Sociology of Knowledge

Edited by Markus Seidel (University of Münster)
Assistant editor: Charlott Becker (University of Münster)
About this topic
Summary Sociology of Knowledge aims at an understanding of the social aspects of knowledge. It comprises research about all kinds of knowledge like e.g. scientific knowledge, common knowledge and practical knowledge.
Key works Mannheim & Wirth 1946 can rightly be called one of the classics of sociology of knowledge, Berger & Luckmann 1966 argues for a new approach in the sociology of knowledge that takes into account 'what everybody knows'.  Schutz 1973 is the vantage point for a phenomenological tradition in the sociology of knowledge.  Foucault ms introduces the influential Archeology of Knowledge.
Introductions Hamilton 1974 is a general introduction to the field, Meja & Stehr 1999 provides a collection of key essays from the beginning of sociology of knowledge
Related categories

425 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 425
  1. Thinking Twice About Virtue and Vice.Guy Axtell - manuscript
    [FREE PUBLISHED VERSION AT LINK BELOW]. This chapter provides an empirical defense of credit theories of knowing against Alfano’s the-ses of inferential cognitive situationism and of epistemic situationism. It also develops a Nar-row-Broad Spectrum of agency-ascriptions in reply to Olin and Doris’ ‘trade-off problem.’ In order to support the claim that credit theories can treat many cases of success through heuristic cognitive strategies as credit-conferring, the paper develops the compatibility between VE and dual-process theories (DPT) in cognitive psychology. A genuine (...)
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  2. ON THE EXISTENCE OF BRUNO LATOUR'S MODES.Terence Blake - manuscript
    In this article I take a critical look at the origins and sources of Bruno Latour's pluralism as it is expressed in his book AN INQUIRY INTO MODES OF EXISTENCE, and compare it to other similar projects (Wittgenstein, Feyerabend, Badiou). I consider the accusations of reductionism and of relativism, and demonstrate that Latour's «empirical metaphysics» is not an ontological reductionism but a pluralist ontology recognising the existence of a plurality of entities and of types of entities. Nor is it an (...)
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  3. Inequality and the Saying, “It’s Who You Know, Not What You Know,” by J*Seph R*Z.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper considers whether the saying, “It’s who you know, not what you know” can be used instead of jargon-laden studies of inequality. I argue that it is not a good replacement in some cases and present a challenge to standard Bourdieusian explanations of inequality in some fields. The paper is written as a pastiche of the distinguished political philosopher Joseph Raz.
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  4. Inequality, Internet Likes, and the Rules of Philosophy, by Ren*T* S*Lecl.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    How can we explain why certain historically discriminated groups are under-represented in English-speaking analytic philosophy? I present a hypothesis which appeals to rules, rather than relying upon the social theories of Pierre Bourdieu. I do by means of an attempted pastiche of Renata Salecl, my third attempt.
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  5. On Bringing Back Distinguished Social Scientists From the Past.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper disputes an assumption to do with the project of evaluating how much increase in knowledge there has been in a social science field. There is a brief pastiche of Laura Riding’s Progress of Stories in place of the customary poem.
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  6. Is That All There is to Know?: The Limits of 'Eurocentric' Epistemology.Miguel Hernandez - manuscript
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  7. WikiSilo: A Self-Organizing, Crowd Sourcing System for Interdisciplinary Science [Supporting Paper].David Pierre Leibovitz, Robert L. West & Mike Belanger - manuscript
    WikiSilo is a tool for theorizing across interdisciplinary fields such as Cognitive Science, and provides a vocabulary for talking about the problems of doing so. It can be used to demonstrate that a particular cognitive theory is complete and coherent at multiple levels of discourse, and commensurable with and relevant to a wider domain of cognition. WikiSilo is also a minimalist theory and methodology for effectively doing science. WikiSilo is simultaneously similar to and distinct, as well as integrated and separated (...)
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  8. Epistemic Insouciance is Not a Moral Vice.Jacob Nofal - manuscript
    In this paper, I'm going to ask and answer the following question: Is epistemic insouciance a moral vice? This is an important question because whether epistemic insouciance is a moral vice or not will tell us whether epistemic insouciance should be condemned and avoided. Cassam points out that epistemic insouciance is an epistemic vice, but not all epistemic vices ought to be avoided/condemned. I plan to argue that epistemic insouciance is not a moral vice and therefore the insouciant person should (...)
