This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related

Contents
1710 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 1710
Material to categorize
  1. Revisiting the Aged-based Educational Ideas of Plato.Hamidur Rahman - 2023 - International Journal of Arts and Humanities Studies 3 (3):01-07.
    Education is crucial to the overall development of all communities. Since the early days of Greek philosophy, philosophers have made significant contributions to the advancement of education for both individuals and the states. Greek philosophers, notably Plato, emphasized the importance and relevance of education for his conceptual ideal state. His educational ideas were rooted in his philosophy, notably idealism, and it continues to have a great effect, particularly on education. Idealism focuses on ideas and believes that genuine knowledge can be (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Једно и мноштво у Платоновој психологији.Александар Ристески - 2020 - In Оливера Марковић Савић & Неџиб Прашевић (eds.), Наука без граница III, 5, Друштво у огледалу науке. pp. 155–170.
    In this paper the author will assess Plato’s tripartite psychology in the light of his metaphysical account of μέγιστα γένη and One and Many, in order to further clarify the structure of his “dualism”. By doing so, the author will try to show that the tripartition is not a metaphysical conundrum of Plato’s thought and that it cannot be read in the light of Cartesian substance dualism, which is a noticeable approach in contemporary discussions. Aside of that, Plato and Descartes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. On Reason and Hope: Plato, Pieper, and the Hopeful Structure of Reason.Ryan M. Brown - 2023 - Communio 50 (2):375-421.
    As Josef Pieper writes in his study “On Hope,” the virtue of hope is the virtue that completes the human being in its intermediary, temporal state (the “status viatoris,” or condition of being “on the way”). To be human is always to be “on the way” toward a fulfillment and completion not yet available to it (the “status comprehensoris”). Those who are hopeful direct themselves toward this end as to their fulfillment despite recognizing that it, in some sense, exceeds their (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Conocer, hablar y nombrar según Platón: una lectura cruzada del Fedro y del Crátilo.Jonathan Lavilla deLera & Daniel Salgueiro Martín - 2023 - Alpha (Osorno) 56:142-163.
    El presente artículo contiene una lectura cruzada del Fedro y el Crátilo en la que se aclaran algunos de sus ejes temáticos centrales con el fin de sacar a relucir las constantes del pensamiento platónico que ambos diálogos comparten. La descripción de la dialéctica presente en el Fedro encaja con una definición socrática del Crátilo que explicita que el nombre es un instrumento al servicio del dialéctico. Todo ello nos lleva a concluir que la técnica dialéctica, además de constituir el (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Divine Epiphany and Political Authority in Plato's Republic.Avshalom M. Schwartz - 2023 - History of Political Thought 44 (2):213-233.
    This article offers a new interpretation of the second ‘theological’ pattern in Plato’s Republic. Situating Plato within his religious context, it argues that this pattern calls into question the traditional ancient model of divine epiphany. Divine epiphany was a central element in Greek religion. Yet, in the absence of a centralized religious organization, this model threatened the philosophers’ authoritative position. Plato’s second pattern seeks not only to undermine this potential threat but also to pave the way towards a new, philosophicalmodel (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Review of J. Moss, Plato’s Epistemology: Being and Seeming. [REVIEW]Roberto Granieri - 2021 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review.
  7. Soul-Leading in Plato's Phaedrus and the Iconic Character of Being.Ryan M. Brown - 2021 - Dissertation, Boston College
    Since antiquity, scholars have observed a structural tension within Plato’s Phaedrus. The dialogue demands order in every linguistic composition, yet it presents itself as a disordered composition. Accordingly, one of the key problems of the Phaedrus is determining which—if any—aspect of the dialogue can supply a unifying thread for the dialogue’s major themes (love, rhetoric, writing, myth, philosophy, etc.). My dissertation argues that “soul-leading” (psuchagōgia)—a rare and ambiguous term used to define the innate power of words—resolves the dialogue’s structural tension. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Phaedo's Final Argument and the Soul's Kinship with the Divine.David Ebrey - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 61:25-62.
    In the Phaedo, Socrates leads us to expect that his final argument will address the details of Cebes’ cloakmaker objection. Nonetheless, almost all commentators treat the final argument as unconnected to these details. This paper argues that close attention to Cebes’ objection, Socrates’ restatement of it, and Socrates’ final argument shows that the final argument does offer a detailed response. According to the objection, the soul suffers as it brings life to the body, which ultimately leads to its destruction. Socrates (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. What about Plurality? Aristotle’s Discussion of Zeno’s Paradoxes.Barbara M. Sattler - 2021 - Peitho 12 (1):85-106.
    While Aristotle provides the crucial testimonies for the paradoxes of motion, topos, and the falling millet seed, surprisingly he shows almost no interest in the paradoxes of plurality. For Plato, by contrast, the plurality paradoxes seem to be the central paradoxes of Zeno and Simplicius is our primary source for those. This paper investigates why the plurality paradoxes are not examined by Aristotle and argues that a close look at the context in which Aristotle discusses Zeno holds the answer to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Unfolding Account of Forms in the Phaedo.David Ebrey - 2022 - In David Ebrey & Richard Kraut (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 268-297.
