Skepticism

Edited by Everett Fulmer (Loyola University, New Orleans)
About this topic
Summary Skepticism involves doubt, or at least a reluctance to commit. For example, some philosophers are moral skeptics, claiming that no one can know what is right or wrong. Skepticism about the "external world" is more general, denying that there is knowledge of the world “outside our minds.”  Even more generally, some skeptics claim that there is no knowledge at all.  Philosophers have long explored reasons for and against various skeptical positions and argued about the consequences of adopting various skeptical stances.   In the ancient world, skepticism was recommended as a way of life.  The general claim was that living with an attitude of skeptical doubt is superior (morally and/or practically) to living with an attitude of dogmatic certainty.  In the modern world (i.e., the 1600s through the 1800s), skepticism was more often treated as something to be avoided, and considerable philosophical energy was put into strategies for doing so.  In contemporary philosophy, skepticism is typically framed as a theoretical problem rather than a practical one. The concern is to closely consider the best arguments for skepticism and to explore how best to respond to them.  Attempts to answer skeptical arguments have inspired philosophers to adopt substantive positions in epistemology, but also in ontology, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, and moral philosophy.  
Key works The Oxford Handbook of Skepticism provides a comprehensive introduction to skeptical arguments and responses to skepticism.  Influential volumes include Popkin 1960Unger 1975Stroud 1984; and Williams 1991.   
Introductions Useful introductory articles include DeRose 1995; Greco 2007Pritchard 2002.
Related

Contents
5045 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 5045
Material to categorize
  1. Free Will Skepticism, Quarantine, and Corrections.John Lemos - 2024 - Diametros 21 (79):107-118.
    This article compares the quarantine model of criminal justice advocated by Derk Pereboom and Gregg Caruso with the corrections model of criminal justice advocated by Michael Corrado. Both of these theories are grounded on the presumption that persons lack desert-grounding free will. It is argued that on this presumption there is no reason to believe that Michael Corrado’s corrections model is any better than the quarantine model.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Narcissism Dynamics and Auditor Skepticism.Steven E. Kaszak, Eric N. Johnson, Philip M. J. Reckers & Alan Reinstein - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    The process by which auditors consider fraud risk in assessing management’s motivation and character remains under-addressed. This is problematic given the rising tide of narcissism, as well as recent research documenting that both self- and other-perceptions of narcissism influence an array of judgments. While a skeptical attitude is fundamental to the auditor’s gatekeeper role, it remains unclear how auditors form and act on perceptions of client narcissism. With a large sample of experienced accountants as participants, we leverage insights from current (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Factualist Interpretation of the Skeptical Solution and Semantic Primitivism.Michał Wieczorkowski - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-14.
    According to the factualist interpretation, the skeptical solution to the skeptic’s problem hinges on rejecting inflationary accounts of semantic facts, advocating instead for the adoption of minimal factualism. However, according to Alexander Miller, this account is unsound. Miller argues that minimal factualism represents a form of semantic primitivism, a position expressly rejected by Kripke’s Wittgenstein. Furthermore, Miller states that minimal factualism presupposes the conformity of meaning ascriptions with rules of discipline and syntax. However, he contends that this maneuver is also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Skeptical Theistic Steadfastness.Jamie B. Turner - forthcoming - Faith and Philosophy.
    The problem of religious disagreement between epistemic peers is a potential threat to the epistemic justification of one’s theistic belief. In this paper, I develop a response to this problem which draws on the central epistemological thesis of skeptical theism concerning our inability to make proper judgements about God’s reasons for permitting evil. I suggest that this thesis may extend over to our judgements about God’s reasons for self-revealing, and that when it does so, it can enable theists to remain (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Propagation of Suspension of Judgment.Aldo Filomeno - 2022 - Erkenntnis 89 (4):1327-1348.
    It is not uncommon in the history of science and philosophy to encounter crucial experiments or crucial objections the truth-value of which we are ignorant, that is, about which we suspend judgment. Should we ignore such objections? Contrary to widespread practice, I show that in and only in some circumstances they should not be ignored, for the epistemically rational doxastic attitude is to suspend judgment also about the hypothesis that the objection targets. In other words, suspension of judgment “propagates” from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Reforming responsibility practices without skepticism.Marcelo Fischborn - 2024 - Philosophical Psychology 37 (4):904-920.
