Sound

Edited by Casey O'Callaghan (Washington University in St. Louis)
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200 found
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  1. Doing a Double Take: (Further) Against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes.Jeff Hawley - manuscript
    Presented at Philosophy Across Disciplines Conference 2021, Newcastle University. -/- As noted by philosopher Robert Pasnau, “our standard view of sound is incoherent” at best. A quick perusal of how we discuss and represent sound in our day-to-day language readily highlights a number of inconsistencies. Sound might be described roughly as emanating from the location of its material source (the ‘crack of the snare drum over there’ distal theory), as a disruption somewhere in the space in-between the sounding object and (...)
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  2. The Event of Rarefaction: A Defence and Development of The Wave Theory of Sound.Mark Eli Kalderon - manuscript
    I defend and develop a traditional view in the metaphysics of sound, The Wave Theory of Sound. According The Wave Theory, as developed herein, sounds are not patterned disturbances so much as their propagation. And the propagation of a patterned disturbance is not a form of travel, but a dynamic in-formation, the wave-form successively inhering in diferently located parts of the dense and elastic medium. This conception, along with the assumption that we hear not only sounds but their sources, has (...)
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  3. Do We Hear Compression Waves?Calvin K. W. Kwok - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy:1-29.
    The spatial misrepresentation objection (SMO) against the wave theory of sound argues that if sounds are compression waves, then our auditory experiences are massively illusory for not representing sounds as propagating in the medium. Thus, it claims that the wave theory should be rejected because it is unreasonable to accept such an error theory of hearing. This paper presents a metaphysics of compression waves to show that the wave theory correctly implies that we cannot hear sounds as propagating. Moreover, I (...)
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  4. Sonic Pictures.Jason P. Leddington - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    Winning essay of the American Society for Aesthetics' inaugural Peter Kivy Prize. Extends Kivy's notion of sonic picturing through engagement with recent work in philosophy of perception. Argues that sonic pictures are more widespread and more aesthetically and artistically important than even Kivy envisioned. Topics discussed include: the nature of sonic pictures; the nature of sounds; what we can (and more importantly, cannot) conclude from musical listening; sonic pictures in film; beatboxing as an art of sonic picturing; and cover songs (...)
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  5. If Sounds Were Dispositions, a Framework Proposal for an Undeveloped Theory.Jorge Luis Mendez-Martinez - forthcoming - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu.
    In the realm of the philosophy of sounds and auditory experience there is an ongoing discussion concerned with the nature of sounds. One of the contestant views within this ontology of sound is that of the Property View, which holds that sounds are properties of the sounding objects. A way of developing this view is through the idea of dispositionalism, namely, by sustaining the theory according to which sounds are dispositional properties (Pasnau 1999; Kulvicki 2008; Roberts 2017). That portrayal, however, (...)
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  6. Silence Perception and Spatial Content.Błażej Skrzypulec - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 1:1-15.
    It seems plausible that visual experiences of darkness have perceptual, phenomenal content which clearly differentiates them from absences of visual experiences. I argue, relying on psychological results concerning auditory attention, that the analogous claim is true about auditory experiences of silence. More specifically, I propose that experiences of silence present empty spatial directions like ‘right’ or ‘left’, and so have egocentric spatial content. Furthermore, I claim that such content is genuinely auditory and phenomenal in the sense that one can, in (...)
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  7. Acoustic Territories of the Body: Headphone Listening, Embodied Space, and the Phenomenology of Sonic Homeliness.Jacob Kingsbury Downs - 2021 - Journal of Sonic Studies 21.
    Can we describe certain sonic experiences as “homely,” even when they take place outside of a traditional home-space? While phenomenological accounts of home abound, with writers detailing a rich spectrum of the felt characteristics of the homely including safety, familiarity, and affective “warmth,” there is a scarcity of research into sonic experience that engages with such literatures. With specific interest in the experience of embodied space, I account here for what might be termed feelings of “sonic homeliness” as they emerge (...)
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  8. Headphones, Auditory Violence and the Sonic Flooding of Corporeal Space.Jacob Kingsbury Downs - 2021 - Body and Society 27 (3):58-86.
    In this article, I develop and redirect Julian Henriques’s model of sonic dominance through examination of accounts of acoustic violence and torture involving headphones. Specifically, I show how auditory experience has been weaponized as an intracorporeal phenomenon, with headphones effecting a sense of sounds invading the interior phenomenological space of the head. By analysing reported cases of sonic violence and torture involving headphones through a composite theoretical lens drawn from the fields of music, sound and body studies, I argue that (...)
