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  1. Bodies of Knowledge: Diotima’s Reproductive Expertise in the Symposium.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2023 - In Megan Elena Bowen, Mary Hamil Gilbert & Edith Gwendolyn Nally (eds.), Believing Ancient Women: Feminist Epistemologies for Greece and Rome. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    This chapter uses feminist standpoint theory to investigate Diotima’s epistemic advantage in Plato’s Symposium. Scholars have wondered why Diotima – a woman speaking about the role of erōs in gestation, childbirth, and childrearing – voices the view that Plato privileges most among all the symposiasts (Halperin 1990, Evans 2006, Hobbs 2007). Feminist standpoint theory is useful in developing a novel answer to this question; it supposes that oppressed groups, because they occupy different social locations, often develop epistemic privileges over their (...)
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  2. Cancel Culture, Then and Now: A Platonic Approach to the Shaming of People and the Exclusion of Ideas.Douglas R. Campbell - 2023 - Journal of Cyberspace Studies 7 (2):147-166.
    In this article, I approach some phenomena seen predominantly on social-media sites that are grouped together as cancel culture with guidance from two major themes in Plato’s thought. In the first section, I argue that shame can play a constructive and valuable role in a person’s improvement, just as we see Socrates throughout Plato’s dialogues use shame to help his interlocutors improve. This insight can help us understand the value of shaming people online for, among other things, their morally reprehensible (...)
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  3. On Becoming Fearful Quickly: A Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Somatic Model of Socratean Akrasia.Brian Andrew Lightbody - 2023 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):134-161.
    The Protagoras is the touchstone of Socrates’ moral intellectualist stance. The position in a nutshell stipulates that the proper reevaluation of a desire is enough to neutralize it.[1] The implication of this position is that akrasia or weakness of will is not the result of desire (or fear for that matter) overpowering reason but is due to ignorance. -/- Socrates’ eliminativist position on weakness of will, however, flies in the face of the common-sense experience regarding akratic action and thus Aristotle (...)
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  4. On Reason and Hope: Plato, Pieper, and the Hopeful Structure of Reason.Ryan M. Brown - 2023 - Communio 50 (2):375-421.
    As Josef Pieper writes in his study “On Hope,” the virtue of hope is the virtue that completes the human being in its intermediary, temporal state (the “status viatoris,” or condition of being “on the way”). To be human is always to be “on the way” toward a fulfillment and completion not yet available to it (the “status comprehensoris”). Those who are hopeful direct themselves toward this end as to their fulfillment despite recognizing that it, in some sense, exceeds their (...)
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  5. The Liberation of Virtue in Plato's Phaedrus.Ryan M. Brown - 2022 - In Ryan M. Brown & Jay R. Elliott (eds.), _Arete_ in Plato and Aristotle. Sioux City: Parnassos Press. pp. 45-74.
    When thinking of Plato’s discussions of virtue, many dialogues come to mind, but, assuredly, the Phaedrus does not. The word ἀρετή is used only six times in the dialogue. Unlike other dialogues, the Phaedrus thematizes neither the general concept of virtue nor any of the particular virtues. Given the centrality of virtue to Plato’s ethics and politics, it is surprising to see little reference to virtue in a dialogue devoted to love and to rhetoric, topics that have deep ethical and (...)
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  6. Self-knowledge, Eros and Recollection in Plato's "Phaedrus".Athanasia Giasoumi - 2022 - Plato Journal 23:23-35.
    At the beginning of the "Phaedrus", Socrates distinguishes between two kinds of people: those who are more complex, violent and hybristic than the monster Typhon, and those who are simpler, calmer and tamer (230a). I argue that there are also two distinct types of Eros (Love) that correlate to Socrates’s two kinds of people. In the first case, lovers cannot attain recollection because their souls are disordered in the absence of self-knowledge. For the latter, the self-knowledge of self-disciplined lovers renders (...)
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  7. The Soul’s Tomb: Plato on the Body as the Cause of Psychic Disorders.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (1):119-139.
    I argue that, according to Plato, the body is the sole cause of psychic disorders. This view is expressed at Timaeus 86b in an ambiguous sentence that has been widely misunderstood by translators and commentators. The goal of this article is to offer a new understanding of Plato’s text and view. In the first section, I argue that although the body is the result of the gods’ best efforts, their sub-optimal materials meant that the soul is constantly vulnerable to the (...)
