Technology Ethics

Edited by Hector MacIntyre (University of Lethbridge)
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  1. Book Review: A philosopher looks at digital communication by Onora O'Neill. [REVIEW]Aytac Ugur - 2023 - Metascience.
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  2. Oggetti buoni: Per una tecnologia sensibile ai valori.Steven Umbrello - 2023 - Rome: Fandango.
    Non possiamo immaginare un mondo senza le nostre tecnologie e i nostri strumenti. In molti modi, le nostre tecnologie sono ciò che ci definisce come esseri umani, separandoci dal resto del regno animale. Tuttavia, pensare alle nostre tecnologie come semplici strumenti, strumenti che possono essere usati nel bene o nel male, ci rende vulnerabili agli effetti sistemici e duraturi che le tecnologie hanno sulla nostra società, sui comportamenti, e sulle generazioni future. Oggetti Buoni esplora come le tecnologie incarnano i valori (...)
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  3. Book Review: A philosopher looks at digital communication by Onora O'Neill. [REVIEW]Ugur Aytac - 2023 - Metascience.
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  4. How Neurotech Start-Ups Envision Ethical Futures: Demarcation, Deferral, Delegation.Sebastian M. Pfotenhauer, Nina Frahm & Sophia Knopf - 2023 - Science and Engineering Ethics 29 (1):1-20.
    Like many ethics debates surrounding emerging technologies, neuroethics is increasingly concerned with the private sector. Here, entrepreneurial visions and claims of how neurotechnology innovation will revolutionize society—from brain-computer-interfaces to neural enhancement and cognitive phenotyping—are confronted with public and policy concerns about the risks and ethical challenges related to such innovations. But while neuroethics frameworks have a longer track record in public sector research such as the U.S. BRAIN Initiative, much less is known about how businesses—and especially start-ups—address ethics in tech (...)
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  5. Socially Assistive Devices in Healthcare–a Systematic Review of Empirical Evidence from an Ethical Perspective.Jochen Vollmann, Christoph Strünck, Annika Lucht & Joschka Haltaufderheide - 2023 - Science and Engineering Ethics 29 (1):1-23.
    Socially assistive devices such as care robots or companions have been advocated as a promising tool in elderly care in Western healthcare systems. Ethical debates indicate various challenges. An important part of the ethical evaluation is to understand how users interact with these devices and how interaction influences users’ perceptions and their ability to express themselves. In this review, we report and critically appraise findings of non-comparative empirical studies with regard to these effects from an ethical perspective.Electronic databases and other (...)
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  6. Rethinking techno-moral disruption in bioethics, society, and justice.Jon Rueda, Jonathan Pugh & Julian Savulescu - 2023 - Trends in Biotechnology.
    In response to De Proost and Segers, we provide further reflections on how technologies induce moral change. We discuss moral changes at the societal level as distinguished from changes in bioethical principles or ethical concepts, impacts on theories of justice, and whether the transformations are negative or positive.
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  7. Online Forums Can Alleviate the Care Crisis.Mahdi Khalili & Babaii Saeedeh - 2021 - Journal of Philosophical Investigations 16 (41):174-188.
    According to the care crisis in modern medicine, the existential needs of patients are not sufficiently satisfied. One idea is that to address the crisis physicians should be educated to be virtuous. This suggestion is helpful but incomplete. It does not take into account the part of (non-)human factors, including (medical) technologies. In particular, the paper focuses on online caring forums and argues that they are technological factors that can play the role of focal things, in which the members gather (...)
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  8. Justice in the Global Digital Economy.Johannes Himmelreich - forthcoming - In Axel Berger, Clara Brandi & Eszter Kollar (eds.), Justice in Global Economic Governance. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    This chapter outlines a framework for thinking about justice in the global digital economy. The chapter first proposes to understand the digital economy as about infrastructure, then describes some of the problems of justice raised by the global digital economy and sketches potential reforms.
