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  1. Optimizing Political Influence: A Jury Theorem with Dynamic Competence and Dependence.Thomas Mulligan - forthcoming - Social Choice and Welfare.
    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate, formally, an ambiguity in the exercise of political influence. To wit: A voter might exert influence with an eye toward maximizing the probability that the political system (1) obtains the correct (e.g. just) outcome, or (2) obtains the outcome that he judges to be correct (just). And these are two very different things. A variant of Condorcet's Jury Theorem which incorporates the effect of influence on group competence and interdependence is developed. Analytic (...)
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  2. The Terra Nullius of Intellectual Property.Eva Hilberg - forthcoming - Ethics and International Affairs:1-10.
    The current debate over the global distribution of COVID-19 vaccines once again highlights the many shortcomings of the modern intellectual property system, especially when it comes to equitable access to medicines. This essay argues that the conceptual center of struggles over access to new pharmaceuticals rests in the IP system's colonial legacy, which perceives the world as uncharted territory that is ripe for discovery and ownership. This vision of the world as a blank canvas, or terra nullius, sets aside any (...)
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  3. Justice Between Wars.David Rodin - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):435-442.
    One way to tell the story of contemporary ethics of war is as a gradual expansion of the period of time to which theorists attend in relation to war, from ad bellum and in bello to post bellum and ex bello. Ned Dobos, in his new book, Ethics, Security, and the War-Machine, invites us to expand this attention further to the period between wars, which he calls jus ante bellum. In this essay, I explore two significant implications of this shift (...)
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  4. War Crimes and the Asymmetry Myth.C. A. J. Coady - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):381-394.
    The “asymmetry myth” is that war crimes are committed by one's enemies but never, or hardly ever, by one's own combatants. The myth involves not only a common failure to acknowledge our own actual war crimes but also inadequate reactions when we are forced to recognize them. It contributes to the high likelihood that wars, just or unjust in their causes, will have a high moral cost. This cost, moreover, is a matter needing consideration in the jus ante bellum circumstances (...)
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  5. Democracy and the Preparation and Conduct of War.Neta C. Crawford - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):353-365.
    In Ethics, Security, and the War-Machine, Ned Dobos highlights several negative consequences the preparation for war has for individuals and states. But he misses what I consider perhaps the most significant consequence of military mobilization for states, especially democracies: how war and the preparation for it affect deliberative politics. While many argue that all states, including democracies, require strong militaries—and there is some evidence that long wars can build democracies and states—I focus on the other effects of militarization and war (...)
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  6. War by Agreement: A Contractarian Ethics of War, Yitzhak Benbaji and Daniel Statman (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019), 240 Pp., $65 Cloth, $52.99 eBook. [REVIEW]Claire Finkelstein - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):483-486.
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  7. Nation-States, Empires, Wars, Hostilities.Cheyney Ryan - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):367-379.
    A starting point for thinking about war and preparations for war is that today the average citizen in Western countries has absolutely no interest in fighting in a war him or herself. The best study of this phenomenon rightly notes that what might be called the “great refusal” of ordinary people to involve themselves in actual war making reflects what might be called the “great disillusionment” with war itself. However, this has not meant the end of war, or of preparations (...)
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  8. Deconstructing Nonviolence and the War-Machine: Unarmed Coups, Nonviolent Power, and Armed Resistance.Christopher J. Finlay - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):421-433.
    Proponents of nonviolent tactics often highlight the extent to which they rival arms as effective means of resistance. Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan, for instance, compare civil resistance favorably to armed insurrection as means of bringing about progressive political change. In Ethics, Security, and the War-Machine, Ned Dobos cites their work in support of the claim that similar methods—organized according to Gene Sharp's idea of “civilian-based defense”—may be substituted for regular armed forces in the face of international aggression. I deconstruct (...)
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  9. The Global Politics of Health Security Before, During, and After COVID-19.Andreas Papamichail - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):467-481.
    The COVID-19 pandemic has been shaped by preexisting political, social, and economic relations and governance structures, and will remold these structures going forward. This review essay considers three books on global health politics written by Simon Rushton, Clare Wenham, and Jeremy Youde. Here, I explore what these books collectively and individually can tell us about these preexisting dynamics, the events of the first eighteen months of the COVID-19 pandemic, and possible future directions in the politics of global health. I argue (...)
