Scientific Method

Edited by Darrell P. Rowbottom (Lingnan University)
Assistant editor: Zili Dong (University of Western Ontario)
Related categories

4367 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 4367
Material to categorize
  1. SÖZDE-BİLİM UYGULAMALARI YOLUYLA ÜSTÜN ZEKALI VE YETENEKLİ 4. SINIF ÖĞRENCİLERİNİN BİLİMSEL SÜREÇ BECERİ DÜZEYLERİNİN BELİRLENMESİ.Eylül Başkurt Sayhan - 2019 - Dissertation, Ege
    The aim of this study is to determine the perceptions of gifted and talented 4th grade primary school students towards pseudoscience, as well as their awareness of scientific process skills by using pseudoscientific scenarios. Specifically, the aim is to reveal the students’ knowledge about crystals, which is a pseudoscientific issue, views on treatments carried out with crystals, experiences about experiments, knowledge about scientific process skills and scientific process skills used in proposing research methodology for claims about crystals’ healing abilities.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. SÖZDE-BİLİMSEL KONULAR.Oktay Kızkapan - 2021 - Ankara, Türkiye: Pegem Akademi.
    Sözde-bilim ile ilgili bu tartışmalar uluslararası literatürde yapılıyor olsa da Türkiye’de henüz bu konuların eleştirel olarak ele alındığı söylenemez. Dolayısıyla sözde-bilimlerin eleştirel olarak ele alındığı öğrenme ortamlarının öğrencilerin bilime ve sözde-bilime ilişkin algılarına etkisi üzerine yapılacak araştırmalar konunun daha iyi anlaşılmasını sağlayabilir ve belki de ilerideki program değişiklerinde öğretim programlarında sözde-bilimin yer bulmasının yolunu açabilir.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Kuram Seçimi, Eksik Belirlenim ve Thomas Kuhn.Alper Bilgehan Yardımcı - 2021 - Londra, Birleşik Krallık: Ijopec Publication.
    One of the main purposes of science is to explain natural phenomena by increasing our understanding of the physical world and to make predictions about the future based on these explanations. In this context, scientific theories can be defined as large-scale explanations of phenomena. In the historical process, scientists have made various choices among the theories they encounter at the point of solving the problems related to their fields of study. This process, which can be called ‘theory choice’, is one (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Philosophical Foundations of Mixed Methods Research.Yafeng Shan - 2022 - Philosophy Compass 17 (1):e12804.
    This paper provides a critical review of the debate over the philosophical foundations of mixed methods research and examines the notion of philosophical foundations. It distinguishes axiology-oriented from ontology-oriented philosophical foundations. It also identifies three different senses of philosophical foundations of mixed methods research. The weak sense of philosophical foundations (e.g., pragmatism) merely allows the possibility of the integration of both quantitative and qualitative methods/data/designs. The moderate sense of philosophical foundations (e.g., transformativism) provide a good reason to use mixed methods (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Literalist Fallacy & the Free Energy Principle: Model Building, Scientific Realism and Instrumentalism.Michael David Kirchhoff, Julian Kiverstein & Ian Robertson - manuscript
    Disagreement about how best to think of the relation between theories and the realities they represent has a longstanding and venerable history. We take up this debate in relation to the free energy principle (FEP) - a contemporary framework in computational neuroscience, theoretical biology and the philosophy of cognitive science. The FEP is very ambitious, extending from the brain sciences to the biology of self-organisation. In this context, some find apparent discrepancies between the map (the FEP) and the territory (target (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. How Universities Can Best Respond to the Climate Crisis and Other Global Problems.Nicholas Maxwell - 2021 - Philosophies 1.
    The world is in a state of crisis. Global problems that threaten our future include: the climate crisis; the destruction of natural habitats, catastrophic loss of wild life, and mass extinction of species; lethal modern war; the spread of modern armaments; the menace of nuclear weapons; pollution of earth, sea and air; rapid rise in the human population; increasing antibiotic resistance; the degradation of democratic politics, brought about in part by the internet. It is not just that universities around the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Du Châtelet on Sufficient Reason and Empirical Explanation.Aaron Wells - 2021 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 59 (4):629-655.
