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  1. Subjectivity in Film: Mine, Yours, and No One's.Sara Aronowitz & Grace Helton - forthcoming - Ergo.
    A classic and fraught question in the philosophy of film is this: when you watch a film, do you experience yourself in the world of the film, observing the scenes? In this paper, we argue that this subject of film experience is sometimes a mere impersonal viewpoint, sometimes a first-personal but unindexed subject, and sometimes a particular, indexed subject such as the viewer herself or a character in the film. We first argue for subject pluralism: there is no single answer (...)
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  2. Is thermodynamics subjective?Katie Robertson & Carina Prunkl - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science:1-16.
    Thermodynamics is an unusual theory. Prominent figures, including J.C. Maxwell and E.T. Jaynes, have suggested that thermodynamics is anthropocentric. Additionally, contemporary approaches to quantum thermodynamics label thermodynamics a ‘subjective theory’. Here, we evaluate some of the strongest arguments for anthropocentrism based on the heat/work distinction, the second law, and the nature of entropy. We show that these arguments do not commit us to an anthropocentric view but instead point towards a resource-relative understanding of thermodynamics which can be shorn of the (...)
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  3. The Strange Nature of Quantum Entanglement: Can Observers of Entangled Photons Become Entangled With Each Other?Steven M. Rosen - 2023 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 44 (3 and 4):157-170.
    This paper seeks to extend my recent work on quantum perception (Rosen, 2021) to the phenomenon of quantum entanglement. In the first section, I summarize the earlier work, noting how the conventional approach to observing photons is rooted in an objectivist philosophy that serves as an obstacle to probing the underlying quantum reality. In the summary provided, I bring out the intimate relationship between observer and observed in the quantum world, and the need for a new, proprioceptive mode of observation (...)
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  4. The Objective Status of Subjective Facts.Howard Sankey - 2023 - Metaphysica: International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics 24 (2):175-179.
    Some facts are objective. Some facts are subjective. Subjective facts are personal facts about individuals. It is the purpose of this short note to suggest that subjective facts are in fact objective facts about us. This applies not just to facts involving relations to entities that are independent of us, but to our tastes. It is an objective fact about us that we have the tastes that we do though there may be no objective matter of fact that our tastes (...)
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  5. The Appearance of Authority in Health and Wellbeing Media: Analysing Digital Guru Media through Lacan's 'big Other'.Jack Black - 2022 - In Stefan Lawrence (ed.), Digital Wellness, Health and Fitness Influencers: Critical Perspectives on Digital Guru Media. Routledge. pp. 33-51.
    Alongside the increasing popularity of digital, ‘social’ media platforms, has been the emergence of self-styled digital life-coaches, many of whom seek to propagate their knowledge of and interests in a variety of topics through online social networks (such as, Facebook, Youtube, Instagram, etc.). With many of these ‘social influencers’ garnering a large online following, their popularity, social significance and cultural impact offers important insights into the place and purpose of the subject in our digital media environment. Accordingly, this chapter will (...)
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  6. Objective description in physics.Hans Halvorson - 2022 - In Tomas Marvan, Hanne Andersen, Hasok Chang, Benedikt Löwe & Ivo Pezlar (eds.), Proceedings of the 16th International Congress of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science and Technology. London: College Publications.
    I argue against the claim -- advocated by Albert Einstein, Bernard Williams, and Ted Sider, among others -- that a description is objective only if it says how the world is in itself. Instead, I argue for the claim -- inspired by comments of Niels Bohr -- that a family of descriptions is objective only if they co-vary with their respective descriptive contexts. Moreover, I claim that "there is a shared objective reality" simply means that it is possible to satisfy (...)
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  7. Objective Facts.Howard Sankey - 2022 - Metaphysica: International Journal for Ontology and Metaphysics 23 (1):117-121.
    This is a brief exploration of the notion of an objective fact. The form of objectivity at issue is distinct from epistemic objectivity or objectivity about truth. It is an ontological form of objectivity. Objective facts may obtain whether or not we know, believe or are aware of them. They depend upon objects, for example, on the properties that objects have or the relationships into which objects enter. Setting scepticism to one side, there is a perfectly mundane sense in which (...)