    In Plato’s dialogues, Socrates calls things like justice, piety, and largeness “forms.” In several of these dialogues, he makes clear that forms are very different from familiar objects like tables and trees. Why, exactly, does he think that they differ and how are they supposed to do so? This chapter argues that in the Phaedo Socrates does not assume that they are different, but rather, over five stages of the dialogue, provides an account of how and why they do so. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Located in Space: Plato’s Theory of Psychic Motion.Douglas R. Campbell - 2022 - Ancient Philosophy 42 (2):419-442.
    I argue that Plato thinks that the soul has location, surface, depth, and extension, and that the Timaeus’ composition of the soul out of eight circles is intended literally. A novel contribution is the development of an account of corporeality that denies the entailment that the soul is corporeal. I conclude by examining Aristotle’s objection to the Timaeus’ psychology and then the intellectual history of this reading of Plato.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Plato's The Allegory of the Cave.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    The main idea of this allegory is the difference between people who simply experience their sensory experiences, and call that knowledge, and those who understand real knowledge by seeing the truth. The allegory actually digs into some deep philosophy, which is not surprising since it comes from Plato. Its main idea is the discussion of how humans perceive reality and if human existence has a higher truth. It explores the theme of belief versus knowledge. The Perception Plato theorizes that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Platon’da Bilgi, Öğrenme ve Ruhun Ölümsüzlüğü.Soner Soysal - 2022 - İzmir, Turkey: Serüven Yayınevi.
  14. The Epistemic Competence of the Philosopher-Rulers in Plato's Republic.S. O. Peprah - 2021 - Eirene: Studia Graeca Et Latina 57 (I-II):119-147.
    It is widely accepted that ruling is the sole prerogative of Plato’s philosopher-rulers because they alone possess knowledge (ἐπιστήμη). This knowledge is knowledge of the Good, taken to be the only knowledge there is in Kallipolis. Let us call this the sufficiency condition thesis (the SCT). In this paper, I challenge this consensus. I cast doubt on the adequacy of the SCT, arguing that part of the training and education of the philosopher-rulers involves their gaining practical wisdom (φρόνησις) and experience (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Before the Creation of Time in Plato’s Timaeus.Daniel Vázquez - 2022 - In Daniel Vázquez & Alberto Ross (eds.), Time and Cosmology in Plato and the Platonic Tradition. pp. 111–133.
    I defend, against its more recent critics, a literal, factual, and consistent interpretation of Timaeus’ creation of the cosmos and time. My main purpose is to clarify the assumptions under which a literal interpretation of Timaeus’ cosmology becomes philosophically attractive. I propose five exegetical principles that guide my interpretation. Unlike previous literalists, I argue that assuming a “pre-cosmic time” is a mistake. Instead, I challenge the exegetical assumptions scholars impose on the text and argue that for Timaeus, a mere succession (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. PLATON’DA TANRI VE EVRENİN OLUŞUMU.Gamze Kaynak - 2018 - Dissertation, Süleyman Demi̇rel Üni̇versi̇tesi̇
    Main purpose of this work is to state the ideas of Plato about God, the universe, and the creation of universe. While explaining about his ideas on this subject, not only his time, but also ideas of the philosophers preceding him are taken into consideration. It also includes usual views and belief systems about the God, the universe and the creation of universe during his time. Thus, we had a chance to examine Plato’s ideas about our subject in detail. Our (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Platon’da Tanrı ve Evrenin Oluşumu.Gamze Kaynak - 2018 - Dissertation, Süleyman Demirel Üniversitesi
    Bu çalışmanın amacı Platon'un Tanrı, evren ve evrenin oluşumu konusundaki düşüncelerini ortaya koymaktır. Onun konu hakkındaki düşünceleri ortaya konulurken yalnızca kendi dönemi değil, kendisinden önceki düşünürlerin de felsefeleri dikkate alınmıştır. Bunun yanında dönemin genel Tanrı, evren ve evrenin oluşumu konusundaki kabulleri ve inanışları da dikkate alınmıştır. Böylelikle Platon'un konumuz ile ilgili olan düşünceleri ayrıntılı olarak incelenme imkânına kavuşmuştur. Literatür okuması yöntemiyle oluşturulan çalışmamız Platon öncesi ve Platon düşüncesini ayrı ayrı kategorilerde ele almış ve her bir bölümü kendi içerisinde Tanrı, evren (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. PLATON’DA TANRI VE EVRENİN OLUŞUMU.Gamze Kaynak - 2018 - Dissertation, Süleyman Demi̇rel Üni̇versi̇tesi̇
    Main purpose of this work is to state the ideas of Plato about God, the universe, and the creation of universe. While explaining about his ideas on this subject, not only his time, but also ideas of the philosophers preceding him are taken into consideration. It also includes usual views and belief systems about the God, the universe and the creation of universe during his time. Thus, we had a chance to examine Plato’s ideas about our subject in detail. Our (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Getting Younger.Daniel Vázquez - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):84-95.