  8. How to Defend Scientism.Petri Turunen, Ilkka Pättiniemi, Ilmari Hirvonen, Johan Hietanen & Henrik Saarinen - forthcoming - In Moti Mizrahi (ed.), For and Against Scientism: Science, Methodology, and the Future of Philosophy. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this chapter we examine Moti Mizrahi’s claim that philosophers’ opposition of scientism is founded on their worry that scientism poses “a threat to the soul or essence of philosophy as an a priori discipline”. We find Mizrahi’s methodology for testing this thesis wanting. We offer an alternative hypothesis for the increased resistance of scientism: the antipathy started as a reaction to the New Atheist movement. We also consider two varieties of weak scientism, narrow and broad, and argue that narrow (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Systematicity: The Nature of Science[REVIEW]Mariam Thalos - 2015 - Mind 124:351–357.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Logical Maximalism in the Empirical Sciences.Brîncuș Constantin C. - 2021 - In Parusniková Zuzana & Merritt David (eds.), Karl Popper's Science and Philosophy. Springer. pp. 171-184.
    K. R. Popper distinguished between two main uses of logic, the demonstrational one, in mathematical proofs, and the derivational one, in the empirical sciences. These two uses are governed by the following methodological constraints: in mathematical proofs one ought to use minimal logical means (logical minimalism), while in the empirical sciences one ought to use the strongest available logic (logical maximalism). In this paper I discuss whether Popper’s critical rationalism is compatible with a revision of logic in the empirical sciences, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Abstraction and Generalization in the Logic of Science: Cases From Nineteenth-Century Scientific Practice.Claudia Cristalli & Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen - 2021 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 11 (1):93-121.
    Abstraction and generalization are two processes of reasoning that have a special role in the construction of scientific theories and models. They have been important parts of the scientific method ever since the nineteenth century. A philosophical and historical analysis of scientific practices shows how abstraction and generalization found their way into the theory of the logic of science of the nineteenth-century philosopher Charles S. Peirce. Our case studies include the scientific practices of Francis Galton and John Herschel, who introduced (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Strategic Justice, Conventions, and Game Theory: Themes in the Philosophy of Peter Vanderschraaf.John Thrasher & Michael Moehler (eds.) - forthcoming - London/Berlin/New York: Springer.
    For more than twenty years, Peter Vanderschraaf’s work has combined rigorous game-theoretic analysis, innovative use of (social) scientific method, and normative analysis in the context of the social contract. Vanderschraaf’s work has influenced a significant interdisciplinary field of study and culminated in the publication of his book, Strategic Justice: Convention and Problems of Balancing Divergent Interests (OUP, 2019). Building upon his previous work, Vanderschraaf developed a new theory of justice (justice-as-convention) that, despite a mutual advantage approach, considers the most vulnerable (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. A Logically Neutral(Ish) Framework for Empirical Testing.Luis Felipe Bartolo Alegre - manuscript
    In this paper, I propose a formal framework for modelling the process of testing empirical statements, hypotheses, theories, and research programmes. Unlike the diverse forms of falsificationism, this framework does not require any commitment to classical logic or to any specific system of logic, as it aims to be useful regardless of the logic we presuppose. On this regard, the paper will focus on how this framework applies to two logical contexts: the classical and the paraconsistent contexts. I will show (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Making Transdisciplinarity Work: An Epistemology of Inclusive Development and Innovation.David Ludwig & Birgit Boogaard - 2021 - In The Politics of Knowledge in Inclusive Development and Innovation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Vincenzo Galilei’s Musicology and Galileo’s Science: Methodological Comparison and Contrast.Maurice A. Finocchiaro - 2020 - Isis 111 (4):740-758.
  16. On Conditional Theology: John Webster and Theological Reason.Rolfe King - 2020 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 81 (5):485-503.