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  8. O sujeito anímico e o sujeito espiritual em Ideias II.Nathalie de la Cadena - 2021 - Revista de Abordagem Gestáltica 27 (3):339-347.
    Neste artigo pretendo evidenciar como a relação entre sujeito anímico e sujeito espiritual é fundamental para a compreensão da intersubjetividade e do mundo da vida (Lebenswelt). Em Ideias II, Husserl explica como, a partir do eu, sujeito e objeto são constituídos no mundo: natureza, alma e espírito. Estes três estratos do sendo são conhecidos a partir da atitude teorética e da atitude espiritual e, no processo, se dá a explicitação do eu. Numa atitude teorética, temos constituição da natureza, para o (...)
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  9. Objectivity in Science.Stephen John - 2021 - Cambridge University Press.
    Objectivity is a key concept both in how we talk about science in everyday life and in the philosophy of science. This Element explores various ways in which recent philosophers of science have thought about the nature, value and achievability of objectivity. The first section explains the general trend in recent philosophy of science away from a notion of objectivity as a 'view from nowhere' to a focus on the relationship between objectivity and trust. Section 2 discusses the relationship between (...)
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  10. Artistic Objectivity: From Ruskin’s ‘Pathetic Fallacy’ to Creative Receptivity.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):505-526.
    While the idea of art as self-expression can sound old-fashioned, it remains widespread—especially if the relevant ‘selves’ can be social collectives, not just individual artists. But self-expression can collapse into individualistic or anthropocentric self-involvement. And compelling successor ideals for artists are not obvious. In this light, I develop a counter-ideal of creative receptivity to basic features of the external world, or artistic objectivity. Objective artists are not trying to express themselves or reach collective self-knowledge. However, they are also not disinterested (...)
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  11. Objectivity, perceptual constancy, and teleology in young children.Uwe Peters - 2021 - Mind and Language 37 (5):975-992.
    Can young children such as 3-year-olds represent the world objectively? Some prominent developmental psychologists—such as Perner and Tomasello—assume so. I argue that this view is susceptible to a prima facie powerful objection: To represent objectively, one must be able to represent not only features of the entities represented but also features of objectification itself, which 3-year-olds cannot do yet. Drawing on Burge's work on perceptual constancy, I provide a response to this objection and motivate a distinction between three different kinds (...)
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  12. The Strange Nature of Quantum Perception: To See a Photon, One Must Be a Photon.Steven M. Rosen - 2021 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 42 (3, 4):229-270.
    This paper takes as its point of departure recent research into the possibility that human beings can perceive single photons. In order to appreciate what quantum perception may entail, we first explore several of the leading interpretations of quantum mechanics, then consider an alternative view based on the ontological phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Martin Heidegger. Next, the philosophical analysis is brought into sharper focus by employing a perceptual model, the Necker cube, augmented by the topology of the Klein bottle. (...)
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  13. The Fragile Strength of a Dissolving Subjectivity.José A. Zamora - 2021 - Krisis 41 (2):60-62.
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  14. Idols of the Mind vs. True Reality.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2020 - Princeton, NJ, USA: Bhakti Vedanta Institute of Spiritual Culture and Science.
    “It is probably justified in requiring a transformation of the image of the real world as it has been constructed in the last 300 years… [for] now it seems to work no longer. One must therefore go back 300 years and reflect on how one could have proceeded differently at that time, and how the whole subsequent development would then be modified. No wonder that puts us into boundless confusion!” :: a letter from Schrödinger to Einstein in 1950 -/- The (...)
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  15. Science as Social Existence: Heidegger and the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers.
    REVIEW (1): "Jeff Kochan’s book offers both an original reading of Martin Heidegger’s early writings on science and a powerful defense of the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK) research program. Science as Social Existence weaves together a compelling argument for the thesis that SSK and Heidegger’s existential phenomenology should be thought of as mutually supporting research programs." (Julian Kiverstein, in Isis) ---- REVIEW (2): "I cannot in the space of this review do justice to the richness and range of Kochan's (...)