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  9. Epistemology of Intelligence Agencies.Nicolae Sfetcu - manuscript
    About the analogy between the epistemological and methodological aspects of the activity of intelligence agencies and some scientific disciplines, advocating for a more scientific approach to the process of collecting and analyzing information within the intelligence cycle. I assert that the theoretical, ontological and epistemological aspects of the activity of many intelligence agencies are underestimated, leading to incomplete understanding of current phenomena and confusion in inter-institutional collaboration. After a brief Introduction, which includes a history of the evolution of the intelligence (...)
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  10. Third-Order Epistemic Exclusion in Professional Philosophy.Zahra Thani & & Derek Anderson - forthcoming - Symposion. Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences.
    Zahra Thani & Derek Anderson ABSTRACT: Third-order exclusion is a form of epistemic oppression in which the epistemic lifeway of a dominant group disrupts the epistemic agency of members of marginalized groups. In this paper we apply situated perspectives in order to argue that philosophy as a discipline imposes third-order exclusions on members of marginalized ….
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  11. Vilfredo Pareto and the Sociology of Knowledge.Brigitte Berger - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  12. What Theoretical Ecology Reveals About Knowledge Transfer.Justin Donhauser & Jamie Shaw - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A:1-20.
    Well-known epistemologies of science have implications for how best to understand knowledge transfer (KT). Yet, to date, no serious attempt has been made to explicate these particular implications. This paper infers views about KT from two popular epistemologies; what we characterize as incommensurabilitist views (after Devitt, 2001; Bird, 2002, 2008; Sankey and Hoyningen-Huene 2013) and voluntarist views (after Van Fraassen, 1984; Dupré, 2001; Chakravartty, 2015). We argue views of the former sort define the methodological, ontological, and social conditions under which (...)
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  13. The ‘Ontological Complicity’ of Habitus and Field: Was Bourdieu an ‘Externalist’?Nikolaus Fogle & Georg Theiner - forthcoming - In Duncan Pritchard, Orestis Palermos & Adam Carter (eds.), Socially Extended Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Our aim in this chapter is to contribute to a greater appreciation of Bourdieu’s work within debates on embodied, extended and distributed cognition, grouped under the general heading of externalism (Rowlands 2003, Carter et al. 2014). We seek to draw out several pertinent elements of Bourdieu’s theory of social practice, and show how they variously resonate with, enrich, or problematize key externalist theses. We begin with an overview of the main elements of Bourdieu’s theoretical enterprise, in order to provide essential (...)
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  14. We Forge the Conditions of Love.Georgi Gardiner - forthcoming - In Carlos Montemayor & Abrol Fairweather (eds.), Linguistic Luck: Essays in Anti-Luck Semantics.
    This essay is not about what love is. It is about what self-ascriptions of love do. People typically self-ascribe romantic love when a nexus of feelings, beliefs, attitudes, values, commitments, experiences, and personal histories matches their conception of romantic love. But what shapes this conception? And (how) can we adjudicate amongst conflicting conceptions? -/- Self-ascriptions of love do not merely describe the underlying nexus of attitudes and beliefs. They also change it. This essay describes how conceptions of love affect romantic (...)
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  15. Group Lies and the Narrative Constraint.Säde Hormio - forthcoming - Episteme 19 (First View):1-20.
    A group is lying when it makes a statement that it believes to be untrue but wants the addressee(s) to believe. But how can we distinguish statements that the group believes to be untrue from honest group statements based on mistaken beliefs or confusion within the group? I will suggest a narrative constraint for honest group statements, made up of two components. Narrative coherence requires that a new group statement should not conflict with group knowledge on the matter, or beliefs (...)