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  8. Philosophy at the Gym.Erik Kenyon - manuscript
    Ethical philosophy was born in the gyms of Athens. This book returns a body of abstract thought to its original context, to understand how training for the body sparked training for the mind. We will use archaeology to reconstruct the reality of ancient athletics and literary texts to critique philosophers’ idealized versions of this reality. We will explore a cluster of questions about the nature of happiness (eudaimonia), the role of human excellence (arete) in this life and what forms of (...)
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  9. Philosophy’s Workmate: Erōs and the Erōtica in Plato’s Symposium.Edith Gwendolyn Nally - 2022 - Apeiron 55 (3):329-357.
    Diotima’s speech claims that philosophy ranks among the erōtica. The standard reading of this holds that erōs manifests in philosophical activity. This is puzzling. Eros has a reputation for overpowering the psyche, making reasoning impossible. The major interpretive discussion of this puzzle suggests that Diotima must therefore accept either non-rationalist philosophizing or rationalist erōs. This paper argues for an alternative. The “ancillary activities view” posits that the erōtica do not manifest erōs but are activities undertaken to achieve its telos. On (...)
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  10. Socrates on the Emotions.Thomas C. Brickhouse & Nicholas D. Smith - 2015 - Plato Journal 15:9-28.
    In this paper we argue that Socrates is a cognitivist about emotions, but then ask how the beliefs that constitute emotions can come into being, and why those beliefs seem more resistant to change through rational persuasion than other beliefs.
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  11. Platonic Pity, or Why Compassion Is Not a Platonic Virtue.Rachana Kamtekar - 2020 - In Laura Candiotto & Olivier Renaut (eds.), Emotions in Plato. Boston: Brill. pp. 308–329.
    From Socrates’ claim in the Apology that a good person cannot be harmed to Plato’s characterizations of virtue as godlikeness in later dialogues like the Theaetetus and Timaeus, Platonic virtue seems to be an ideal of invulnerability. One might conclude that Plato would not count as virtues some of the qualities of character that we count as virtues, such as a compassionate disposition or disposition to pity, insofar as such qualities require their possessor to be vulnerable in ways that the (...)
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  12. Kent F. Moors: Glaucon and Adeimantus on Justice: the structure of argument in book 2 of Plato's Republic. Pp. x + 145. Washington, DC.: University Press of America, 1981. $20. [REVIEW]Julia Annas - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (2):283-284.
  13. Moral Virtue and Assimilation to God in Plato's Timaeus.Timothy A. Mahoney - 2005 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxviii: Summer 2005. Oxford University Press. pp. 77-91.
  14. Socrates on Why We Should Inquire.David Ebrey - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):1-17.
    This paper examines whether Socrates provides his interlocutors with good reasons to seek knowledge of what virtue is, reasons that they are in a position to appreciate. I argue that in the Laches he does provide such reasons, but they are not the reasons that are most commonly identified as Socratic. Socrates thinks his interlocutors should be motivated not by the idea that virtue is knowledge nor by the idea that knowledge is good for its own sake, but rather by (...)
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  15. Walter T. Schmid, "On Manly Courage: A Study of Plato's "Laches"". [REVIEW]David Roochnik - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (1):128.
  16. On Manly Courage. [REVIEW]Hugh H. Benson - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):383-386.
  17. Socrates at Work on Virtue and Knowledge in Platos "Charmides".Gerasimos Santas - 1973 - Phronesis 18:105.
  18. Goodness and Justice: Plato, Aristotle and the Moderns.R. F. Stalley - 2003 - Mind 112 (446):382-385.
  19. Nature, Knowledge and Virtue. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (1):84-85.
  20. Protagoras’ Defense of the Teachableness of Virtue.Tom Morris - 1991 - Southwest Philosophy Review 7 (2):47-65.
  21. Virtue as the Only Unconditional — But not Intrinsic — Good.Naomi Reshotko - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (2):325-334.
  22. Socrates’ Human Wisdom and Sophrosune in Charmides 164c ff.Gabriela Roxana Carone - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):267-286.
  23. Prudence and the Fear of Death in Plato’s Apology.Emily A. Austin - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):39-55.
  24. The Unity of Knowledge and Love in Socrates’ Conception of Virtue.Emile de Strycker - 1966 - International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (3):428-444.