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  16. The physiology of the sense organs and early neo-Kantian conceptions of objectivity.Scott Edgar - 2015 - In Flavia Padovani, Alan Richardson & Jonathan Y. Tsou (eds.), Objectivity in Science: New Perspectives From Science and Technology Studies. Cham: Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science, vol. 310. Springer. pp. 101-122.
  17. Objective Styles in Northern Field Science.Jeff Kochan - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 52:1-12.
    Social studies of science have often treated natural field sites as extensions of the laboratory. But this overlooks the unique specificities of field sites. While lab sites are usually private spaces with carefully controlled borders, field sites are more typically public spaces with fluid boundaries and diverse inhabitants. Field scientists must therefore often adapt their work to the demands and interests of local agents. I propose to address the difference between lab and field in sociological terms, as a difference in (...)
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  18. Individuality, Individuation, Subjectivity in Early Modern Philosophy.Andrea Strazzoni (ed.) - 2015 - Arad: „Vasile Goldiş” University Press.
    For generations of scholars the emergence of the notion of human subjectivity has marked the shift to philosophical modernity. Mainly traced back to Descartes’s founding of philosophy on the Cogito and to Kant’s ‘Copernican Revolution’, the rise of subjectivity has been linked to the rise of the modern age in terms of a reconsideration of reality starting from an analysis of the human self and consciousness. Consequently, it has been related to long-standing issues of identity, individuation and individuality as a (...)
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  19. Subjectivity and Emotion in Scientific Research.Jeff Kochan - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):354-362.
    A persistent puzzle for philosophers of science is the well-documented appeal made by scientists to their aesthetic emotions in the course of scientific research. Emotions are usually viewed as irremediably subjective, and thus of no epistemological interest. Yet, by denying an epistemic role for scientists’ emotional dispositions, philosophers find themselves in the awkward position of ignoring phenomena which scientists themselves often insist are of importance. This paper suggests a possible solution to this puzzle by challenging the wholesale identification of emotion (...)
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  20. Le premesse del discorso sulla soggettività nell’età moderna: il dibattito cartesiano.Andrea Strazzoni - 2013 - I Quaderni Della Ginestra 8 (1):6-13.
    Il discorso moderno e contemporaneo sulla soggettività prende le mosse dall'opera di René Descartes (1596-1650), universalmente considerato l'iniziatore della filosofia moderna. Improntata ad un severo meccanicismo, la filosofia di Descartes nasce come un tentativo di sostituzione della fisica aristotelica nel curriculum universitario dell’epoca. La fisica, secondo l'ordine degli studi delle università a cavallo fra ‘500 e ‘600, costituito dalle discipline filosofiche e letterarie del trivio e del quadrivio, e da quelle superiori di medicina, diritto e teologia, doveva servire quale premessa (...)
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  21. Perception: Or the Thing and Deception.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2012 - The Harmonizer.
    Consciousness in the form of sense-certainty wants to apprehend its particular object as being-there (existing). But as demonstrated in previous articles in this series, the only truth of sense-certainty is merely that something is, and because everything is, being is universal. Here it will be shown that perception is the consciousness of the universal as the truth of a particular being. And because universality is the very principle of perception, both object and the I are also universal. Because this universality (...)
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  22. Summary of the Development of Consciousness from Sense-certainty to Perception and then to Understanding.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2012 - The Harmonizer.
    In Sense-certainty, the being of the particular object of sense was found to belong to the universality - of consciousness. This relationship between the universal truth of the object and its sensuous determinate particularity is called the Thing of Perception, basically a Thing and its perceived properties. However, in perception it was concluded that the particular Thing is ultimately resolved into the unconditioned universality of the Understanding. Thus in both Sense-certainty and Perception the particular object or Thing proves to be (...)
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  23. What Moments of Thought Constitute the Activity of Perception?Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2012 - The Harmonizer.
    There are two sides to perceptual consciousness: consciousness and the Thing. Thus far the various thought-components constituent of theThing (the various moments of the Concept of Thing) have been observed. Now it is necessary to consider what thoughts consciousness, itself, experiences in the act of perceiving.
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  24. Boundaries, Reasons, and Relativism.Michael P. Wolf - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:205-220.