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  16. Epistemic Contextualism and the Sociality of Knowledge.Jonathan Ichikawa - forthcoming - In Jennifer Lackey & Aidan McGlynn (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter has four central aims. First, in §1, I distinguish two ideas within epistemology that sometimes travel under the name ‘contextualism’ — the ‘situational contextualist’ idea that an individual’s context, especially their social context, can make for a difference in what they know, and the ‘linguistic contextualist’ idea that discourse using the word ‘knows’ and its cognates is context-sensitive, expressing dif- ferent contents in different conversational contexts. -/- Second, in §2, I situate contextualism with respect to several influential ideas (...)
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  17. Individual and Structural Interventions.Alex Madva - forthcoming - In Erin Beeghly & Alex Madva (eds.), An Introduction to Implicit Bias: Knowledge, Justice, and the Social Mind.
    What can we do—and what should we do—to fight against bias? This final chapter introduces empirically-tested interventions for combating implicit (and explicit) bias and promoting a fairer world, from small daily-life debiasing tricks to larger structural interventions. Along the way, this chapter raises a range of moral, political, and strategic questions about these interventions. This chapter further stresses the importance of admitting that we don’t have all the answers. We should be humble about how much we still don’t know and (...)
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  18. Problems with Publishing Philosophical Claims We Don’T Believe.Işık Sarıhan - forthcoming - Episteme:1-10.
    Plakias has recently argued that there is nothing wrong with publishing defences of philosophical claims which we don’t believe and also nothing wrong with concealing our lack of belief, because an author’s lack of belief is irrelevant to the merit of a published work. Fleisher has refined this account by limiting the permissibility of publishing without belief to what he calls ‘advocacy role cases’. I argue that such lack of belief is irrelevant only if it is the result of an (...)
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  19. Baudrillard and Consumer Society.Irfan Ajvazi - 2022 - Tesla Academy 1:10.
    Baudrillard was deeply influenced by this new ‘science’ of Semiology, which sought to study the system of language and the ‘life of signs within society’. In semiotics, a sign can be interpreted subjectively, the meaning being something beyond or other than itself. This sign is therefore able to communicate information to the person reading or decoding the sign. Baudrillard builds on the Saussurian dyadic, two-part model of the sign, where the sign is seen as being composed of a signifier (signifiant)- (...)
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  20. Reading Bruno Latour's Reassembling the Social: An Introduction to Actor-Network-Theory.Irfan Ajvazi - 2022 - Tesla Academy of Sciences 1:10.
    Latour does not seek any “hidden” reasons behind actions; there is not a dictionary or encyclopedia explaining the sources of the behaviors of the actors. No meta-language is in question. The analyst cannot address any invisible agency. If an agency is invisible, then it has no effect, therefore it is not an agency. If an analyst says: “No one mentions it. For Latour, agency is not limited to human beings, but objects should also be counted as agents which is one (...)
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  21. John Augustus Abayomi Cole and the Search for an African Science, 1885–1898.Colin Bos - 2022 - Isis 113 (1):63-84.
  22. Can Standpoint Epistemology Avoid Inconsistency, Circularity, and Unnecessariness? A Comment on Ashton’s Remarks About Epistemic Privilege.Claudio Cormick - 2022 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (11):29-41.
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  23. Entrevista a Lizett Karen Graham Milla. Estratega en Comunicación Corporativa y Relaciones Públicas.Jesús Miguel Delgado Del Aguila - 2022 - Social Innova Sciences 3 (1):75-78.
    La comunicación es una herramienta fundamental para que la humanidad pueda vivir de forma armoniosa. Este rubro es imprescindible y requiere un mayor cuidado cuando se desarrolla en el sector laboral o corporativo, puesto que se necesitará otro tipo de estrategias para que el resultado sea óptimo para los trabajadores y la empresa, con la finalidad de que aumente la productividad y el beneficio para ellos. En ese sentido, la entrevista que se realiza a la estratega Lizett Karen Graham Milla (...)
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  24. Rethinking the Rites Controversy: Kilian Stumpf's Acta Pekinensia and the Historical Dimensions of a Religious Quarrel.Gianamar Giovannetti-Singh - 2022 - Modern Intellectual History 19 (1):29-53.