  25. Euthyphro, Foucault, and Baseball.Harry Brod - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (3):249-258.
    The central question of the Euthyphro is “Is the pious loved by the gods because it is pious, or pious because it is loved?” A baseball analogy explains this to students: “Does the umpire say ‘Out’ because the runner is out, or is the runner out because the umpire says ‘Out’?” The former makes the relevant knowledge public, making Socrates the appropriate secular moral authority, while the latter makes it religious, invoking Euthyphro’s expertise. Foucault’s aphorism that power is knowledge illuminates (...)
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  26. Comments on Sarah Broadie “Virtue and beyond in Plato and Aristotle”.Rachel Barney - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (S1):115-125.
  27. Plato, Aristotle and Professor MacIntyre.Arthur Madigan - 1983 - Ancient Philosophy 3 (2):171-183.
  28. On the Ancient Idea that Music Shapes Character.James Harold - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (3):341-354.
    Ancient Chinese and Greek thinkers alike were preoccupied with the moral value of music; they distinguished between good and bad music by looking at the music’s effect on moral character. The idea can be understood in terms of two closely related questions. Does music have the power to affect the ethical character of either listener or performer? If it does, is it better as music for doing so? I argue that an affirmative answers to both questions are more plausible than (...)
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  29. Thrasymachus’ Sophistic Account of Justice in Republic i.Merrick E. Anderson - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):151-172.
    In this paper, I oppose the now-dominant view that Thrasymachus offers a definition of justice in Book I of the Republic. This way of interpretation Thrasymachus does not pay sufficient attention to the methodological assumptions he makes during his disagreement with Socrates. To better understand Socrates’ antagonist, it is crucial to remember that he was, in fact, a sophist. I argue that what the character Thrasymachus is doing in Book I is importantly akin to a certain genre of sophistic arguments (...)
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  30. “Wolf’s Justice”: The Iliadic Doloneia and the Semiotics of Wolves.D. Steiner - 2015 - Classical Antiquity 34 (2):335-369.
    This article treats representations of the wolf in the Greek archaic and early classical literary and visual sources. Using a close reading of the Iliadic Doloneia as a point of departure, it argues that wolves in myth, fable, and other modes of discourse, as well as in the early artistic tradition, regularly serve as a means of signaling the loss of distinctions that occurs when friend turns into foe and an erstwhile philos or “second self” betrays one of his kind. (...)
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  31. Thrasymachus's Justice.Shmuel Harlap - 1979 - Political Theory 7 (3):347-370.
  32. Plato's 'Laws': A Critical Guide.Christopher Bobonich (ed.) - 2010 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Long understudied, Plato's Laws has been the object of renewed attention in the past decade and is now considered to be his major work of political philosophy besides the Republic. In his last dialogue, Plato returns to the project of describing the foundation of a just city and sketches in considerable detail its constitution, laws and other social institutions. Written by leading Platonists, the essays in this volume cover a wide range of topics central for understanding the Laws, such as (...)
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  33. The Virtuous Life in Greek Ethics.Burkhard Reis & Stella Haffmans (eds.) - 2006 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    There is now a renewed concern for moral psychology among moral philosophers. Moreover, contemporary philosophers interested in virtue, moral responsibility and moral progress regularly refer to Plato and Aristotle, the two founding fathers of ancient ethics. The book contains eleven chapters by distinguished scholars which showcase current research in Greek ethics. Four deal with Plato, focusing on the Protagoras, Euthydemus, Symposium and Republic, and discussing matters of literary presentation alongside the philosophical content. The four chapters on Aristotle address problems such (...)
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  34. Evaluating the Goodness of Actions on Plato's Ethical Theory.Elizabeth Jelinek - 2015 - Philosophical Inquiry 39 (3-4):56-72.
    Can Plato’s ethical theory account for the goodness of actions? Plato’s Form of the Good is regarded as the ultimate explanatory principle of all good things, which presumably includes good actions. And this is indeed a standard view. However, in this paper I argue that the theory of the Form of the Good cannot explain the goodness of actions. This is a highly contested claim because, if it is accurate, it suggests that there is a significant deficit in Plato’s theory (...)