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  10. Reduced Legal Equality of Combatants in War.Philipp Gisbertz-Astolfi - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):443-465.
    The focus on the moral rights of combatants in the ethics of war ignores a very important point: although morally unjust combatants cannot be considered moral equals to just combatants, especially with regard to the right to kill, there are sound moral reasons why the laws of war should accept a kind of equality between them, a concept referred to as “reduced legal equality.” Reduced legal equality is not about equal moral rights but about granting legal immunity to combatants for (...)
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  11. Engines of Patriarchy: Ethical Artificial Intelligence in Times of Illiberal Backlash Politics.Hendrik Schopmans & Jelena Cupać - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):329-342.
    In recent years, concerns over the risks posed by artificial intelligence have mounted. In response, international organizations have begun to translate the emerging consensus on the need for ethical AI into concrete international rules and standards. While the path toward effective AI governance faces many challenges, this essay shifts attention to an obstacle that has received little attention so far: the growing illiberal backlash in IOs. Prompted by Poland's recent rejection of a European position on AI due to the document's (...)
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  12. War, Duties to Protect, and Military Abolitionism.Cécile Fabre - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):395-406.
    Just war theorists who argue that war is morally justified under certain circumstances infer implicitly that establishing the military institutions needed to wage war is also morally justified. In this paper, I mount a case in favor of a standing military establishment: to the extent that going to war is a way to discharge duties to protect fellow citizens and distant strangers from grievous harms, we have a duty to set up the institutions that enable us to discharge that duty. (...)
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  13. Introduction: Is a Military Really Worth Having?Peter Balint - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):343-352.
    Just war theory has traditionally focused on jus ad bellum and jus in bello. What has been neglected is the question of jus ante bellum, or justice before war. In particular: Under what circumstances is it justifiable for a polity to prepare for war by militarizing? When and why is it morally permissible or even obligatory to create and maintain the potential to wage war? What are the alternatives to the military? And if we do have militaries, how should they (...)
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  14. Are States Under a Prospective Duty to Create and Maintain Militaries?Ned Dobos - 2021 - Ethics and International Affairs 35 (3):407-419.
    Suppose it is foreseeable that you will soon encounter a drowning child, whom you will only be able to rescue if you learn to swim. In this scenario we might think that you have a “prospective duty” to take swimming lessons given that this will be necessary to perform the future rescue. Cécile Fabre argues that, by parity of reasoning, states have a prospective duty to build and maintain military establishments. My argument in this essay pulls in the opposite direction. (...)
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  15. Objectionable Commemorations, Historical Value, and Repudiatory Honouring.Ten-Herng Lai - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    Many have argued that certain statues or monuments are objectionable, and thus ought to be removed. Even if their arguments are compelling, a major obstacle is the apparent historical value of those commemorations. Preservation in some form seems to be the best way to respect the value of commemorations as connections to the past or opportunities to learn important historical lessons. Against this, I argue that we have exaggerated the historical value of objectionable commemorations. Sometimes commemorations connect to biased or (...)
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  16. Autonomy as Non‐Alienation, Autonomy as Sovereignty, and Politics.David Enoch - 2022 - Wiley: Journal of Political Philosophy 30 (2):143-165.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 143-165, June 2022.
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  17. The Problem of Public Shaming.Harrison Frye - 2022 - Journal of Political Philosophy 30 (2):188-208.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  18. The Metaphysics of Intersectionality Revisited.Holly Lawford-Smith & Kate Phelan - 2022 - Journal of Political Philosophy 30 (2):166-187.
    ‘Intersectionality’ is one of the rare pieces of academic jargon to make it out of the university and into the mainstream. The message is clear and well-known: your feminism had better be intersectional. But what exactly does this mean? This paper is partly an exercise in conceptual clarification, distinguishing at least six distinct types of claim found across the literature on intersectionality, and digging further into the most philosophically complex of these claims—namely the metaphysical and explanatory. It’s also partly a (...)