    Derk Pereboom and Gregg Caruso argue that humans are never morally responsible for their actions and take that thesis as a starting point for a project whose ultimate goal is the reform of responsibility practices, which include expressions of praise, blame, and the institution of legal punishment. This paper shares the skeptical concern that current responsibility practices can be suboptimal and in need of change, but argues that a non-skeptical pursuit of those changes is viable and more promising. The main (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Disagreement.Diego E. Machuca - forthcoming - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This Element engages with the epistemic significance of disagreement, focusing on its skeptical implications. It examines various types of disagreement-motivated skepticism in ancient philosophy, ethics, philosophy of religion, and general epistemology. In each case, it favors suspension of judgment as the seemingly appropriate response to the realization of disagreement. One main line of argument pursued in the Element is that, since in real-life disputes we have limited or inaccurate information about both our own epistemic standing and the epistemic standing of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Strategy, Pyrrhonian Scepticism and the Allure of Madness.Sofia Jeppsson & Paul Lodge - forthcoming - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy.
    Justin Garson introduces the distinction between two views on Madness we encounter again and again throughout history: Madness as dysfunction, and Madness as strategy. On the latter view, Madness serves some purpose for the person experiencing it, even if it’s simultaneously harmful. The strategy view makes intelligible why Madness often holds a certain allure – even when it’s prima facie terrifying. Moreover, if Madness is a strategy in Garson’s metaphorical sense – if it serves a purpose – it makes sense (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Robb Dunphy: Hegel and the Problem of Beginning. Scepticism and Presuppositionlessness[REVIEW]Emmanuel Chaput - 2024 - Journal of Transcendental Philosophy 5 (1):69-74.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Non-Believing Jew: A Historical Survey of Judaism’s Engagement with Atheism.Daniel R. Langton - forthcoming - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism:1-19.
    How important is atheism for Jewish history and Jews for the history of atheism? Modern Jewish histories have tended to focus on Jewish secularization rather than atheism, and historical surveys of atheism in the West have tended to neglect the Jewish experience which is subsumed in the Judeo-Christian tradition. It is possible to make the case that the secularization narrative privileges social change over Jewish intellectual engagement with non-belief, and that just as Jewish and Christian conceptions of theism differ, so (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Anthropologie sceptique et modernité.Sylvia Giocanti (ed.) - 2022 - Lyon: ENS éditions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Akademicheskiĭ skeptit︠s︡izm: kollektivnai︠a︡ monografii︠a︡.R. V. Svetlov (ed.) - 2022 - Sankt-Peterburg: RKhGA.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Simone Luzzatto's Political Thought: Between Reason of State, Scepticism, and Jewish Political Tradition.Guido Bartolucci - 2024 - In Giuseppe Veltri & Michela Torbidoni (eds.), Simone Luzzatto’s Scepticism in the Context of Early Modern Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Simone Luzzatto's View on Jewish Ritual and Its Social Functions: A Consideration of His Sceptical Thought in the Intellectual Context of His Age.Mina Lee - 2024 - In Giuseppe Veltri & Michela Torbidoni (eds.), Simone Luzzatto’s Scepticism in the Context of Early Modern Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Simone Luzzatto's Scepticism in Light of Medieval Jewish Apologetics / Fabrizio Lelli "Everyone is Free to Decide to Investigate Every Kind of Discourse" Simone Luzzatto's Lettera Approbatoria to The Revealer of Secrets (1640?) by Samuel ha-Kohen da Pisa Lusitano.Anna Lissa - 2024 - In Giuseppe Veltri & Michela Torbidoni (eds.), Simone Luzzatto’s Scepticism in the Context of Early Modern Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Apologetic Strategies, Scepticism, and Empiricism in Simone Luzzatto's Works.Giuseppe Veltri - 2024 - In Giuseppe Veltri & Michela Torbidoni (eds.), Simone Luzzatto’s Scepticism in the Context of Early Modern Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. What Kind of (Sceptical) Work is Simone Luzzatto's Socrates?Josef Stern - 2024 - In Giuseppe Veltri & Michela Torbidoni (eds.), Simone Luzzatto’s Scepticism in the Context of Early Modern Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Outlines of skeptical-dogmatism: on disbelieving our philosophical views.Mark Walker - 2023 - Lanham: Lexington Books.