    The Chinese rites controversy is typically characterized as a religious quarrel between different Catholic orders over whether it was permissible for Chinese converts to observe traditional rites and use the terms tian and shangdi to refer to the Christian God. As such, it is often argued that the conflict was shaped predominantly by the divergent theological attitudes between the rites-supporting Jesuits and their anti-rites opponents towards “accommodation.” By examining the Jesuit missionary Kilian Stumpf's Acta Pekinensia—a detailed chronicle of the papal (...)
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  25. What’s Epistemic About Epistemic Paternalism?Elizabeth Jackson - 2022 - In Jonathan Matheson & Kirk Lougheed (eds.), Epistemic Autonomy. New York: Routledge. pp. 132–150.
    The aim of this paper is to (i) examine the concept of epistemic paternalism and (ii) explore the consequences of normative questions one might ask about it. I begin by critically examining several definitions of epistemic paternalism that have been proposed, and suggesting ways they might be improved. I then contrast epistemic and general paternalism and argue that it’s difficult to see what makes epistemic paternalism an epistemic phenomenon at all. Next, I turn to the various normative questions one might (...)
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  26. Ingold’s Animism and European Science.Jeff Kochan - 2022 - Perspectives on Science 30 (4):783-817.
    Anthropologist Tim Ingold promotes Indigenous animism as a salve for perceived failures in modern science, failures he claims also hobbled his own early work. In fact, both Ingold’s early and later work rely on modern scientific ideas and images. His turn to animism marks not an exit from the history of European science, but an entrance into, and imaginative elaboration of, distinctly Neoplatonic themes within that history. This turn marks, too, a clear but unacknowledged departure from systematic social analysis. By (...)
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  27. The Impact of Paid Employment on Women's Empowerment: A Case Study of Female Garment Workers in Bangladesh.Md Abdullah Al Mamun & Md Mahmudul Hoque - 2022 - World Development Sustainability 1 (1):1-11.
    The role of the Ready-made Garment (RMG) sector in transforming the lives of working women in Bangladesh has been controversial. This study examines the impact of paid employment in the RMG sector on the empowerment of its female workers. The fieldwork includes semi-structured interviews with female garment workers to explore their lived experiences and views. The primary qualitative data analysis draws principally on Kabeer's (1999) three inter-related dimensions (resources, agency, and achievements) of empowerment. The main findings of the research are (...)
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  28. DO PROCESSO FORMATIVO-EDUCACIONAL ENQUANTO AFIRMAÇÃO DAS FORÇAS DA VIDA SEGUNDO NIETZSCHE E A CORRELAÇÃO ENVOLVENDO ARTE E FILOSOFIA NO FILME “SOCIEDADE DOS POETAS MORTOS”.Luiz Carlos Mariano da Rosa - 2022 - Revista de Educação Pública 31 (1):1-24.
    Baseado no filme “Sociedade dos Poetas Mortos”, o artigo assinala o impacto na escola Welton dos novos métodos de ensino e aprendizagem do professor John Keating, que sublinha o sentido e o valor da vida, defendendo o cultivo de si e o conhecimento enquanto afirmação das forças da vida. Dessa forma, fundado na crítica de Nietzsche à “cultura histórica” e à questão envolvendo os professores de filosofia - filósofos ou servidores da “história”? -, o artigo propõe a superação da redução (...)
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  29. Cultivating Trust, Producing Knowledge: The Management of Archaeological Labour and the Making of a Discipline.Allison Mickel & Nylah Byrd - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (2):3-28.
    Like any science, archaeology relies on trust between actors involved in the production of knowledge. In the early history of archaeology, this epistemic trust was complicated by histories of Orientalism in the Middle East and colonialism more broadly. The racial and power dynamics underpinning 19th- and early 20th-century archaeology precluded the possibility of interpersonal moral trust between foreign archaeologists and locally hired labourers. In light of this, archaeologists created systems of reward, punishment, and surveillance to ensure the honest behaviour of (...)
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  30. Reading the Cold War Through Outer Space: The Past and Future of Outer Space.Yang Immanuel Pachankis - 2022 - International Journal of Scientific and Engineering Research 13 (6):826-829.