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  9. Sound’s Matter: ‘Deleuzian Sound Studies’ and the Problems of Sonic Materialism.Iain Campbell - 2020 - Contemporary Music Review 39 (5):618-637.
    This article evaluates the theoretical and practical grounds of recent debates around Christoph Cox’s realist project of a ‘sonic materialism’ by returning to Gilles Deleuze, a key theoretical resource for Cox. It argues that a close engagement with Deleuze’s work in fact challenges many of the precepts of Cox’s sonic materialism, and suggests a rethinking of materialism in the context of music. Turning to some aspects of Deleuze’s work neglected by Cox, the ‘realist’ ontological inquiry Cox affirms is challenged through (...)
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  10. Una fenomenologia all’ascolto. Epochè, intenzionalità e costituzione del sonoro.Elia Gonnella - 2020 - Dialegesthai. Rivista Telematica di Filosofia 21.
    L'articolo analizza i fondamenti delle indagini percettive nell'impostazione fenomenologica. In particolare l'ambito uditivo si struttura in modalità, ricezioni ed analisi che, attraverso la critica di vari autori (Husserl, Heidegger, Dufrenne, Ihde, Schaeffer), si mostrano articolate in due direzioni (soggetto-oggetto e oggetto-soggetto). L' analisi delle componenti costitutive porta a riconoscere come ricorrente tra autori differenti quell'impostazione del problema la quale asserisce che, se da un lato non può prescindere dall'attività percettiva, come attività propria del soggetto, dall'altro questa stessa cerca una legittimità (...)
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  11. The Unmusical Ear: Georg Simon Ohm and the Mathematical Analysis of Sound.Melle Jan Kromhout - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):471-492.
  12. Hearing Waves: A Philosophy of Sound and Auditory Perception.Calvin K. W. Kwok - 2020 - Dissertation, The University of Hong Kong
    This dissertation aims to revive wave theory in the philosophy of sound. Wave theory identifies sounds with compression waves. Despite its wide acceptance in the scientific community as the default position, many philosophers have rejected wave theory and opted for different versions of distal theory instead. According to this current majority view, a sound has its stationary location at its source. I argue against this and other alternative philosophical theories of sound and develop wave theory into a more defensible form. (...)
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  13. Sound Ontology and the Brentano-Husserl Analysis of the Consciousness of Time.Jorge Luis Méndez-martínez - 2020 - HORIZON. Studies in Phenomenology 9 (1):184-215.
    Both Franz Brentano and Edmund Husserl addressed sound while trying to explain the inner consciousness of time and gave to it the status of a supporting example. Although their inquiries were not aimed at clarifying in detail the nature of the auditory experience or sounds themselves, they made some interesting observations that can contribute to the current philosophical discussion on sounds. On the other hand, in analytic philosophy, while inquiring the nature of sounds, their location, auditory experience or the audible (...)
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  14. Sounds Fully Simplified.Jason P. Leddington - 2019 - Analysis 79 (4):any075.
    In ‘The Ockhamization of the event sources of sound’ (2013), Roberto Casati, Elvira Di Bona, and Jérôme Dokic argue that ‘ockhamizing’ Casey O’Callaghan’s account of sounds as proper parts of their event sources yields their preferred view: that sounds are identical with their event sources. This article argues that the considerations Casati et al. marshal in favor of their view are actually stronger considerations in favor of a quite different view: a variant on the Lockean conception of sounds as ‘sensible (...)
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  15. Lorenzi, G., Lettura critica di "Il suono. L'esperienza uditiva e i suoi oggetti", di Elvira Di Bona e Vincenzo Santarcangelo, Raffaello Cortina Editore, Milano, 2018, pp. 138. [REVIEW]Giulia Lorenzi - 2019 - Aphex 20.
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  16. What Counts as "a" Sound and How "to Count" a Sound, the Problems of Individuating and Identifying Sounds.Jorge Luis Méndez-Martínez - 2019 - Synthesis Philosophica 1 (67):173-190.