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  9. The Soldier's Share: Considering Narrow Proportionality for Lethal Autonomous Weapons.Kevin Schieman - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics.
    Robert Sparrow (among others) claims that if an autonomous weapon were to commit a war crime, it would cause harm for which no one could reasonably be blamed. Since no one would bear responsibility for the soldier’s share of killing in such cases, he argues that they would necessarily violate the requirements of jus in bello, and should be prohibited by international law. I argue this view is mistaken and that our moral understanding of war is sufficient to determine blame (...)
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  10. How to do things with deepfakes.Tom Roberts - 2023 - Synthese 201 (2):1-18.
    In this paper, I draw a distinction between two types of deepfake, and unpack the deceptive strategies that are made possible by the second. The first category, which has been the focus of existing literature on the topic, consists of those deepfakes that act as a fabricated record of events, talk, and action, where any utterances included in the footage are not addressed to the audience of the deepfake. For instance, a fake video of two politicians conversing with one another. (...)
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  11. Correction: Domain Experts on Dementia-Care Technologies: Mitigating Risk in Design and Implementation.Jeffrey Kaye, George Demiris & Clara Berridge - 2023 - Science and Engineering Ethics 29 (1):1-2.
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  12. A Review of Scientific Ethics Issues Associated with the Recently Approved Drugs for Alzheimer’s Disease. [REVIEW]Bor Luen Tang & Nicole Shu Ling Yeo-Teh - 2023 - Science and Engineering Ethics 29 (1):1-18.
    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the devastating and most prevailing underlying cause for age-associated dementia, has no effective disease-modifying treatment. The last approved drug for the relief of AD symptoms was in 2003. The recent approval of sodium oligomannate (GV-971, 2019) in China and the human antibody aducanumab in the USA (ADUHELM, 2021) therefore represent significant breakthroughs, albeit ones that are fraught with controversy. Here, we explore potential scientific ethics issues associated with GV-971 and aducanumab’s development and approval. While these issues may (...)
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  13. In defense of xenotransplantation research: Because of, not in spite of, animal welfare concerns.Christopher Bobier, Daniel Rodger, Daniel J. Hurst & Adam Omelianchuk - forthcoming - Xenotransplantation.
    It is envisioned that one day xenotransplantation will bring about a future where transplantable organs can be safely and efficiently grown in transgenic pigs to help meet the global organ shortage. While recent advances have brought this future closer, worries remain about whether it will be beneficial overall. The unique challenges and risks posed to humans that arise from transplanting across the species barrier, in addition to the costs borne by non-human animals, has led some to question the value of (...)
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  14. The Value-Free Ideal of Science: A Useful Fiction? A Review of Non-epistemic Reasons for the Research Integrity Community.Jacopo Ambrosj, Kris Dierickx & Hugh Desmond - 2023 - Science and Engineering Ethics 29 (1):1-22.
    Even if the “value-free ideal of science” (VFI) were an unattainable goal, one could ask: can it be a useful fiction, one that is beneficial for the research community and society? This question is particularly crucial for scholars and institutions concerned with research integrity (RI), as one cannot offer normative guidance to researchers without making some assumptions about what ideal scientific research looks like. Despite the insofar little interaction between scholars studying RI and those working on values in science, the (...)
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  15. Epistemic fragmentation poses a threat to the governance of online targeting.Silvia Milano, Brent Mittelstadt, Sandra Wachter & Christopher Russell - 2021 - Nature Machine Intelligence 3 (June 2021):466–472.
    Online targeting isolates individual consumers, causing what we call epistemic fragmentation. This phenomenon amplifies the harms of advertising and inflicts structural damage to the public forum. The two natural strategies to tackle the problem of regulating online targeted advertising, increasing consumer awareness and extending proactive monitoring, fail because even sophisticated individual consumers are vulnerable in isolation, and the contextual knowledge needed for effective proactive monitoring remains largely inaccessible to platforms and external regulators. The limitations of both consumer awareness and of (...)