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  19. Why Limitarianism?Ingrid Robeyns - 2022 - Wiley: Journal of Political Philosophy 30 (2):249-270.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 249-270, June 2022.
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  20. The Right to Explanation.Kate Vredenburgh - 2022 - Wiley: Journal of Political Philosophy 30 (2):209-229.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 209-229, June 2022.
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  21. The Limits of Limitarianism.Robert Huseby - 2022 - Wiley: Journal of Political Philosophy 30 (2):230-248.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, Volume 30, Issue 2, Page 230-248, June 2022.
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  22. Moral Injury and Revisionist Just War Theory.Jesse Kirkpatrick - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):27-35.
    As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay explores the relationship between revisionist just war theory and moral injury. It proceeds in four sections. First, it offers a brief overview of the just war tradition, focusing on traditionalist and revisionist accounts, respectively. Next, it explores the relationship between moral injury and armed conflict. Then, it explores the links between moral injury and revisionist accounts of just war theory. Finally, by way of conclusion, the essay signals two (...)
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  23. The “Third” United Nations: How a Knowledge Ecology Helps the UN Think, Tatiana Carayannis and Thomas G. Weiss (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2021), 224 Pp., Cloth $85, eBook $84.99. [REVIEW]Michael J. Struett - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):111-114.
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  24. Moral Injury and the Lived Experience of Political Violence.Daniel Rothenberg - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):15-25.
    Moral injury names how the lived experience of armed conflict can damage an individual's ethical foundations, often with serious consequences. While the term has gained increasing acceptance for the clinical treatment of veterans and as a means of better understanding the impact of war, it is generally applied to individualized trauma. As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay argues that moral injury is also a useful means of addressing political violence at a societal level. It (...)
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  25. Identity and Shared Humanity: Reflections on Amartya Sen's Memoir.Deen Chatterjee - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):91-108.
    Amartya Sen's memoir, Home in the World, is a compelling read, giving a fascinating view of the making of the mind of one of the foremost public intellectuals of our time. In reflections on the first three decades of his life—all filled with an amazing range of experiences, encounters, and intellectual explorations that span Asia, Europe, and North America—Sen weaves a comprehensive and interlocking narrative that brings together a unitary worldview where two multi-dimensional themes are juxtaposed throughout the book: the (...)
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  26. Delta Democracy: Pathways to Incremental Civic Revolution in Egypt and Beyond, Catherine E. Herrold (New York: Oxford University Press, 2020), 224 Pp., Cloth $105, Paperback $31.95, eBook $21.99. [REVIEW]James Ketterer - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):114-117.
  27. The War Is Over but the Moral Pain Continues.David Wood - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):7-13.
    Almost five million Americans volunteered to serve in the U.S. armed forces between 2001 and 2021 and returned home as discharged veterans. Among them, 30,177 men and women have taken their own lives, an awful toll that is more than five times the number of Americans killed in combat in our twenty-first century wars. As part of the roundtable, “Moral Injury, Trauma, and War,” this essay argues that the reasons are many, but one major factor may be the moral pain (...)
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  28. Humane: How the United States Abandoned Peace and Reinvented War, Samuel Moyn (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2021), 416 Pp., Cloth $30, Paperback $20, eBook $14.99. [REVIEW]Mary L. Dudziak - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):109-111.
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  29. Should German Courts Prosecute Syrian International Crimes? Revisiting the “Dual Foundation” Thesis.Yuna Han - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):37-63.
    Should Germany be prosecuting crimes committed in Syria pursuant to universal jurisdiction? This article revisits the normative questions raised by UJ—the principle that a state can prosecute serious international crimes such as genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes committed by foreigners outside of its territories—against the backdrop of increasing European UJ proceedings regarding Syrian conflict–related crimes, focusing on Germany as an illustrative example. While existing literature justifies UJ on the basis of universal prohibition of certain atrocities, this creates residual (...)
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  30. The End Days of the Fourth Eelam War: Sri Lanka's Denialist Challenge to the Laws of War.Megan Price - 2022 - Ethics and International Affairs 36 (1):65-89.