    Mark Walker argues for Skeptical-Dogmatism-the view that we should disbelieve our cherished philosophical views, such as beliefs about what makes for a good life, religious beliefs, and political beliefs. To not disbelieve one's preferred views in these contested matters is hubristic.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. How to take skepticism seriously.Adam Leite - 2024 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    This book argues that external world skepticism is false for straightforward reasons. To make this case it develops and defends a neglected methodological approach involving a distinctive process of first-person reflection. We begin within the practices, procedures, and commitments of ordinary life and science. We then seek some reason to think skepticism true, carefully scrutinizing all the most important arguments. Finding no reason to think it true and decisive reasons to think it false, we reject it. As the book shows, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Double Truth in the Writings of Medieval Jewish Averroists: An Esoteric Way of Appealing to Both Sceptics and Non-sceptics.Shalom Sadik - 2023 - In Racheli Haliva, Yoav Meyrav & Daniel Davies (eds.), Averroes and Averroism in Medieval Jewish Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Averroes's Influence upon Theological Responses to Scepticism in Late Medieval Jewish Philosophy.Shira Weiss - 2023 - In Racheli Haliva, Yoav Meyrav & Daniel Davies (eds.), Averroes and Averroism in Medieval Jewish Thought. Leiden ; Boston: BRILL.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Skepticism & Feminism.Lucy Alsip Vollbrecht - 2024 - Southwest Philosophy Review 40 (1):5-9.
    What is the value of Pyrrhonizing skepticism today? As an epistemologist, I am sympathetic to skepticism, but as a feminist, I am concerned by it. In this short paper, I’ll interrogate the troubled relationship between skepticism and feminism. More specifically, I’ll ask: Can feminists be skeptics? In the first half of the paper, I’ll articulate one feminist objection to skepticism. In the second half, I’ll suggest a pathway forward by which feminists can harness the power of the skeptical method to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The sceptic’s two kinds of assent and the question of the possibility of knowledge.Michael Frede - 1984 - In Richard Rorty, Jerome Schneewind, Skinner B. & Quentin (eds.), Philosophy in History: Essays in the Historiography of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 255–278.
    Traditionally one associates scepticism with the position that nothing is, or can be, known for certain. Hence it was only natural that for a long time one should have approached the ancient sceptics with the assumption that they were the first to try to establish or to defend the view that nothing is, or can be, known for certain, especially since there is abundant evidence which would have seemed to bear out the correctness of this approach. After all, extensive arguments (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Staying indoors: How phenomenal dogmatism solves the skeptical problem without going externalist.Berit Brogaard - 2016 - In . pp. 85-104.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Staying indoors: How phenomenal dogmatism solves the skeptical problem without going externalist.Berit Brogaard - 2016 - In Brett Coppenger & Michael Bergmann (eds.), Intellectual Assurance: Essays on Traditional Epistemic Internalism. Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press. pp. 85–104.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Deutsche skeptiker.Robert Saitschick - 1906 - Berlin,: E. Hofmann & co..
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Hors du scepticisme.François Roussel-Despierres - 1907 - Paris,: F. Alcan.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Oakeshott’s skepticism, politics and aesthetics Oakeshott’s skepticism, politics and aesthetics, ed. Eric Kos. Palgrave McMillan studies in classical liberalism, London, Palgrave Macmillan, 2021, 232 pp., $119.99 (hardback), ISBN: 3030830543; ISBN: 978-3030830540. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Corey - forthcoming - History of European Ideas.
    When Michael Oakeshott died in 1990, there were only a handful of scholarly monographs about his thought. Twenty years later, in contrast, the burgeoning number of studies of his thought prompted o...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Reason, Bias, and Inquiry: The Crossroads of Epistemology and Psychology, editted by Nathan Ballantyne and David Dunning.Christos Kyriacou - forthcoming - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism:1-6.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Iterated Knowledge.Simon Goldstein - 2024 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    You omega know p when you possess every iteration of knowledge of p. This book argues that omega knowledge plays a central role in philosophy. In particular, the book argues that omega knowledge is necessary for permissible assertion, action, inquiry, and belief. Although omega knowledge plays this important role, existing theories of omega knowledge are unsatisfying. One theory, KK, identifies knowledge with omega knowledge. This theory struggles to accommodate cases of inexact knowledge. The other main theory is skeptical, claiming that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Consciousness, Time, and Scepticism in Hume's Thought.Lorne Falkenstein - 2024 - New York: Routledge.