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  16. Meat we don't greet: How sausages can save pigs or how effacing livestock makes room for emancipation.Sophia Efstathiou - 2021 - In Arve Hansen & Karen Lykke Syse (eds.), Changing Meat Cultures: Food Practices, Global Capitalism, and the Consumption of Animals. pp. 102-112.
    I propose that the intensification of meat production ironically makes meat concepts available to be populated by plants. I argue that what I call “technologies of effacement” facilitate the intensification of animal farming and slaughter by blocking face-to-face encounters between animals and people (Levinas 1969; Efstathiou 2018, 2019). My previous ethnographic work on animal research identifies technologies of effacement as including (a) architectures and the built environment, (b) entry and exit rules, (c) special garments, (d) naming and labeling procedures, and (...)
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  17. Facing animal research: Levinas and technologies of effacement.Sophia Efstathiou - 2019 - In Peter Atterton & Tamra Wright (eds.), Face to face with animals: Levinas and the animal question. New York, NY, USA: pp. 139-163.
    This chapter proposes that encountering the Other through the face can be conditioned by social and built technologies. In “The Name of a Dog, or Natural Rights,” Emmanuel Levinas relates his experience as a prisoner of war, held in a forced-labor camp in Nazi Germany. He contrasts being denied his humanity by other humans, “called free” (DF, 152), while being recognized as human—indeed as a friend—by a dog the prisoners named Bobby. The episode suggests that though the concept of the (...)
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  18. Requirements and Philosophical Consequences of the Advertisement Industry in the Media.Alireza Mansouri - 2014 - Wisdom and Philosophy 10 (38):103-119.
    The cliché understanding of mass media is that they are tools and means to transmit news and expand communications whose function is to be informative, provide entertainment and promote ethical codes among people. This paper, mainly relying on the views and approaches of 'Heidegger' and 'Marx' about technology, aims to analyse the media and its relation with advertisement. This analysis has put under question the current common belief and shows that the advertisement industry implies a biased viewpoint toward the world, (...)
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  19. Geoengineering in a Climate of Uncertainty.Megan Blomfield - 2015 - In Jeremy Moss (ed.), Climate Change and Justice.
    Against the background of continuing inadequacy in global efforts to address climate change and apparent social and political inertia, ever greater interest is being generated in the idea that geoengineering may offer some solution to this problem. I do not take a position, here, on whether or not geoengineering could ever be morally justifiable. My goal in this paper is more modest – but also has broader implications. I aim to show that even if some form of geoengineering might be (...)
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  20. "fitting the description".Damien P. Williams - 2020 - Journal of Responsible Innovation 1 (7):74-83.
    It is increasingly evident that if researchers and policymakers want to meaningfully develop an understanding of responsible innovation, we must first ask whether some sociotechnical systems should be developed, at all. Here I argue that systems like facial recognition, predictive policing, and biometrics are predicated on myriad human prejudicial biases and assumptions which must be named and interrogated prior to any innovation. Further, the notions of individual responsibility inherent in discussions of technological ethics and fairness overburden marginalized peoples with a (...)
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  21. Healthspan extension, completeness of life and justice.Michal Masny - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Recent progress in geroscience holds the promise of significantly slowing down or even reversing ageing and age‐related diseases, and thus increasing our healthspans. In this paper, I offer a novel argument in favour of developing such technology and making it unconditionally available to everyone. In particular, I argue that justice requires that each person be provided with sufficient opportunities to have a ‘complete life’, that many people currently lack such opportunities, and that we would substantially improve the status quo by (...)
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  22. The Ethics of Supernumerary Robotic Limbs. An Enactivist Approach.Nicola Di Stefano, Nathanaël Jarrassé & Luca Valera - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-19.
    Supernumerary robotic limbs are innovative devices in the field of wearable robotics which can provide humans with unprecedented sensorimotor abilities. However, scholars have raised awareness of the ethical issues that would arise from the large adoption of technologies for human augmentation in society. Most negative attitudes towards such technologies seem to rely on an allegedly clear distinction between therapy and enhancement in the use of technological devices. Based on such distinction, people tend to accept technologies when used for therapeutic purposes (...)