    During the latter half of the twentieth century, many philosophers in Europe and America turned towards social pragmatist and holistic accounts of concepts and theories. In this paper, I make the case that many forms of relativism—moral and otherwise—that emerge from this turn are misguided. While we must always operate from some framework of practices in which things may serve as reasons for us, most forms of relativism in recent decades have more boldly granted us immunity from external rational scrutiny. (...)
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  25. Difference between Argumentative and Conceptual Thinking.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2011 - The Harmonizer.
    Argumentative thinking has two aspects, viz. positive and negative. Such thinking effectively ignores the content since the actual object is considered “out there” beyond the subjective thinking that is going on “in here” or inside oneself or the finite mind. No explicit connection is established between the subjective and objective worlds or realms. This type of thinking is of necessity concerned only with its own knowing or with itself, thus Hegel calls this vanity. In this sense it is indifferent to (...)
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  26. Scientific Platform of Knowing or Absolute Knowing.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2011 - The Harmonizer.
    Progress in philosophy means to understand and accept one point and from there go on to develop the next. The whole is made up of many parts just as a building is composed of many floors – we cannot take out one or more of the beginning floors and expect that the building can thereby be erected. The overall system of Hegel’s philosophy requires an understanding of each of the parts within it, especially the beginning steps. In the earlier articles (...)
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  27. Self-consciousness in the Form of Sense Certainty.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2011 - The Harmonizer.
    The object of study is consciousness. The activity of consciousness is called knowing. The study of a subject may only begin with immediacy, because a beginning implies that there is no prior mediation, i.e. no explicit differences or determinations. Such a beginning is mere being — what immediately is. Being as such is pure generality. Since consciousness is not a physical object that appears before the eyes like a tree, it has to be treated as an object of thought or, (...)
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  28. The Truthful Comprehension of Reality.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2011 - The Harmonizer.
    The objective here will be to take the subject (ego) and object (thing) that are held fixed, separate and in opposition to each other by the understanding and explicitly show them to be dialectically related in the dynamical movement of thinking. The dialectical movement of thought was explained by example in the propositional statement, S is P. The movement of the unified Concept as a whole, in which the fixed subject and object are considered as mere moments, constitutes the basic (...)
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  29. Scientific Objectivity and E. B. Titchener's Experimental Psychology.Christopher Green - 2010 - Isis 101:697-721.
  30. Subject and Object: The Principle of Distinction and Inseparability.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2010 - The Harmonizer.
    One of the most important instances of distinct but inseparable entities is that of subject and object. When we carefully think about them, we realize that one term implies the other. In other words, a subject cannot possibly exist without a corresponding object otherwise we would never be able to talk about “subject.” In a similar way, an object can only be called an object because it is in relation to a subject. All opposites will in fact exhibit this same (...)
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  31. An Introduction to the Science of Subjectivity.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2010 - The Harmonizer.
    We may call this the problem of thought and being, where thought represents the subjective and being the objective component in this interactive event. In order to resolve this problem we have to look more carefully at the situation to make sure we understand what is going on more clearly. Let us take the example of "seeing" as something that may be easier to understand. Between (1) "seeing" and the (2) "thing seen" we may at first think we have two (...)
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  32. A Scientific Understanding of Concept.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2010 - The Harmonizer.
    Hegel considers the Concept (in German Begriffe) to be a spiritual entity - the soul, if you will, of a thing. Looked at in another way it may be considered (although not precisely) like the essence of a thing. It is what makes the thing whatever it is. Thus if we took the Concept of a room (let’s say “roomness”) away from a thing we would no longer have a room but something else. In this sense the Concept is essential (...)
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  33. Connection between Determination and Negation.Bhakti Madhava Puri - 2010 - The Harmonizer.
    Niels Bohr gave us the model of the atom as having a central nucleus around which electrons were circulating in stable orbits. He also gave us the complementarity principle that states that the mutually exclusive wave and corpuscular nature of light were not merely contradictory but complementary descriptions. Field theory considers light as a continuous wave phenomenon with a wavelength and frequency, while quantum theory considers its corpuscular nature as a discrete packet of energy called a photon. Thus we actually (...)