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  35. Plato or Justice.Edward Calvin Golumbic - 1961
  36. Die Entwicklungsstufen in Platos Tugendlehre.Maximilian Gerhard Michaelis - 1893
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  37. Before Theory and Practice: Implication of Desire and Knowledge in Plato's Dialogues.Colin Alexander Anderson - 2002 - Dissertation, Loyola University of Chicago
    In this dissertation, I re-examine the relationship between knowledge and virtue in Plato's dialogues. I argue that "knowledge" in the dialogues is not defined in opposition to "desire" but rather involves "desire" as a constitutive component and that "knowledge" has affective and "erotic" aspects. As a point of reference, I examine Aristotle's brief arguments against the Socratic identification of episteme and arete . I argue that they rest on epistemological and psychological assumptions that Socrates need not accept: viz., a differentiation (...)
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  38. Glaucon and Adeimantus on Justice: The Structure of Argument in Book 2 of Plato's Republic.Kent F. Moors - 1981
  39. The double life of justice and injustice in Thrasymachus' account.Robert Arp - 1999 - Polis 16 (1-2):17-29.
  40. Of Firemen, Sophists, and Hunter-Philosophers: Citizenship and Courage in Plato’s Laches.Richard Avramenko - 2007 - Polis 24 (2):203-230.
    The violence of the attacks on New York and Washington and the subsequent war in Iraq have brought to the fore the issue of citizenship virtue. This paper challenges nearly a generation of citizenship theorists who, by privileging discourse over other virtues, have impaired the capacity for a balanced political response to this event. It is argued that the removal of the virtue of courage from the model of good citizenship has resulted in a politics that either cannot suffer violence (...)
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  41. Justice in Plato's Republic. [REVIEW]F. D. J. - 1958 - Review of Metaphysics 11 (3):514-514.
    A desultory caricature, ostensibly socialist in tenor, of a well-known theory of justice.--J. F. D.
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  42. Kamtekar Virtue and Happiness. Essays in Honour of Julia Annas. Pp. x + 351. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. Paper, £22.50 . ISBN: 978-0-19-964605-0. [REVIEW]Vanessa de Harven - 2014 - The Classical Review 64 (1):71-73.
    Contains essays on topics in moral philosophy from Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism and Plotinus. See the review at NDPR for detailed descriptions http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/virtue-and-happiness-essays-in-honour-of-julia-annas/.
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  43. Comic Cure for Delusional Democracy: Plato's Republic.Gene Fendt - 2014 - Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
    In this book, author Gene Fendt shows how Plato's Republic provides a liturgical purification for the political and psychic delusions of democratic readers, even as Socrates provides the same for his interlocutors at the festival of Bendis. Each of the several characters is analyzed in accord with Book Eight's 6 geometrically possible kinds of character showing how their answers and failures in the dialogue exhibit the particular kind of movement and blindness predictable for the type.
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  44. Terry Penner and Richard Kraut, eds., Nature, Knowledge and Virtue: Essays in Memory of Joan Kung Reviewed by.Marguerite Deslauriers - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (5):353-355.
  45. Knowledge, Stability, and Virtue in the Meno.Casey Perin - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):15-34.
  46. Sovereign Virtue. [REVIEW]C. C. W. Taylor - 1995 - Ancient Philosophy 15 (1):228-232.
  47. Piety as a Virtue in the Euthyphro.Russell E. Jones - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):385-390.
  48. Plato's Anti-Hedonism and the "Protagoras".J. Clerk Shaw - 2015 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
    This book takes on two main tasks. The first is to argue that anti-hedonism lies at the center of Plato's critical project in both ethics and politics. Plato sees pleasure and pain as our sole sources of empirical evidence about good and bad. But as sources of evidence they are highly fallible; contrast effects with pain intensify certain pleasures, including most pleasures related to the body and social standing. This leads us to believe that the causes of such pleasures (e.g. (...)
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  49. Contemplation and self-mastery in Plato's Phaedrus.Suzanne Obdrzalek - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:77-107.
    This chapter examines Plato's moral psychology in the Phaedrus. It argues against interpreters such as Burnyeat and Nussbaum that Plato's treatment of the soul is increasingly pessimistic: reason's desire to contemplate is at odds with its obligation to rule the soul, and psychic harmony can only be secured by violently suppressing the lower parts of the soul.
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  50. Lust und Arete bei Platon.Lynn Huestegge - 2004 - Hildesheim: G. Olms.
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