    The article takes a history based technical analysis on the governing activities by outer space laws. It outlined the spirit of the outer space law and treaty by the scientific development of the earth’s orbits & solar objects’ orbits. It focuses on the contamination of outer space by human activities in large scale structure with concluding scientific evidence. It analyzed geopolitical conflicts in terms of satellite technologies. They are analyzed based on the utility-science dichotomy, and the subject(s) that ultimately benefit (...)
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  31. The Lenses of Quantum Physics on Earth to the Cosmos: From the Humanities to the Apocalyptic Inevitability.Yang Immanuel Pachankis - 2022 - Moldova, Europe: Eliva Press.
    Purpose: the book is a collection and reorganization of my previously published works. Albeit the focus of the literature is on human rights, significant portions of the evidence are based on quantum physics and quantum mechanics. The technical facets of analysis are from psychoanalysis applied in the dictatorial regime development, analysis on physical signals & satellite designs, orbital analysis, data science, cyber intrusion & security, and physiochemical reasoning in public health. My background in economics and management have partially contributed to (...)
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  32. A Tension in the Strong Program: The Relation Between the Rational and the Social.Shahram Shahryari - 2022 - Social Epistemology 36 (2):194-204.
    Advocating a sociological explanation of scientific knowledge, David Bloor protests against the adherents of the autonomy of knowledge; i.e., those who asymmetrically explain the credibility of theories in the history of science. These philosophers and historians regard the credibility of true and rational theories due to their proper reasons, while accounting for the acceptance of false or irrational beliefs by citing social causes. Bloor assumes that the credibility of all beliefs is socially influenced, and therefore considers all in need of (...)
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  33. Norms of Inquiry, Student-Led Learning, and Epistemic Paternalism.Robert Mark Simpson - 2022 - In Jonathan Matheson & Kirk Lougheed (eds.), Epistemic Autonomy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 95-112.
    Should we implement epistemically paternalistic measures outside of the narrow range of cases, like legal trials, in which their benefits and justifiability seem clear-cut? In this chapter I draw on theories of student-led pedagogy, and Jane Friedman’s work on norms of inquiry, to argue against this prospect. The key contention in the chapter is that facts about an inquirer’s interests and temperament have a bearing on whether it is better for her to, at any given moment, pursue epistemic goods via (...)
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  34. How to Fight Linguistic Injustice in Science: Equity Measures and Mitigating Agents.Aleksandra Vučković & Vlasta Sikimić - 2022 - Social Epistemology:1-17.
    Though a common language of science allows for easier communication of the results among researchers, the use of lingua franca also comes with the cost of losing some of the diverse ideas and results arising from the plurality of languages. Following Quine’s famous thesis about the indeterminacy of translation, we elaborate on the inherent loss of diverse ideas when only one language of science is used. Non-native speakers sometimes experience epistemic injustice due to their language proficiency and consequently, their scientific (...)
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  35. Mindsponge Theory.Quan-Hoang Vuong - 2022 - Hanoi, Vietnam: AISDL.
    As humans, we use the power of thinking to make scientific discoveries, develop technologies, manage social interactions, and transmit knowledge to the next generations. With the ability to think, we can trace back and discover the origin of the universe, the natural world, and ourselves. The content of this book, Mindsponge Theory, is part of that discovery process.
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  36. An Anthropological Toolkit: Sixty Useful Concepts.David Zeitlyn - 2022 - Oxford: Berghahan.
    Presenting sixty theoretical ideas, David Zeitlyn asks ‘How to write about anthropological theory without making a specific theoretical argument.’ To answer, he offers a series of mini essays about an eclectic collection of theoretical concepts that he has found helpful over the years. The book celebrates the muddled inconsistencies in the ways that humans live their messy lives. There are, however, still patterns discernible: the actors can understand what is going on, they see an event unfolding in ways that are (...)
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  37. DARWIN ≥ MARX - ECO/LOGICAL R/EVOLUTION.Pater Ciprian - 2021 - Ålesund: Marxist Avant-Guard Teacher.
    Eco/logical R/evolution, is the story of mankind, told with words of a great and wonderful subjective odyssey, the never-ending quest; for objective truths and collective Eudaimonia. The author raises the issues; of political weakness and widespread confusion, about logical analytical errors, of which we find many of in Old Marxist Ideology. As a conscious effort, is thus made, to expel the mental subjugation of Platonic Idealism, away from the clenches Aristotelian Realism, and its bastard offspring; Old Historical Materialism. The book (...)