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  34. Introduction (FOCUS: THE EMOTIONAL ECONOMY OF SCIENCE).Paul White - 2009 - Isis 100:792-797.
  35. Paul Natorp and the emergence of anti-psychologism in the nineteenth century.Scott Edgar - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):54-65.
    This paper examines the anti-psychologism of Paul Natorp, a Marburg School Neo-Kantian. It identifies both Natorp’s principle argument against psychologism and the views underlying the argument that give it its force. Natorp’s argument depends for its success on his view that certain scientific laws constitute the intersubjective content of knowledge. That view in turn depends on Natorp’s conception of subjectivity, so it is only against the background of his conception of subjectivity that his reasons for rejecting psychologism make sense. This (...)
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  36. Where do the limits of experience lie? Abandoning the dualism of objectivity and subjectivity.Christian Greiffenhagen & Wes Sharrock - 2008 - History of the Human Sciences 21 (3):70-93.
    The relationship between 'subjective' and 'objective' features of social reality (and between 'subjectivist' and 'objectivist' sociological approaches) remains problematic within social thought. Phenomenology is often taken as a paradigmatic example of subjectivist sociology, since it supposedly places exclusive emphasis on actors' 'subjective' interpretations, thereby neglecting 'objective' social structures. In this article, we question whether phenomenology is usefully understood as falling on either side of the standard divides, arguing that phenomenology's conception of 'subjective' experience of social reality includes many features taken (...)
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  37. Realism, Reliabilism, and the 'Strong Programme' in the Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Jeff Kochan - 2008 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):21 – 38.
    In this essay, I respond to Tim Lewens's proposal that realists and Strong Programme theorists can find common ground in reliabilism. I agree with Lewens, but point to difficulties in his argument. Chief among these is his assumption that reliabilism is incompatible with the Strong Programme's principle of symmetry. I argue that the two are, in fact, compatible, and that Lewens misses this fact because he wrongly supposes that reliabilism entails naturalism. The Strong Programme can fully accommodate a reliabilism which (...)
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  38. El sujeto humano desde la dimensión personal y la libertad.Juan Ramón Fuentes Jiménez - 2006 - Studium Ovetense. Revista Del Centro Superior de Estudios Teológicos de Oviedo 33 (Antropología filosófica):71-106.
    El presente trabajo analiza al ser humano desde dos dimensiones, la persona y la libertad con el objetivo de ofrecer una idea de humanidad fundada en la construcción de la persona desde su libertad.
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  39. Psychology as a Moral Science: Aspects of John Dewey’s Psychology.Svend Brinkmann - 2004 - History of the Human Sciences 17 (1):1-28.
    The article presents an interpretation of certain aspects of John Dewey’s psychological works. The interpretation aims to show that Dewey’s framework speaks directly to certain problems that the discipline of psychology faces today. In particular the reflexive problem, the fact that psychology as an array of discursive practices has served to constitute forms of human subjectivity in Western cultures. Psychology has served to produce or transform its subject-matter. It is shown first that Dewey was aware of the reflexive problem, and (...)
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  40. A Strong Distinction between Humans and Non-Humans is no Longer Required for Research Purposes: A Debate Between Bruno Latour and Steve Fuller.Colin Barron - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):77-99.
    The second International Knowledge and Discourse Conference, held at the University of Hong Kong in June 2002, was the forum for the long-awaited debate between Bruno Latour and Steve Fuller. Bruno Latour counts beyond two. He places the blame for the emphasis in academia on the subject-object distinction on Kant. Latour wants academics to acknowledge that things act, and suggests we look at other traditions, e.g. the Chinese, for alternatives to the subject-object dichotomy. Steve Fuller concentrated on the moral project (...)
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  41. The 'philosophical grasp of the appearances' and experimental microscopy: Johannes Muller's microscopical research, 1824-1832.J. Schickore - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 34 (4):569-592.
    Romantic Naturphilosophie has been at the centre of almost every account of early nineteenth-century sciences, be it as an obstacle or as an aid for scientific advancement. The following paper suggests a change of perspective. I seek to read Naturphilosophie as one manifestation among others of a more general concern with the question of how experience enables the subject to acquire knowledge about objects. To illustrate such an approach, I focus on Johannes Muller's early work. Here one finds two contrasting (...)