    I illustrate the subject of conditional theology through discussing John Webster’s theology. This is a form of philosophical theology, with interesting links to natural theology, but not subject to Barthian strictures about natural theology. Webster started out with a Barthian emphasis, but later increasingly drew on Aquinas, emphasising God’s aseity. Webster, though, continued to emphasise the priority of the revelation of God as triune, and to resist what he saw as abstract notions of God deriving from natural theology and philosophy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Boundaries of Reasoning in Cases: The Visual Psychoanalysis of René Spitz.Rachel Weitzenkorn - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):66-84.
    This article argues that the foundational separation between psychoanalysis and experimental psychology was challenged in important ways by psychoanalytic infant researchers. Through a close examination of American psychoanalyst René Spitz, it extends John Forrester’s conception of reasoning in cases outside classic psychoanalytic practices. Specifically, the article interrogates the foundations of reasoning in cases—the individual, language, and the doctor–patient relationship—to show how these are reimagined in relation to the structures of American developmental psychology. The article argues that the staunch separation of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18. ‘If P? Then What?’ Thinking Within, with, and From Cases.Mary S. Morgan - 2020 - History of the Human Sciences 33 (3-4):198-217.
    The provocative paper by John Forrester ‘If p, Then What? Thinking in Cases’ opened up the question of case thinking as a separate mode of reasoning in the sciences. Case-based reasoning is certainly endemic across a number of sciences, but it has looked different according to where it has been found. This article investigates this mode of science – namely thinking in cases – by questioning the different interpretations of ‘If p?’ and exploring the different interpretative responses of what follows (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  19. How Not to Criticise Scientism.Johan Hietanen, Petri Turunen, Ilmari Hirvonen, Janne Karisto, Ilkka Pättiniemi & Henrik Saarinen - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (4):522-547.
    This paper argues that the main global critiques of scientism lose their punch because they rely on an uncharitable definition of their target. It focuses on epistemological scientism and divides it into four categories in terms of how strong (science is the only source of knowledge) or weak (science is the best source of knowledge) and how narrow (only natural sciences) or broad (all sciences or at least not only the natural sciences) they are. Two central arguments against scientism, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. For Reflexivity as an Epistemic Criterion of Ontological Coherence and Virtuous Social Theorizing.Christoforos Bouzanis - 2017 - History of the Human Sciences 30 (5):125-146.
    This article offers an approach that combines, on the one hand, the philosophical notion of reflexivity, which is related to the ideas of self-reference and paradox, and, on the other hand, the sociological discussion of epistemic reflexivity as a problem of coherence, which was mainly initiated by certain branches of ethnomethodology and social constructionism. This combinatory approach argues for reflexivity as an epistemic criterion of ontological coherence, which suggests that social ontologies should account for the possibility of self-reflective subjectivity – (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. The Methodological Roles of Tolerance and Conventionalism in the Philosophy of Mathematics: Reconsidering Carnap's Logic of Science.Emerson P. Doyle - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Western Ontario
    This dissertation makes two primary contributions. The first three chapters develop an interpretation of Carnap's Meta-Philosophical Program which places stress upon his methodological analysis of the sciences over and above the Principle of Tolerance. Most importantly, I suggest, is that Carnap sees philosophy as contiguous with science—as a part of the scientific enterprise—so utilizing the very same methods and subject to the same limitations. I argue that the methodological reforms he suggests for philosophy amount to philosophy as the explication of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. John Herschel's Optical Researches and the Development of His Ideas on Method and Causality.Gregory Good - 1987 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (1):1.
  23. Historical and Philosophical Dimensions of Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW]J. K. J. - 1978 - Review of Metaphysics 32 (1):130-131.
    Part four of the Proceedings of the Fifth International Congress of Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science, London, Ontario, Canada, 1975, contains fifteen papers, which are loosely organized under three general headings. The first, and by far the longest, part of the book consists of ten papers concerned with the history of methodology, science, and philosophy of science. The second part contains two essays on the history of the concept of matter and material causality. The three papers constituting part three (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Metaphysical Presuppositions of Scientific Practice: ‘Atomism’ Vs. ‘Wholism’.Alexander Rueger & W. David Sharp - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):1-20.