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  38. A Science of Concord: The Politics of Commercial Knowledge in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain.Jon Cooper - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (2).
    This article recovers mid-century proposals for sciences of concord and contextualizes them as part of a broader politics of commercial knowledge in eighteenth-century Britain. It begins by showing how merchants gained authority as formulators of commercial policy during the Commerce Treaty debates of 1713–1714. This authority held fast during the Walpolean oligarchy, but collapsed by the 1740s, when lobbying and patronage were increasingly maligned as corrupt by a ferment of popular republicanism. The article then explores how the Anglican cleric Josiah (...)
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  39. Da autoformação no processo educacional entre a conformação e a autotransformação: Do jogo sociocultural e a inter-relação envolvendo modus vivendi e modus essendi.Luiz Carlos Mariano Da Rosa - 2021 - São Paulo, SP, Brasil: PZP - Politikón Zôon Publicações.
    Recuperando a noção de Paidéia, legado grego, a pesquisa em questão, detendo-se nos indícios do ideal da autoformação, para cujas fronteiras converge o contexto sociocultural da atualidade, discorre sobre o processo pedagógico que, imbricado em uma rede de relações que envolve as formas simbólicas mediante as quais o homem constrói o mundo, estruturalizando a realidade, se movimenta, no decorrer da história, oscilando entre a tendência que ora prioriza a formação individual, ora absolutiza o aspecto social, objetos de investigação no Capítulo (...)
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  40. Debunking Conspiracy Theories.M. R. X. Dentith - 2021 - Synthese 198 (10):9897-9911.
    In this paper I interrogate the notion of `debunking conspiracy theories’, arguing that the term `debunk’ carries with it pejorative implications, given that the verb `to debunk’ is commonly understood as `to show the wrongness of a thing or concept’. As such, the notion of `debunking conspiracy theories’ builds in the notion that such theories are not just wrong but ought to be shown as being wrong. I argue that we should avoid the term `debunk’ and focus on investigating conspiracy (...)
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  41. The Possibility of Epistemic Nudging: Reply to My Critics.Thomas Grundmann - 2021 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 10 (12):28-35.
    In “The Possibility of Epistemic Nudging” (2021), I address a phenomenon that is widely neglected in the current literature on nudges: intentional doxastic nudging, i.e. people’s intentional influence over other people’s beliefs, rather than over their choices. I argue that, at least in brute cases, nudging is not giving reasons, but rather bypasses reasoning altogether. More specifically, nudging utilizes psychological heuristics and the nudged person’s biases in smart ways. The goal of my paper is to defend the claim that nudging, (...)
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  42. ¿Podemos vivir con el gigante? La máquina epistemológica universitaria: reflexiones y propuestas sobre la tecnología académica.Carlos Hernandez - 2021 - Revista de Filosofía 53 (Núm. 150 (2021)):234-277.
    Abstract Nowadays, there is a deep and widespread feeling of discomfort among academics due to the psychological and labor pressures that universities exert upon their researchers by demanding endless publications. In this paper, I offer numerous pieces of evidence of this crisis, which affects primarily those who inhabit academic ecologies. First, I argue that it is convenient to understand the current situation as an expression of technologies and individual apparatuses shaped by subjectivizing ideologies, and mechanisms of exclusion, stigmatization, and replacement. (...)
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  43. Political Economies of "The Commons": Epigraphs to Nothing.Gavin Keeney, David S. Jones & Owen O'Carroll - 2021 - In Francisco Javier Carrillo & Cathy Garner (eds.), City Preparedness for Climate Crisis: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar. pp. 319-30.
    “Noverim me, noverim te.” – Saint Augustine, Confessions, 10.1.1. (397-400 AD). -/- What would and will an urban commons look like that is slowly and incrementally being re-socialized? How would that affect urban planning “now” and in times of crisis? How do we prepare for the likelihood of rolling similar crises with an eye on returning the urban commons to citizens? -/- There is the old adage that under capitalism, risk is always socialized and profit is always privatized. We are (...)