    During the final months of Sri Lanka's 2006–2009 civil war, Sri Lankan armed forces engaged in a disproportionate and indiscriminate shelling campaign against the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, which culminated in the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians. Conventional wisdom suggests that Sri Lanka undermined international humanitarian law. Significantly, however, the Sri Lankan government did not directly challenge such law or attempt to justify its departure from it. Rather, it invented a new set of facts about its conduct (...)
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  31. A Buddhist Critique of Marx: Unveiling Flaws in ‘Desire,’ of a Near-Perfect Doctrine.Nishanathe Dahanayake - forthcoming - Philosophy of East West.
    Abstract There is a fundamental flaw at the heart of Karl Marx's approach to the alleviation of human suffering. That flaw lies in his commitment to a conception of the person – technically, the ego – that centres on desire-satisfaction, and, deepening the problem, does so in a way that underplays the centrality to all desire-satisfaction beyond that of the most elemental bodily desires, of that element Hegel termed “recognition.” Remedying this failure gives an understanding of desire and suffering that (...)
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  32. Revealing Invisible Inequalities in Egalitarian Political Theory.Leon Schlüter - forthcoming - Journal of Global Ethics:1-18.
    In this paper, I consider what one might call a negative-critical turn in egalitarian political theorizing, according to which egalitarians should not begin with a positive account of how a society...
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  33. Selling Arms and Expressing Harm.James Christensen - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 39 (1):6-22.
    According to an argument commonly made by politicians, selling weapons to oppressive and aggressive regimes can sometimes be permissible because the sale renders the victims of these regimes no worse off than they would have been had the sale not been made. We can refer to this argument as the inconsequence argument. My primary aim in this article is to identify one reason why the inconsequence argument will often not succeed in vindicating arms sales to oppressive and aggressive regimes. The (...)
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  34. A Defense of Pluralist Egalitarianism Under Severe Uncertainty: Axiomatic Characterization☆.Akira Inoue & Kaname Miyagishima - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  35. Global Poverty and Kantian Hope.Claudia Blöser - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-16.
    Development economists have suggested that the hopes of the poor are a relevant factor in overcoming poverty. I argue that Kant’s approach to hope provides an important complement to the economists’ perspective. A Kantian account of hope emphasizes the need for the rationality of hope and thereby guards against problematic aspects of the economists’ discourse on hope. Section 1 introduces recent work on hope in development economics. Section 2 clarifies Kant’s question “What may I hope?” and presents the outlines of (...)
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  36. Moral Grandstanding, Narcissism, and Self-Reported Responses to the COVID-19 Crisis.Joshua B. Grubbs, A. Shanti James, Brandon Warmke & Justin Tosi - 2022 - Journal of Research in Personality 97 (104187):1-10.
    The present study aimed to understand how status-oriented individual differences such as narcissistic antagonism, narcissistic extraversion, and moral grandstanding motivations may have longitudinally predicted both behavioral and social media responses during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic. Via YouGov, a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults was recruited in August of 2019 (N = 2,519; Mage = 47.5, SD = 17.8; 51.4% women) and resampled in May of 2020, (N = 1,533). Results indicated that baseline levels of narcissistic antagonism (...)
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  37. Virtù e Fortuna em Maquiavel a partir da obra 'O Príncipe'.Rubin Souza - 2014 - Jus Navigandi 1 (1):1-15.
    O trabalho busca esclarecer dois pontos centrais da Filosofia política de Maquiavel – as figuras da Virtù e da Fortuna. A virtú deve ser vista como uma forma do livre-arbítrio do governante, sendo a principal variável na condução do principado.Destaca-se, também, a utilização da variável nacontestação aos valorestradicionais. Já a Fortuna constitui-se na indeterminabilidade de parte dos resultadosdo governo: ela deve ser dominada, conquistada para o benefício do príncipe.
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  38. Trade Justice and the Least‐Developed Countries☆.Tadhg Ó Laoghaire & Thomas R. Wells - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  39. “Zionism as Holistic Idea: Mordecai M. Kaplan’s Pragmatic Approach” [in Hebrew].Nadav S. Berman - forthcoming - In Zion and Diaspora: Past, Present, Future, eds. Joseph Turner and Ari Ackerman. Jerusalem: Carmel.