    This paper addresses the problem of sound individuation (SI) and its connection to sound ontology (SO). It is argued that the problems of SI, such as aspatiality, extreme individuation, indexical perplexity and duration puzzles are due to SO’s uncertainties. Besides, I describe the views in SO, including the wave view (WV), the property view (PV), and the event view (EV), as Casey O’Callaghan defends it. According to O’Callaghan, EV offers clear standards to individuate sounds. However, this claim is countered by (...)
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  17. Resisting Hegemony Through Noise.Casey Robertson - 2019 - Assuming Gender 8 (7.1):50-73.
    This essay examines the cultural phenomena of noise in its perceived social constructions and demonstrates its emergence as a form of resistance against prevailing dominant hegemonic codes of culture. In particular, the paper explores the ability of noise to be enacted as a tool to escape the shackles of heteronormative constructions of sexuality and gender in the cultural landscape of the United States. Examined to support this argument are the contrasting works of two American artists: John Cage and Emilie Autumn. (...)
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  18. Ancient Sound Studies. Gurd Dissonance. Auditory Aesthetics in Ancient Greece. Pp. X + 239. New York: Fordham University Press, 2016. Cased, Us$55. Isbn: 978-0-8232-6965-5. [REVIEW]Shane Butler - 2018 - The Classical Review 68 (1):256-258.
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  19. In Defense of Medial Theories of Sound.Philip John Meadows - 2018 - American Philosophical Quarterly 55 (3):293-302.
    In the recent literature on the nature of sound, there is an emerging consensus rejection of what might be thought of as the scientifically informed commonsense position: that sounds, whatever else they may be, must be entities that mediate between the source of the sound and the subject hearing it. This paper offers an argument for such "medial" theories of sound. This argument is intended to shift attention from the two considerations that have dominated the debate thus far: the relevant (...)
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  20. John Cage, Gilles Deleuze, and the Idea of Sound.Iain Campbell - 2017 - Parallax 23 (3):361-378.
    In this essay we will take the American experimental composer John Cage’s understanding of sound as the starting point for an evaluation of that term in the field of sound studies. Drawing together two of the most influential figures in the field, Cage’s thought and work will serve as a lens through which to engage with recent debate concerning the uptake in sound studies of the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. In so doing we will attempt to develop a path between (...)
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  21. Does the ‘Missing Fundamental’ Require an Inferentialist Explanation?J. A. Judge - 2017 - Topoi 36 (2):319-329.
    In arbitrating between representational and relational theories of perception, perceptual illusions—cases in which a subject’s perceptual experience diverges from the way the world really is—constitute an important battleground. The debate has, however, been dominated by discussions of visual perception. In attempting to extend the debate to audition, it is appropriate to start by considering what is thought to be a key case of auditory illusion. I consider the phenomenon of the ‘missing fundamental’, as well as examining a notion that is (...)
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  22. Turning Up the Volume on the Property View of Sound.Pendaran Roberts - 2017 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 60 (4):337-357.
    In the present article, I show that sounds are properties that are not physical in a narrow sense. First, I argue that sounds are properties using Moorean style arguments and defend this property view from various arguments against it that make use of salient disanalogies between sounds and colors. The first disanalogy is that we talk of objects making sounds but not of objects making colors. The second is that we count and quantify over sounds but not colors. The third (...)
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  23. Irreducible Listening: Sound Unseen and Unspoken (Review of Sound Unseen: Acousmatic Sound in Theory and Practice, by Brian Kane, and The Order of Sounds: A Sonorous Archipelago, by François J. Bonnet). [REVIEW]Iain Campbell - 2016 - Sound Studies 2 (2):194-198.
  24. Effort and Displeasure in People Who Are Hard of Hearing.Mohan Matthen - 2016 - Ear and Hearing 37:28S-34S.
    Listening effort helps explain why people who are hard of hearing are prone to fatigue and social withdrawal. However, a one-factor model that cites only effort due to hardness of hearing is insufficient as there are many who lead happy lives despite their disability. This paper explores other contributory factors, in particular motivational arousal and pleasure. The theory of rational motivational arousal predicts that some people forego listening comprehension because they believe it to be impossible and hence worth no effort (...)
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  25. Review of James Stazicker (Ed.) The Structure of Perceptual Experience. [REVIEW]Christopher Mole - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:1.
    NDPR review of James Stazicker (ed.) The Structure of Perceptual Experience.
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  26. Sound Reasoning : Prospects and Challenges of Current Acoustic Logics.Marc Champagne - 2015 - Logica Universalis 9 (3):331-343.