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  23. Empowering the Research Community to Investigate Misconduct and Promote Research Integrity and Ethics: New Regulation in Scandinavia.Knut Jørgen Vie - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-19.
    Researchers sometimes engage in various forms of dishonesty and unethical behavior, which has led to regulatory efforts to ensure that they work according to acceptable standards. Such regulation is a difficult task, as research is a diverse and dynamic endeavor. Researchers can disagree about what counts as good and acceptable standards, and these standards are constantly developing. This paper presents and discusses recent changes in research integrity and ethics regulation in Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. Recognizing that research norms are developed (...)
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  24. The Ethics of ‘Deathbots’.Nora Freya Lindemann - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-15.
    Recent developments in AI programming allow for new applications: individualized chatbots which mimic the speaking and writing behaviour of one specific living or dead person. ‘Deathbots’, chatbots of the dead, have already been implemented and are currently under development by the first start-up companies. Thus, it is an urgent issue to consider the ethical implications of deathbots. While previous ethical theories of deathbots have always been based on considerations of the dignity of the deceased, I propose to shift the focus (...)
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  25. “Structural Ethics” as a Framework to Study the Moral Role of Non-Humans.Ehsan Arzroomchilar - 2022 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 26 (2):285-299.
    A challenging issue within the philosophy of technology is the moral relevancy of artifacts. While many philosophers agree that artifacts have moral significance, there are numerous positions on how moral relevancy ought to be understood, ranging from scholars who argue that there is no room for artifacts in moral debates to those who argue for the moral agency of artifacts. In this paper, I attempt to avoid extreme positions; accordingly, I reject both the neutrality thesis and the moral agency of (...)
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  26. The Soldier’s Share: Considering Narrow Responsibility for Lethal Autonomous Weapons.Kevin Schieman - 2023 - Journal of Military Ethics:1-18.
    Robert Sparrow (among others) claims that if an autonomous weapon were to commit a war crime, it would cause harm for which no one could reasonably be blamed. Since no one would bear responsibility for the soldier’s share of killing in such cases, he argues that they would necessarily violate the requirements of jus in bello, and should be prohibited by international law. I argue this view is mistaken and that our moral understanding of war is sufficient to determine blame (...)
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  27. The case for compulsory surgical smoke evacuation systems in the operating theatre.Daniel Rodger - 2022 - Clinical Ethics 17 (2):130-135.
    Perioperative staff are frequently exposed to surgical smoke or plume created by using heat-generating devices like diathermy and lasers. This is a concern due to mounting evidence that this exposure can be harmful with no safe level of exposure yet identified. First, I briefly summarise the problem posed by surgical smoke exposure and highlight that many healthcare organisations are not sufficiently satisfying their legal and ethical responsibilities to protect their staff from potential harm. Second, I explore the ethical case for (...)
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  28. Please Like This Paper.Lucy McDonald - 2021 - Philosophy 96 (3):335-358.
    In this paper I offer a philosophical analysis of the act of ‘liking’ a post on social media. First, I consider what it means to ‘like’ something. I argue that ‘liking’ is best understood as a phatic gesture; it signals uptake and anoints the poster’s positive face. Next, I consider how best to theorise the power that comes with amassing many ‘likes’. I suggest that ‘like’ tallies alongside posts institute and record a form of digital social capital. Finally, I consider (...)
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  29. Leadership and business ethics for technology students.Jennie Khun - 2023 - In Tamara Phillips Fudge (ed.), Exploring Ethical Problems in Today's Technological World. Engineering Science Reference.
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  30. Technoethics : an analysis of technological assessment and design efficacy.Jennifer Fleming - 2023 - In Tamara Phillips Fudge (ed.), Exploring Ethical Problems in Today's Technological World. Engineering Science Reference.