    This forthcoming book-chapter investigates the pragmatist Zionist thought of Mordecai M. Kaplan, and considers its pluralistic and holistic traits, vis-a-vis monolithic and fundamentalist approaches to Zionism.
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  40. Regulation of Genetically Engineered (GE) Mosquitoes as a Public Health Tool: A Public Health Ethics Analysis.Zahra Meghani - 2022 - Globalization and Health 1 (18):1-14.
    In recent years, genetically engineered (GE) mosquitoes have been proposed as a public health measure against the high incidence of mosquito-borne diseases among the poor in regions of the global South. While uncertainties as well as risks for humans and ecosystems are entailed by the open-release of GE mosquitoes, a powerful global health governance non-state organization is funding the development of and advocating the use of those bio-technologies as public health tools. In August 2016, the US Food and Drug Agency (...)
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  41. Monismo e dualismo entre estado e direito: breves considerações acerca do conceito de estado de direito em Habermas.Rubin Souza - 2017 - Revista INQUIETUDE, GOIÂNIA 8 (2):34-50.
    Habermas frequentemente adota o termo Estado de direito na sua obra Direito e democracia: entre facticidade e validade. O objetivo deste artigo, então, consiste na investigação da possibilidade desse conceito, no seu fundamento e na apresentação dos problemas dele decorrentes, contrapondo-o especificamente a sua antítese, isto é, ao monismo entre Estado e direito de Kelsen. Ocorre que a filosofia habermasiana, conforme entendimento do artigo, implica a adoção de uma teoria dualista entre os conceitos de Estado e de direito. Observa-se, assim, (...)
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  42. Science is so Costly Because of Wars.Minh-Hoang Nguyen - manuscript
    Investment in science has led human civilization to many achievements in science and technology, including military weapons. War – the worst scenario of a conflict – always leads to deaths and devastation. Weapons do not destroy things and kill people by themselves, but they are used and controlled by the hands of humans. No matter how advanced they are, they are still tools that serve humans’ interests. Conflicts need to be resolved through humane approaches aided by science and technology developments. (...)
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  43. Applying the Capabilities Approach to Disability & Education.Christopher A. Riddle - 2021 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 2 (28):83-94.
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  44. Are Intuitions Treated as Evidence? Cases From Political Philosophy.Sebastian J. Conte - forthcoming - Journal of Political Philosophy.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  45. Pandemic as Revelation.Sridhar Venkatapuram - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):388-399.
    This essay identifies three insights about global equity and justice in light of the COVID pandemic. It discusses the need for greater recognition of the role of the global order in the distributio...
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  46. Build That Wall! Vaccine Certificates, Passes and Passports, the Distribution of Harms and Decolonial Global Health Justice.Gabriela Arguedas-Ramírez - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):375-387.
    The implementation of COVID-19 vaccine certificates or passports entails many difficult issues, both technical and ethical. Looking at the ethical issues from a decolonial approach to justice, it i...
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  47. The Waiver of COVID-19 Vaccine Patents: A Fairness-Based Approach.Eduardo A. Rueda-Barrera - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):367-374.
    Nowadays global inequalities in access to vaccines seem to be a growing problem. Intellectual Property Rights have been playing an important role both in causing and worsening them. Firstly,...
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  48. Intellectual Property Rights Trump the Right to Health: Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime and TRIPs Flexibilities in the Context of Bolivia’s Quest for Vaccines.James Crombie - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):353-366.
    The failure of the Canadian pharmaceutical company Biolyse Pharma to obtain authorization under Canada’s Access to Medicines Regime to produce 15 million badly needed doses of a generic copy...
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  49. Global Health and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Care Ethics Approach.Fiona Robinson - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):340-352.
    This paper presents a case for a feminist care ethics approach to thinking about ethics and justice in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Much of the existing commentary has been focused on arri...
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  50. Foreign Aid and Discourses of National Social Responsibility: Evidence From South Korea.Juliette Schwak - 2021 - Journal of Global Ethics 17 (3):302-322.
    This article analyses a recent discourse of responsibility that accompanies states’ foreign aid provision. States adopt this discourse of National Social Responsibility to show their complian...
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