    Building on the notational principles of C. S. Peirce’s graphical logic, Pietarinen has tried to develop a propositional logic unfolding in the medium of sound. Apart from its intrinsic interest, this project serves as a concrete test of logic’s range. However, I argue that Pietarinen’s inaugural proposal, while promising, has an important shortcoming, since it cannot portray double-negation without thereby portraying a contradiction.
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  27. Sonic Virtuality: Sound as Emergent Perception.Mark Grimshaw & Tom Garner - 2015 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In Sonic Virtuality: Sound as Emergent Perception, authors Mark Grimshaw and Tom Garner introduce a novel theory that positions sound within a framework of virtuality. Arguing against the acoustic or standard definition of sound as a sound wave, the book builds a case for a sonic aggregate as the virtual cloud of potentials created by perceived sound. The authors build on their recent work investigating the nature and perception of sound as used in computer games and virtual environments, and put (...)
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  28. Predictions and the Brain: How Musical Sounds Become Rewarding.Valorie N. Salimpoor, David H. Zald, Robert J. Zatorre, Alain Dagher & Anthony Randal McIntosh - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):86-91.
  29. Auditory Neuroscience: Making Sense of Sound.Adam M. Croom - 2014 - Musicae Scientiae: The Journal of the European Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music 18:1-3.
  30. Sonic Persuasion: Reading Sound in the Recorded Age by Greg Goodale (Review).Byron Hawk - 2014 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 47 (2):219-226.
    Sonic Persuasion is predominantly a history of sound in twentieth-century American culture that offers examples of how sound functions argumentatively in specific historical contexts. Goodale argues that sound can be read or interpreted in a manner similar to words and images but that the field of communication has largely neglected sound and its relationship to words and images. He shows how dialect, accents, and intonations in presidential speeches; ticking clocks, rumbling locomotives, and machinic hums in literary texts; and the sound (...)
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  31. Sound Unseen: Acousmatic Sound in Theory and Practice.Brian Kane - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Sound Unseen explores the phenomenon of acousmatic sound-a sound that one hears without seeing its source-and presents a powerful argument for the central yet overlooked role of acousmatic sound in music aesthetics, sound studies, literature, philosophy and the history of the senses.
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  32. What We Hear.Jason Leddington - 2014 - In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer Studies in Brain and Mind.
    A longstanding philosophical tradition holds that the primary objects of hearing are sounds rather than sound sources. In this case, we hear sound sources by—or in virtue of—hearing their sounds. This paper argues that, on the contrary, we have good reason to believe that the primary objects of hearing are sound sources, and that the relationship between a sound and its source is much like the relationship between a color and its bearer. Just as we see objects in seeing their (...)
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  33. Vowel Sounds in Words Affect Mental Construal and Shift Preferences for Targets.Sam J. Maglio, Cristina D. Rabaglia, Michael A. Feder, Madelaine Krehm & Yaacov Trope - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (3):1082-1096.
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  34. Sound.A. E. E. McKenzie - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    Originally published in 1936 as the final instalment of McKenzie's School Certificate series, this book explains the physical properties of sound. The text is accompanied by multiple photographs, drawings and diagrams to illustrate key points, and every chapter concludes with several questions for students to reinforce the chapter content. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of science education in Britain.
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  35. Auditory Perception.Casey O'Callaghan - 2014 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy 2009.
  36. Consciousness and Mental Qualities for Auditory Sensations.Adriana Renero - 2014 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (9-10):179-204.
    The contribution of recent theories of sound and audition has been extremely significant for the development of a philosophy of auditory perception; however, none tackle the question of how our consciousness of auditory states arises. My goal is to show how consciousness about our auditory experience gets triggered. I examine a range of auditory mental phenomena to show how we are able to capture qualitative distinctions of auditory sensations. I argue that our consciousness of auditory states consists in having thoughts (...)
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  37. Das hören des Cochlea Implantats.Robert Stock & Beate Ochsner - 2014 - Paragrana: Internationale Zeitschrift für Historische Anthropologie 22 (3):408-424.
    The contribution analyses (self-)descriptions of hearing experiences articulated by cochlear implant (CI) users through internet blogs. These auto-medial testimonies (Dünne/Moser) are understood as elements of an individuation process that reciprocally produces the CI-user as well as the CI itself. The analysis therefore focuses on those acoustic effects that are established by the CI, its first activation and the further mapping or adaptation processes as well as early CI-hearing experiences and subsequent listening exercises. It can thus be shown how the cultural (...)