    A certain order or stability of nature has often been seen as a necessary presupposition of many of our scientific practices, in particular of our use of information gained in one kind of circumstance to explain or predict what happens in quite different situations. John Maynard Keynes and, more recently, Nancy Cartwright have argued that these practices commit us to the existence of stable ‘atoms’ or ‘natures’ or ‘tendencies.’ The phenomena we observe in nature are, on this view, the result (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Commitments and Styles of European Scientific Thinking.Alistair C. Crombie - 1996 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 11 (1):65-76.
  26. Language, Logic, and Method.R. S. Cohen & Marx W. Wartofsky (eds.) - 1983 - Springer, Dordrecht.
  27. So Simple a Thing as a Star: The Eddington–Jeans Debate Over Astrophysical Phenomenology.Matthew Stanley - 2007 - British Journal for the History of Science 40 (1):53-82.
    Theoretical astrophysics emerged as a significant research programme with the construction of a series of stellar models by A. S. Eddington. This paper examines the controversies surrounding those models as a way of understanding the development and justification of new theoretical technologies. In particular, it examines the challenges raised against Eddington by James Jeans, and explores how the two astronomers championed different visions of what it meant to do science. Jeans argued for a scientific method based on certainty and completeness, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Learning From the Past.James Robert Brown - 1989 - In James Robert Brown & Jürgen Mittelstrass (eds.), An Intimate Relation. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. pp. 343-367.
  29. A Matter of Order: A Controversy Between Heisenberg and London.Yorgos Goudaroulis - 1990 - In Pantelis Nicolacopoulos (ed.), Greek Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science. pp. 279-291.
    The study of controversies is not only helpful for the further understanding of the subtleties of the theories involved, but it also contributes to the clarification of a series of issues related to the problem of theory choice. Discussions and disagreements — however heated — over two theories do not necessarily entail the features of what I would like to consider as controversies. This is especially so when there is a crucial experiment that can be performed in a relatively short (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Form, Reason, and Method.Mary Tiles - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. Oxford University Press.
    This article traces the development of an ideal of method that was inspired by Ramon Lull and subsequently found new expressions in many of the proponents of a new science in early modern Europe. It investigates the unravelling of the link between scientific reason and logic and their reweaving in a pattern that integrated scientific reason with mathematics and the discovery of mathematically formulated relationships. It discusses how the transformations of one family of concepts that include proportion, ratio, and measure (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Robert Boyle's 'Designe About Natural History'.Peter Anstey & Michael Hunter - 2008 - Early Science and Medicine 13 (2):83-126.
    This paper provides an analysis of Robert Boyle's most detailed discussion of the Baconian method of natural history. In a long letter to Henry Oldenburg dated 13 June 1666 and in ancillary manuscript material, Boyle spells out the method or 'Designe' by which he believes experimental programs in natural philosophy should be written up. The 'Designe' is enormously important in giving a clear statement of the precise contours of Boyle's Baconian methodology and providing a key to understanding the rationale, composition (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  32. A New Disease of the Intellect? Some Reflections on the Therapeutic Value of Peter Winch’s Philosophy for Social and Cultural Studies of Science.Michael Lynch - 2000 - History of the Human Sciences 13 (1):140-156.
  33. What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Science? The Concept of Replication and the Methodology of Experiments.Jutta Schickore - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):513-532.
    Scientists and philosophers generally agree that the replication of experiments is a key ingredient of good and successful scientific practice. “One-offs“ are not significant; experiments must be replicable to be considered valid and important. But the term “replication“ has been used in a number of ways, and it is therefore quite difficult to appraise the meaning and significance of replications. I consider how history may help - and has helped - with this task. I propose that: 1) Studies of past (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
Confirmation
  1. The Bayes' Factor: The Coherent Measure for Hypothesis Confirmation.Franco Taroni, Paolo Garbolino, Silvia Bozza & Colin Aitken - forthcoming - Law, Probability and Risk.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Role of Meta-Empirical Theory Confirmation in the Acceptance of Atomism.Richard Dawid - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 90:50-60.