    David Hume’s philosophical work presents the reader with a perplexing mix of constructive accounts of empirically guided belief and destructive sceptical arguments against all belief. This book reconciles this conflict by showing that Hume intended his scepticism to be remedial. It immunizes us against the influence of “unphilosophical” causes of belief, determining us to proportion our beliefs to the evidence. In making this case, this book develops Humean positions on topics Hume did not discuss in detail but that are of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Fully Caused and Flourishing? Incompatibilist Free Will Skepticism and Its Implications for Personal Well-Being.Stephan Tegtmeier - 2024 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 15 (1):149-166.
    Previous research associates free will skepticism with adverse well-being effects. However, it is doubtful that skeptical participants in these studies disbelieved in the incompatibilist notion of what it means to have free will. This is one of the first studies to exclusively examine such skeptics. A sample of 167 participants who claimed to believe that there is no free will responded to an online survey. After examining whether participants in fact disbelieved in the incompatibilist concept, they were asked to describe (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. “Did Descartes Read Sextus’s Outlines of Pyrrhonism?” A “Sceptical” Response.Paul O’Mahoney - forthcoming - The European Legacy:1-9.
    This article has been invited by The European Legacy editors as a response to Ayumu Tamura’s “Did Descartes Read Sextus’s Outlines of Pyrrhonism?” which continues the promising lines of enquiry he...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. A Skeptical View of Integralism.Elizabeth Corey - 2023 - Nova et Vetera 21 (3):919-941.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:A Skeptical View of IntegralismElizabeth CoreyNo observer of the American right could say that the past decade has been boring. In recent years, people who formerly called themselves conservatives have become integralists, "national conservatives," "common good" conservatives, and "postliberals." They reject the fusionism that formerly brought libertarians into alliances with paleo- and neo-conservatives. They argue that principles of limited government and individual rights no longer suffice in an age (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Can We Know Whether Scepticism Is Right or Wrong? Reid's Criticisms and Hume's Answer.Claire Etchegaray - unknown
  36. Can We Know Anything? A Debate.Bryan Frances & Michael Huemer - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    "In this book, Michael Huemer and Bryan Frances debate whether - and how - we can gain knowledge of the world outside of our own minds. Starting with opening statements, the debate moves through two rounds of replies. -/- Frances argues that we lack knowledge because, for example, we cannot rule out the possibility that we are brains in vats being artificially stimulated in such a way as to create an illusion of living in the real world. Huemer disagrees that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. The Centrality of the Imagination in Scepticism and Animal Faith.Richard Marc Rubin - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 177-192.
    Rubin examines the central role of the imagination in Santayana’s life and works. He shows how the imagination is fundamental to Santayana’s sceptical inquiry in SAF and a necessary condition for knowledge about the material world and the mind. The imagination is a predominant theme in Santayana’s life and work. Even as a boy, he found himself solitary and unhappy in America and “attached only to a persistent dream life.” He published several literary works, including three plays, a novel, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Hermes as an Interpreter and the Guide to Hades: Re-reading “The Lord Chandos Letter” with Reference to Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith.Katarzyna Kremplewska - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 341-371.
    Kremplewska discusses how Santayana’s engagement with radical scepticism has a cross-disciplinary import and can be seen as a response to some of the intellectual and moral concerns prominent in the literature of the first half of the twentieth century. She employs Santayana’s analysis of scepticism as the basis for an interpretive philosophical re-reading of Hugo von Hofmannsthal’s “The Lord Chandos Letter.”.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. G. Santayana (Scepticism and Animal Faith, 1923) and E. Husserl (Cartesianische Meditationen, 1929), Readers of R. Descartes. [REVIEW]Daniel Moreno - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 325-339.
    Moreno shows that Santayana believed he had found an ally regarding his doctrine of essence in the philosophy of Husserl. He then reveals the parallels and differences between Santayana’s and Husserl’s philosophies, bringing each thinker’s ideas into sharper relief.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Reconstruction from Ultimate Scepticism.Angus Kerr-Lawson - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 163-173.