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  31. Technology innovation and adoption in the modern workplace : reasons for resistance, ethical concerns, reassurances, and when to say "no".Kelly Wibbenmeyer - 2023 - In Tamara Phillips Fudge (ed.), Exploring Ethical Problems in Today's Technological World. Engineering Science Reference.
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  32. Facial recognition technology : ethical and legal implication.Ellen Raineri, Erin Brennan & Audrey Ryder - 2023 - In Tamara Phillips Fudge (ed.), Exploring Ethical Problems in Today's Technological World. Engineering Science Reference.
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  33. Information and alterity : from probability to plasticity.Ashley Woodward - 2023 - In Natasha Lushetich, Iain Campbell & Dominic Smith (eds.), Contingency and Plasticity in Everyday Technologies. Rowman & Littlefield.
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  34. Contingency and plasticity in everyday technologies.Natasha Lushetich, Iain Campbell & Dominic Smith (eds.) - 2023 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
    This book theorises technology and its host of social, material, and epistemic transformation techniques, tools, and methods as indeterminate through sixteen methodologically diverse contributions from media philosophy, art and architectural theory, mathematics, computer science, and anthropology scholars.
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  35. Correction: Community Heroes and Sleeping Members: Interdependency of the Tenets of Energy Justice.Mandi Astola, Erik Laes, Gunter Bombaerts, Bozena Ryszawska, Magdalena Rozwadowska, Piotr Szymanski, Anja Ruess, Sophie Nyborg & Meiken Hansen - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-2.
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  36. On the (Non-)Rationality of Human Enhancement and Transhumanism.David M. Lyreskog & Alex McKeown - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-18.
    The human enhancement debate has over the last few decades been concerned with ethical issues in methods for improving the physical, cognitive, or emotive states of individual people, and of the human species as a whole. Arguments in favour of enhancement defend it as a paradigm of rationality, presenting it as a clear-eyed, logical defence of what we stand to gain from transcending the typical limits of our species. If these arguments are correct, it appears that adults should in principle (...)
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  37. The Fair Chances in Algorithmic Fairness: A Response to Holm.Clinton Castro & Michele Loi - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-7.
    Holm (2022) argues that a class of algorithmic fairness measures, that he refers to as the ‘performance parity criteria’, can be understood as applications of John Broome’s Fairness Principle. We argue that the performance parity criteria cannot be read this way. This is because in the relevant context, the Fairness Principle requires the equalization of actual individuals’ individual-level chances of obtaining some good (such as an accurate prediction from a predictive system), but the performance parity criteria do not guarantee any (...)
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  38. The Call of the Hoatzin: Ecology, Evolution, and Eugenics at the Bronx Zoo.Katherine McLeod - 2022 - Centaurus 64 (3):683-704.
    From 1908 to 1922, William Beebe, the curator of birds at the Bronx Zoo, tried unsuccessfully to bring tropical birds known as hoatzin to the zoological park in the Bronx run by the New York Zoological Society. Beebe was committed to bringing hoatzin to the zoo because he thought they could reveal scientific truths about ecology and evolution to him and the visiting public. While contemporary scholarship about zoo science in the United States has focused on how environmental conservation shaped (...)
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  39. Global Catastrophic Risk and the Drivers of Scientist Attitudes Towards Policy.Christopher Nathan & Keith Hyams - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-18.
    An anthropogenic global catastrophic risk is a human-induced risk that threatens sustained and wide-scale loss of life and damage to civilisation across the globe. In order to understand how new research on governance mechanisms for emerging technologies might assuage such risks, it is important to ask how perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes towards the governance of global catastrophic risk within the research community shape the conduct of potentially risky research. The aim of this study is to deepen our understanding of emerging (...)
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  40. Martin Heidegger’s ‘Dasein’ in an Emerging Digital Ecology.Ben van Lier - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-24.