    The universal acceptance of atomism in physics and chemistry in the early 20th century went along with an altered view on the epistemic status of microphysical conjectures. Contrary to the prevalent understanding during the 19th century, on the new view unobservable objects could be ‘discovered’. It is argued in the present paper that this shift can be connected to the implicit integration of elements of meta-empirical theory assessment into the concept of theory confirmation.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Scientific Realism and Empirical Confirmation: A Puzzle.Simon Allzén - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 90:153-159.
    Scientific realism driven by inference to the best explanation (IBE) takes empirically confirmed objects to exist,independent,paceempiricism, of whether those objects are observable or not. This kind of realism, it has beenclaimed, does not need probabilistic reasoning to justify the claim that these objects exist. But I show that thereare scientific contexts in which a non-probabilistic IBE-driven realism leads to a puzzle. Since IBE can be appliedin scientific contexts in which empirical confirmation has not yet been reached, realists will in these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Are Scientific Models of Life Testable? A Lesson From Simpson's Paradox.Prasanta S. Bandyopadhyay, Don Dcruz, Nolan Grunska & Mark Greenwood - 2020 - Sci 1 (3).
    We address the need for a model by considering two competing theories regarding the origin of life: (i) the Metabolism First theory, and (ii) the RNA World theory. We discuss two interrelated points, namely: (i) Models are valuable tools for understanding both the processes and intricacies of origin-of-life issues, and (ii) Insights from models also help us to evaluate the core objection to origin-of-life theories, called “the inefficiency objection”, which is commonly raised by proponents of both the Metabolism First theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. A Problem for Confirmation Measure Z.Branden Fitelson - 2021 - Philosophy of Science 88 (4):726-730.
    In this article, I present a serious problem for confirmation measure Z.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. “Adding Up” Reasons: Lessons for Reductive and Nonreductive Approaches.Shyam Nair - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):38-88.
    How do multiple reasons combine to support a conclusion about what to do or believe? This question raises two challenges: How can we represent the strength of a reason? How do the strengths of multiple reasons combine? Analogous challenges about confirmation have been answered using probabilistic tools. Can reductive and nonreductive theories of reasons use these tools to answer their challenges? Yes, or more exactly: reductive theories can answer both challenges. Nonreductive theories, with the help of a result in confirmation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Meta-Empirical Support for Eliminative Reasoning.C. D. McCoy - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 90:15-29.
    Eliminative reasoning is a method that has been employed in many significant episodes in the history of science. It has also been advocated by some philosophers as an important means for justifying well-established scientific theories. Arguments for how eliminative reasoning is able to do so, however, have generally relied on a too narrow conception of evidence, and have therefore tended to lapse into merely heuristic or pragmatic justifications for their conclusions. This paper shows how a broader conception of evidence not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Testability and Viability: Is Inflationary Cosmology “Scientific”?Richard Dawid & C. D. McCoy - manuscript
    We provide a philosophical reconstruction and analysis of the debate on the scientific status of cosmic inflation that has played out in recent years. In a series of critical papers, Ijjas et al. have questioned the scientificality of the current views on cosmic inflation. Proponents of cosmic inflation have in turn defended the scientific credentials of their approach. We argue that, while this defense, narrowly construed, is successful against Ijjas et al., the latter's reasoning does point to a significant epistemic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Does the Dome Defeat the Material Theory of Induction?William Peden - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    According to John D. Norton's Material Theory of Induction, all inductive inferences are justified by local facts, rather than their formal features or some grand principles of nature's uniformity. Recently, Richard Dawid (2015) has offered a challenge to this theory: in an adaptation of Norton's own celebrated "Dome" thought experiment, it seems that there are certain inductions that are intuitively reasonable, but which do not have any local facts that could serve to justify them in accordance with Norton's requirements. Dawid's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Tracking Confirmation.Igor Douven - 2021 - Philosophy of Science 88 (3):398-414.
