lucy Schultz - 2013 - Environmental Philosophy 10 (1):63-81.
    In different ways, Watsuji, Nishida, and Merleau-Ponty describe a self that extends beyond the skin through a sort of dialectic of internal/external space of perception and action, which has implications for understanding the relationship between art and nature in artistic creation. Through an exposition of Watsuji’s conception of human being in relation to a climatic milieu, Nishida’s theory of the expressive body as the site of the world’s own self-transformations, and certain claims made by Merleau-Ponty in his essays on painting, (...)
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  36. Postures et Pratiques de L'homme: Libéralisme, philosophie non-standard et pensée japonaise.Jordanco Sekulovski - 2013 - Paris, France: L'Harmattan.
    POSTURES ET PRATIQUES DE L'HOMME Libéralisme, philosophie non-standard et pensée japonaise Jordanco SEKULOVSKI Nous, les sans-philosophie ASIE Japon -/- La philosophie véhicule des distinctions dualistes dont la conflictualité affaiblit gravement notre sentiment de solidarité humaine ; affronter la philosophie sur son propre terrain mène à une impasse, toute objection à son règne métaphysique devant, pour être reçue, se formuler dans les termes mêmes de la métaphysique... Il s'agit donc de changer de terrain, ou de chemin... L'auteur s'appuie sur le kâta (...)
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  37. Gaijin Philosophy and the Problems of Universality and Culture: Conversations with Kasulis, Watsuji, and Sakai.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2013 - In Hakusan Furusato Bungakushô dai 29 kai Akegarasu Haya Shô nyûsen ronbun. pp. 29-58.
    This essay examines how the standpoint of the gaijin (foreigner) shapes and challenges the act of philosophizing, through the experience of overwhelming cultural difference. I examine three challenges the foreigner faces—the need to understand a foreign culture, the need to contribute to a foreign culture, and the need for caution and self-awareness vis-à-vis the excesses and dangers of this attempt. -/- First, through a reading of Thomas Kasulis’ Intimacy or Integrity: Philosophy and Cultural Difference (2002), I take the reader through (...)
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  38. Community of No-Self: The Ethical-Existential Structure of Community in Watsuji Tetsurō and Jean-Luc Nancy.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2012 - In Applied Ethics: Theories, Methods and Cases. Center for Applied Ethics and Philosophy. pp. 48-61.
    This paper is an analysis of one theoretical facet of the problem of Buddhist participation in closed nationalist discourses: the essential relationship between the dislocation of subjectivity (or the emptying of ego) and the formation of communities (such as a nation-state or a Volk). Through this, I hope to explore the effects disciplines of subjectivity (including Buddhism) might have on socio-political formations (such as closed nationalism or imperialism). In order to do so, I will compare two key works in which (...)
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  39. Notes.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 143-160.
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  40. Acknowledgments.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press.
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  41. Notes on the Translation.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 21-22.
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  42. Bibliography.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 161-168.
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  43. Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen.Steve Bein (ed.) - 2011 - University of Hawaii Press.
    “Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen makes available in a clear and fluid translation an early classic in modern Japanese philosophy. Steve Bein’s annotations, footnotes, introduction, and commentary bridge the gap separating not only the languages but also the cultures of its original readers and its new Western audience.” —from the Foreword by Thomas P. Kasulis In 1223 the monk Dogen Kigen came to the audacious conclusion that Japanese Buddhism had become hopelessly corrupt. He undertook a dangerous pilgrimage to China (...)
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  44. Contents.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press.
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  45. Reading Shamon Dōgen: A Tourist’s Guide.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 119-142.
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  46. Frontmatter.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press.
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  47. Introductions.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 1-20.
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  48. Index.Steve Bein - 2011 - In Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Shamon Dogen. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 169-176.
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  49. Essays on japanese philosophy.Robert E. Carter - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):216-220.
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  50. Japanese Philosophy: A Sourcebook.James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis & John C. Maraldo - 2011 - University of Hawaiʻi Press.
    This is a set of essays and translations that covers comprehensively all of Japanese philosophy.
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