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  44. Demonstrating the Therapeutic Values of Poetry in Doctoral Research: Autoethnographic Steps From the Enchanted Forest to a PhD by Publication Path.Suleman Lazarus - 2021 - Methodological Innovations 14 (2):1-11.
    We rarely acknowledge the achievements of doctoral candidates who fought with all they had but still lost the battle and dropped out – we know so little about what becomes of them. This reflective article is about the betrayals of PhD supervisors in one institution, the trauma and stigma of withdrawing from that institution, writing poetry as a coping mechanism and the triumph in completing a Thesis by Publication (TBP) in another institution. Thus, I build on Lesley Saunders’s idea about (...)
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  45. The Politics of Knowledge in Inclusive Development and Innovation.David Ludwig, Birgit Boogaard, Phil Macnaghten & Cees Leeuwis (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    This book develops an integrated perspective on the practices and politics of making knowledge work in inclusive development and innovation. While debates about development and innovation commonly appeal to the authority of academic researchers, many current approaches emphasize the plurality of actors with relevant expertise for addressing livelihood challenges. Adopting an action-oriented and reflexive approach, this volume explores the variety of ways in which knowledge works, paying particular attention to dilemmas and controversies. The six parts of the book address the (...)
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  46. Evidentialism and Belief Polarization.Emily C. McWilliams - 2021 - Synthese 198 (8):7165-7196.
    Belief polarization occurs when subjects who disagree about some matter of fact are exposed to a mixed body of evidence that bears on that dispute. While we might expect mutual exposure to common evidence to mitigate disagreement, since the evidence available to subjects comes to consist increasingly of items they have in common, this is not what happens. The subjects’ initial disagreement becomes more pronounced because each person increases confidence in her antecedent belief. Kelly aims to identify the mechanisms that (...)
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  47. Technology as Enabler of the Automation of Work? Current Societal Challenges for a Future Perspective of Work.António Moniz, Bettina-Johanna Krings & Philipp Frey - 2021 - Revista Brasileira de Sociologia 9:206-229.
    Due to the innovative possibilities of digital technologies, the issue of increasing automation is once again on the agenda – and not only in the industry, but also in other branches and sectors of contemporary societies. Although public and scientific discussions about automation seem to raise relevant questions of the “old” debate, such as the replacement of human labor by introducing new technologies, the authors focus here on the new contextual quality of these questions. The debate should rethink the relationship (...)
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  48. Pathways of Influence: Understanding the Impact of Philosophy of Science in Scientific Domains.Kathryn S. Plaisance, Jay Michaud & John McLevey - 2021 - Synthese (TBD):1-32.
    Philosophy of science has the potential to enhance scientific practice, science policy, and science education; moreover, recent research indicates that many philosophers of science think we ought to increase the broader impacts of our work. Yet, there is little to no empirical data on how we are supposed to have an impact. To address this problem, our research team interviewed 35 philosophers of science regarding the impact of their work in science-related domains. We found that face-to-face engagement with scientists and (...)
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  49. Cultural-Historical Epistemology and Perspectives of the Philosophy of Science.Boris I. Pruzhinin & Tatiana G. Shchedrina - 2021 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 58 (2):19-26.
    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate the methodological effectiveness of one of the directions in developing the philosophy of science – cultural and historical epistemology. Cultural-historical epistemology does not pretend at all to be any radical epistemological originality but offers a general view of science as a part of intellectual culture, where both individual historical cases and broad sociological generalizations find their methodologically significant place. The authors believe that it is the development of methodological norms capable of determining (...)
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  50. The Sociologist of Knowledge in the Positivism Dispute.Iaan Reynolds - 2021 - Distinktion: Journal of Social Theory 2021.
    This paper studies the conflict between critical rationalism and critical theory in Karl Popper and Theodor Adorno’s 1961 debate by analyzing their shared rejection of Karl Mannheim’s sociology of knowledge. Despite the divergences in their respective projects of critical social research, Popper and Adorno agree that Mannheim’s sociology of knowledge is uncritical. By investigating their respective assessments of this research program I reveal a deeper similarity between critical rationalism and critical theory. Though both agree on the importance of critique, they (...)
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