    Confirmation is a graded notion: evidence can confirm a hypothesis to a greater or lesser degree. There has been debate about how to measure degree of confirmation. Starting from the observation that we would like evidence to be a discriminating indicator of truth, we conduct computer simulations to determine how well the various known measures of confirmation predict the extent to which a given piece of evidence fulfills that role, given a hypothesis of interest. The outcomes show that some measures (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Inquiry and Confirmation.Arianna Falbo - forthcoming - Analysis.
    A puzzle arises when combining two individually plausible, yet jointly incompatible, norms of inquiry. On the one hand, it seems that one shouldn’t inquire into a question while believing an answer to that question. But, on the other hand, it seems rational to inquire into a question while believing its answer, if one is seeking confirmation. Millson (2021), who has recently identified this puzzle, suggests a possible solution, though he notes that it comes with significant costs. I offer an alternative (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. The epistemic consequences of pragmatic value-laden scientific inference.Adam P. Kubiak & Paweł Kawalec - 2021 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 11 (2):1-26.
    In this work, we explore the epistemic import of the value-ladenness of Neyman-Pearson’s Theory of Testing Hypotheses by reconstructing and extending Daniel Steel’s argument for the legitimate influence of pragmatic values on scientific inference. We focus on how to properly understand N-P’s pragmatic value-ladenness and the epistemic reliability of N-P. We develop an account of the twofold influence of pragmatic values on N-P’s epistemic reliability and replicability. We refer to these two distinguished aspects as “direct” and “indirect”. We discuss the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Framework Confirmation by Newtonian Abduction.Erik Curiel - 2020 - Synthese 198 (Suppl 16):3813-3851.
    The analysis of theory-confirmation generally takes the deductive form: show that a theory in conjunction with physical data and auxiliary hypotheses yield a prediction about phenomena; verify the prediction; provide a quantitative measure of the degree of theory-confirmation this yields. The issue of confirmation for an entire framework either does not arise, or is dismissed in so far as frameworks are thought not to be the kind of thing that admits scientific confirmation. I argue that there is another form of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. One World Versus Many: The Inadequacy of Everettian Accounts of Evolution, Probability, and Scientific Confirmation.Adrian Kent - 2010 - In Simon Saunders, Jonathan Barrett, Adrian Kent & David Wallace (eds.), Many Worlds?: Everett, Quantum Theory, & Reality. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  15. Confirmation Bias in Information Search, Interpretation, and Memory Recall: Evidence From Reasoning About Four Controversial Topics.Dáša Vedejová & Vladimíra Čavojová - forthcoming - Thinking and Reasoning:1-28.
    Confirmation bias is often used as an umbrella term for many related phenomena. Information searches, evidence interpretation, and memory recall are the three main components of the thinking proces...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Externalismo semántico y subdeterminación empírica. Respuesta a un desafío al realismo científico.Marc Jiménez Rolland - 2017 - Dissertation, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana
    I offer an explicit account of the underdetermination thesis as well as of the many challenges it poses to scientific realism; a way to answer to these challenges is explored and outlined, by shifting attention to the content of theories. I argue that, even if we have solid grounds (as I contend we do) to support that some varieties of the underdetermination thesis are true, scientific realism can still offer an adequate picture of the aims and achievements of science.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Optimization of Scientific Reasoning: A Data-Driven Approach.Vlasta Sikimić - 2019 - Dissertation,
    Scientific reasoning represents complex argumentation patterns that eventually lead to scientific discoveries. Social epistemology of science provides a perspective on the scientific community as a whole and on its collective knowledge acquisition. Different techniques have been employed with the goal of maximization of scientific knowledge on the group level. These techniques include formal models and computer simulations of scientific reasoning and interaction. Still, these models have tested mainly abstract hypothetical scenarios. The present thesis instead presents data-driven approaches in social epistemology (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 4367