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  1. How to Resist Musical Dogmatism: The Aim and Methods of Pyrrhonian Inquiry in Sextus Empiricus' Against the Musicologists (Math. 6).Mate Veres - 2021 - In Francesco Pelosi & Federico Maria Petrucci (eds.), Music and Philosophy in the Roman Empire. Cambridge University Press. pp. 108-130.
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  2. The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy.Kelly Arenson (ed.) - 2020 - Routledge.
    Hellenistic philosophy concerns the thought of the Epicureans, Stoics, and Skeptics, the most influential philosophical groups in the era between the death of Alexander the Great and the defeat of the last Greek stronghold in the ancient world. The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy provides accessible yet rigorous introductions to the theories of knowledge, ethics, and physics belonging to each of the three schools. It explores the fascinating ways in which interschool rivalries shaped the philosophies of the era, and offers (...)
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  3. Anaxarchus on Indifference, Happiness, and Convention.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Ancient Greek Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 680-699.
    Anaxarchus accompanied Pyrrho on Alexander the Great’s expedition to India and was known as “the Happy Man” because of his impassivity and contentment. Our sources on his philosophy are limited and largely consist of anecdotes about his interactions with Pyrrho and Alexander, but they allow us to reconstruct a distinctive ethical position. It overlaps with several disparate ethical traditions but is not merely a hodge-podge; it hangs together as a unified whole. Like Pyrrho, he asserts that things are indifferent in (...)
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  4. The Challenges of the Modes of Agrippa.Joseph B. Bullock - 2016 - Apeiron 49 (4):409-435.
    The standard “gladiatorial” interpretation of the Modes of Agrippa has undergone several recent attacks. Scholars have criticized it because it seems to portray the skeptic as a dogmatist about logical support and because it does not treat all five Modes as part of the system. Although some have attempted to patch up the standard interpretation to address these issues, I raise a further problem: The gladiatorial interpretation cannot make sense of the skeptic using the Modes on herself, to suspend her (...)
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