    Kerr-Lawson discusses the reconstruction of knowledge Santayana undertakes in the second half of SAF. Kerr-Lawson explains Santayana’s general approach to the reconstruction, as well as his treatment of a priori knowledge, factual knowledge, and the traditional definition of knowledge as justified true belief.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Scepticism, Anti-scepticism, and Santayana’s Singularity.Daniel Pinkas - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 73-94.
    Considering Santayana’s treatment of scepticism in relation to Descartes and Hume, as well as twentieth-century philosophers such as Wittgenstein, Moore, and Strawson, helps make the case for the singularity of Santayana’s approach. The analysis of the different positions also reveals some of the commonalities Santayana shares with other (including later) sceptical philosophers.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Natural Knowledge and Transcendental Criticism in Scepticism and Animal Faith.Paul Forster - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 125-147.
    Forster explains how Santayana squares his commitment to naturalism with his reliance on methods of transcendental criticism. Rather than view naturalism and transcendental criticism as antagonistic, Santayana reconciles them in an account of human knowledge that he considers more comprehensive than either is alone.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The Last Sceptic: Santayana, Descartes, and the External World.Douglas McDermid - 2024 - In Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.), The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 33-56.
    McDermid clarifies the nature of Santayana’s scepticism by examining his response to the traditional sceptical problem of the external world. The chapter explains in what sense we can regard Santayana as a sceptic and in what sense Santayana is a critic of the sceptical method promulgated by Descartes.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. The Palgrave Companion to George Santayana’s Scepticism and Animal Faith.Martin A. Coleman & Glenn Tiller (eds.) - 2024 - Springer Nature Switzerland.
    The first of its kind, this project is a collection of critical and interpretive essays on George Santayana’s seminal work in American philosophy, Scepticism and Animal Faith (1923), 100 years after its first edition. The reader will be guided through the intricacies of Scepticism and Animal Faith by expert scholars. This book is a companion to Scepticism and Animal Faith for both first-time readers and readers intimately familiar with this work.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The Debasing Demon Resurrected.Mikael Janvid - 2024 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 14 (1):28-50.
    The aim of this paper is to strike a blow for the relevance of the debasing demon originally summoned by Jonathan Schaffer. I do so by, first, defending this skeptical hypothesis against critics and, second, by noting important similarities between the workings of this demon and implicit bias. Along the way, I elucidate the structure of this skeptical argument by comparing it to other better-known skeptical arguments. I also clarify the kinds of access the debasing skeptical scenario, as well as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Hegel’s Criticism of Pyrrhonism.Joris Spigt - 2024 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 14 (1):1-27.
    This paper presents Hegel’s criticism of two central ideas of Pyrrhonism: the importance of stating only how things appear and Pyrrhonism as a way of life. After providing a sketch of the main features of Pyrrhonism, the paper lays out and critically evaluates Hegel’s largely unexamined argument against Pyrrhonism in his early 1802 essay on skepticism. Hegel claims that the Pyrrhonist’s appeal to appearance renders Pyrrhonism philosophically vacuous: insofar as Pyrrhonism merely describes the subjective contents of the Pyrrhonist’s mind, it (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Biased Knowers, Biased Reasons, and Biased Philosophers.Michael Veber - forthcoming - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism:1-11.
    In Bias: A Philosophical Study, Thomas Kelly offers a response to epistemological skepticism grounded in his account of bias. According to Kelly, the classic argument for skepticism is best understood as an attempt to show that our commonsense beliefs are biased against the skeptic. Kelly grants that this is true but argues that biased beliefs can still be knowledge. I offer two objections. First, if we are applying Kelly’s theory of bias to skepticism, it is best to think of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Non-Ideal Epistemology, written by Robin McKenna.Angela O’Sullivan - 2023 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 14 (1):66-72.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. L’incertitude chez les Anciens et les Modernes, written by Anastasios Brenner & Brigitte Pérez-Jean (dir.).Enzo Godinot - 2023 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 14 (1):51-59.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Epistemology of Spirit Beliefs, written by Hans Van Eyghen.Evan Fales - 2023 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 14 (1):79-85.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 5045