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  38. The Ockhamization of the Event Sources of Sound.R. Casati, E. Di Bona & J. Dokic - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):462-466.
    There is one character too many in the triad sound, event source, thing source. As there are neither phenomenological nor metaphysical grounds for distinguishing sounds and sound sources, we propose to identify them.
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  39. The Sonic Effect: Aurality and Digital Networks in Exurbia.David Cecchetto - 2013 - Evental Aesthetics 2 (2):34-62.
    This essay examines the problem of medial specificity in music and sound art, giving particular attention to Seth Kim-Cohen’s call for a non-cochlear sound art based on the notion of “expansion” that has been decisive in visual arts discourses. I argue that Kim-Cohen’s non-cochlear intervention in In the Blink of an Ear might be productively pressured towards the concept of a “sonic effect” that acknowledges the material-discursive particularity of sound without recourse to the phenomenological claims of authenticity that Kim-Cohen correctly (...)
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  40. Against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes.Gregory Fowler - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):466-473.
    I argue against the Primary Sound Account of Echoes (PSAE) – the view that an echo of a sound just is that sound. I then argue that if my case against PSAE is successful, distal theories of sound are false. The upshot of my arguments, if they succeed, is that distal theories are false. Towards the end, I show how some distal theories can be modified to avoid this conclusion and note some open questions to which the modified theories give (...)
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  41. 15 Hearing and Hallucinating Silence.Ian Phillips - 2013 - In Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.), Hallucination. MIT Press. pp. 333.
    Tradition has it that, although we experience darkness, we can neither hear nor hallucinate silence. At most, we hear that it is silent, in virtue of lacking auditory experience. This cognitive view is at odds with our ordinary thought and talk. Yet it is not easy to vouchsafe the perception of silence: Sorensen‘s recent account entails the implausible claim that the permanently and profoundly deaf are perpetually hallucinating silence. To better defend the view that we can genuinely hear and hallucinate (...)
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  42. Reflections on Art.Andrei Şerban - 2013 - Human and Social Studies 2 (1):11-21.
    The following study presents some considerations on different subjects regarding the field of art, from the art of using sounds in theatre and the importance of the Greek tragedy to the subtle differences between opera and theatre. The sound experiment is to be approached knowing that the audience is, in some way, deaf. The renewal of the sounds, even of those coming forth from the remote ages, is part of the author’s lust for a theater that celebrates real contact and (...)
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  43. The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies. [REVIEW]Volker Smyrek - 2013 - Isis 104:421-422.
  44. Sound Arguments.Brad Thomson - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 63:121-122.
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  45. When Sounds Look Right and Images Sound Correct: Cross-Modal Coherence Enhances Claims of Pattern Presence.Michał Ziembowicz, Andrzej Nowak & Piotr Winkielman - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):273-278.
  46. Sound Bites or Sound Law and Science? Distinguishing "Fertilization" and "Conception" in the Context of Preimplantation IVF Embryos, ESCR, and Personhood.Susan L. Crockin & Celine Anselmina Lefebvre - 2012 - Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 3 (4):247-261.
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  47. Its Role in Society with Sound Infusion.Alexis Dubeurdieu - 2012 - Ethos: Social Education Victoria 20 (2).
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  48. Kerima Polotan-Tuvera: An Analysis of Her Style and Craft as Reviewed From Her Short Stories The Virgin and the Sounds of Sunday.Emeliza Torrento Estimo - 2012 - Iamure International Journal of Literature, Philosophy and Religion 1 (1).
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  49. Book Review: Sounds: A Philosophical Theory; Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays.A. Gritten - 2012 - British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):430-434.
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  50. Notes on Sound.Bonnie Jones - 2012 - Continent 2 (2):64-65.
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 64–65 Notes on Notes on Sound, July 18, 8:34pm Isaac Linder Paul de Man begins his landmark text, Allegories of Reading , with a cheeky epigraph from the philosopher Blaise Pascal. It reads, 'Quand on lit trop vite ou trop doucement on n’entend rien' (When you read too quickly or too slowly you hear nothing). The epigraph is cheeky because in the course of de Man's work he avoids elucidating at what speed one would one would be (...)
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