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  42. Nagel on imagination and physicalism.Torin Alter - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:143-58.
    In "What is it Like to be a Bat?" Thomas Nagel argues that we cannot imagine what it is like to be a bat or presently understand how physicalism might be true. Both arguments have been seriously misunderstood. I defend them against various objections, point out a problem with the argument against physicalism, and show how the problem can be solved.
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  43. Descartes' Hypothesenbegriff im Discours de la méthode und in den Principia philosophiae.Gregor Schiemann - 1996 - In Allgemeine Gesellschaft für Philosophie (ed.), Cognitio humana - Dynamik des Wissens und der Werte. XVIII. Deutscher Kongreß für Philosophie. Leibzig.
    Bei den korpuskulartheoretischen Erklärungen von Naturphänomenen, wie sie Descartes in den Principia philosophiae vornimmt und im Discours de la methode anspricht, lassen sich zwei verschiedene und nur teilweise miteinander vereinbare Bedeutungsgruppen des Hypothesenbegriffs nachweisen. Sie verbinden sich mit unterschiedlichen Bewertungen des Status von Hypothesen im wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnisprozeß. Einerseits findet man eine Verwandtschaft zum heute wissenschaftstheoretisch verbreiteten Verständnis von Hypothesen als positivem und integralem Bestandteil der Naturerkenntnis. Typischer für Descartes' Naturphilosophie ist jedoch die andererseits von ihm vertretene Vorstellung, daß der Umfang (...)
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  44. Reviews : Judith Ryan, The Vanishing Subject: Early Psychology and Literary Modernism. London: University of Chicago Press, 1991. x + 267 pp. [REVIEW]N. F. Bunnin - 1992 - History of the Human Sciences 5 (4):87-89.
  45. 'Psychological man' and human subjectivity in historical perspective.Irmingard Staeuble - 1991 - History of the Human Sciences 4 (3):417-432.
  46. Fichtes Beitrag zur Ausbildung einer dialektischen Naturbetrachtung.Stahl Jürgen - 1985 - In Erhard Lange (ed.), Collegium philosophicum Jenense Nr 5. Philosophie und Natur. Beiträge zur Naturphilosophie der deutschen Klassik. Weimar, Deutschland: Hermann Böhlau Nachfolger. pp. 146 -155.
    Der Artikel verfolgt, in welcher Weise Johann Gottlieb Fichte mit seiner Wissenschaftslehre die Diskussion um das Wesen der Natur in ihrem Verhältnis zum Subjekt beeinflusst. Dabei wird besonders sein Ansatz zur Fassung der Subjektivität und der Dialektisierung der Erkenntnisbeziehung zwischen Subjekt und Objekt herausgearbeitet. Dabei wird Fichtes Beitrag zur Entwicklung einer modernen dialektischen Methode gewürdigt. -/- The article follows the way in which Johann Gottlieb Fichte influences the discussion about the essence of nature in its relationship to the subject with (...)
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  47. Theory-Ladenness and Theory Comparison.William B. Jones - 1978 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:83 - 92.
    Conditions are set forth which, if satisfied, would provide a rational basis for believing, even in a context in which observation is theory-laden, that (1) the two theories are rivals and (2) one of them enjoys observational support that is superior to that enjoyed by the other.
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  48. The Edge of Objectivity: An Essay in the History of Scientific Ideas. [REVIEW]Stephen Toulmin - 1961 - Philosophical Review 70 (4):557-559.
  49. The Edge of Objectivity. An Essay in the History of Scientific Ideas by Charles Coulston Gillispie. [REVIEW]A. Hall - 1960 - Isis 51:344-347.
  50. Origins of Objectivity.David L. Thompson - manuscript
    Tomasello offers an evolutionary, palaeoanthropological account of the human origin of objects and objectivity. Husserl gives a phenomenological account of the constitution of objects by intersubjectivity. Comparing the two, I claim that Tomasello’s “naturalized” approach closely parallels Husserl’s transcendental approach.
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