    We are currently in the middle of the transformation from Martin Heidegger’s modern society to a society based on digital technology. In the developing digital society, humans in their current state of ‘Being’ are increasingly surrounded by systems that are networked and run based on algorithms, software, and data. These interconnected systems function, communicate, and interact in networks and driven by these algorithms, software, and data, which give them the ability to connect, calculate, and reveal. Jointly, these systems thus create (...)
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  41. Equity in AgeTech for Ageing Well in Technology-Driven Places: The Role of Social Determinants in Designing AI-based Assistive Technologies.Giovanni Rubeis, Mei Lan Fang & Andrew Sixsmith - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-15.
    AgeTech involves the use of emerging technologies to support the health, well-being and independent living of older adults. In this paper we focus on how AgeTech based on artificial intelligence (AI) may better support older adults to remain in their own living environment for longer, provide social connectedness, support wellbeing and mental health, and enable social participation. In order to assess and better understand the positive as well as negative outcomes of AI-based AgeTech, a critical analysis of ethical design, digital (...)
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  42. Ecocentrism and Biosphere Life Extension.Karim Jebari & Anders Sandberg - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-19.
    The biosphere represents the global sum of all ecosystems. According to a prominent view in environmental ethics, ecocentrism, these ecosystems matter for their own sake, and not only because they contribute to human ends. As such, some ecocentrists are critical of the modern industrial civilization, and a few even argue that an irreversible collapse of the modern industrial civilization would be a good thing. However, taking a longer view and considering the eventual destruction of the biosphere by astronomical processes, we (...)
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  43. Joint Interaction and Mutual Understanding in Social Robotics.Sebastian Schleidgen & Orsolya Friedrich - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-20.
    Social robotics aims at designing robots capable of joint interaction with humans. On a conceptual level, sufficient mutual understanding is usually said to be a necessary condition for joint interaction. Against this background, the following questions remain open: in which sense is it legitimate to speak of human–robot joint interaction? What exactly does it mean to speak of humans and robots sufficiently understanding each other to account for human–robot joint interaction? Is such joint interaction effectively possible by reference, e.g., to (...)
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  44. Perceptions of Pharmacy Graduate Students Toward Research Ethics Education: A Cross-Sectional Study from a Developing Country.Wesam S. Ahmed, Amgad Ahmed, Karem H. Alzoubi & Camille Nebeker - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (6):1-18.
    Despite the potential value of graduate-level research ethics training, most Middle East countries, including Jordan, do not routinely offer formal research ethics training. In students enrolled in Jordanian master’s level graduate program in pharmacy, the current study assessed: 1- differences in pre- and post-enrollment exposure to research ethics core themes, 2- whether this exposure was through a formal course or in an informal setting, and 3- student attitudes towards research ethics education and the need for integrating a dedicated research ethics (...)
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  45. Present shock: when everything happens now.Douglas Rushkoff - 2013 - New York, New York, U.S.A.: Current.
    An award-winning author explores how the world works in our age of "continuous now" Back in the 1970s, futurism was all the rage. But looking forward is becoming a thing of the past. According to Douglas Rushkoff, "presentism" is the new ethos of a society that's always on, in real time, updating live. Guided by neither history nor long term goals, we navigate a sea of media that blend the past and future into a mash-up of instantaneous experience. Rushkoff shows (...)
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  46. Généalogies philosophique, politique et imaginaire de la technoscience.Gilbert Hottois - 2013 - Paris: Librairie philosophique J. Vrin.
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  47. Philosophie de la machine: néo-mécanisme et post-humanisme.Gérard Chazal - 2013 - Dijon: Éditions Universitaires de Dijon.
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  48. Imaging Technologies.Don Ihde - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  49. Critical Theory of Technology.Andrew Feenberg - 2012 - In Jan Kyrre Berg Olsen Friis, Stig Andur Pedersen & Vincent F. Hendricks (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Technology. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  50. Tecnica.Maria Teresa Pansera - 2013 - Napoli: Guida.
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1 — 50 / 6319