    I argue that in Plato’s Parmenides 141a6–c4, things in time come to be simultaneously older and younger than themselves because a thing’s past and present selves are both real. As a result, whatever temporal relation is predicated of any of these past and present selves is true of the thing in question. Unlike other interpretations, this reading neither assumes that things in time have to replace their parts, nor that time is circular. I conclude that the passage is committed to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Bodily Desires and Afterlife Punishment in the 'Phaedo'.Doug Reed - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 59:45-78.
    In this paper I investigate whether in the 'Phaedo' the body or the soul is the subject of bodily desires. By analyzing Plato’s portrayal of the disembodied soul in the dialogue, I argue that because many souls are shown possessing bodily desires after death, the soul can possess bodily desires. Part of my analysis is built on my argument that the best way to understand afterlife punishment in the dialogue is as the necessary frustration of persistent bodily desires. Finally, I (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Ancient.Phil Corkum - 2020 - In Michael J. Raven (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Metaphysical Grounding. New York: pp. 20-32.
    Is there grounding in ancient philosophy? To ask a related but different question: is grounding a useful tool for the scholar of ancient philosophy? These questions are difficult, and my goal in this paper is not so much to give definitive answers as to clarify the questions. I hope to direct the student of contemporary metaphysics towards passages where it may be fruitful to look for historical precedent. But I also hope to offer the student of ancient philosophy some guidance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. L’ontologie du plaisir dans le Philèbe et le vocabulaire platonicien de l'être.Roberto Granieri - 2021 - Philosophie Antique 21:179-203.
    Dans cet article on se propose d’examiner les fondements ontologiques de l’argument anti-hédoniste de Philèbe 53c4-55a1. On soutiendra que l’usage des notions de γένεσις et οὐσία dans cet argument ne montre ni un abandon de la thèse de l’opposition du sensible à l’intelligible, ni, pour autant, une application mécanique de cette thèse. On souhaite montrer, en revanche, que ces notions jouissent d’une relativité sémantique telle que leurs significations varient en fonction des contextes argumentatifs, dont le passage retenu du Philèbe est (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Xenocrates and the Two-Category Scheme.Roberto Granieri - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (3):261-285.
    Simplicius reports that Xenocrates and Andronicus reproached Aristotle for positing an excessive number of categories, which can conveniently be reduced to two: τὰ καθ᾽αὑτά and τὰ πρός τι. Simplicius, followed by several modern commentators, interprets this move as being equivalent to a division into substance and accidents. I aim to show that, as far as Xenocrates is concerned, this interpretation is untenable and that the substance-accidents contrast cannot be equivalent to Xenocrates’ per se-relative one. Rather, Xenocrates aimed to stress the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy, vol. 36.S. J. Gurtler & Daniel P. Maher (eds.) - 2021 - Brill.
    Volume 36 contains papers and commentaries presented to the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy during academic year 2019-20. Works: _Republic 7, Topics 1.2, Nicomachean Ethics 3.5, Isis and Osiris_. Topics: types of dialectic, political philosophy, voluntary, hermeneutical retrieval, wanted emotions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Division and Proto-Racialism in the Statesman.John Proios - 2022 - In Matthew Clemente, Bryan J. Cocchiara & William J. Hendel (eds.), misReading Plato: Continental and Psychoanalytic Glimpses Beyond the Mask. New York: Routledge Publishing. pp. 188-201.
    In Plato’s Statesman, the Eleatic Stranger applies a specialized method of inquiry—the “method of collection and division”, or “method of division”—in order to discover the nature of statecraft. This paper articulates some consequences of the fact that the method is both a tool for identifying natural kinds—that is, a tool for carving the world by its joints (Phaedrus 265b-d)—and social kinds—that is, the kinds depending on human beings for their existence and explanation. A central goal of the paper is to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2002 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    The book "Theory of Forms: The Construction of Plato and Aristotle’s Criticism" focuses on two main aspects, construction and criticism. The constriction of Forms theory is the basis on which Plato built all of his philosophy and which influenced all forms of ideas philosophy that emerged after Plato. The research topic was completed by adding Aristotle's critique of the theory of Forms in order to put a clear picture in front of the reader, which was presented by Plato himself and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The philosopher’s Reward: Contemplation and Immortality in Plato’s Dialogues.Suzanne Obdrzalek - forthcoming - In Alex Long (ed.), Immortality in Ancient Philosophy.
    In dialogues ranging from the Symposium to the Timaeus, Plato appears to propose that the philosopher’s grasp of the forms may confer immortality upon him. Whatever can Plato mean in making such a claim? What does he take immortality to consist in, such that it could constitute a reward for philosophical enlightenment? And how is this proposal compatible with Plato’s insistence throughout his corpus that all soul, not just philosophical soul, is immortal? In this chapter, I pursue these questions by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Plato's Phaedrus after Descartes' Passions: Reviving Reason's Political Force.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - Lo Sguardo. Rivista di Filosofia 27:75-93.
    For this special issue, dedicated to the historical break in what one might call ‘the politics of feeling’ between ancient ‘passions’ (in the ‘soul’) and modern ‘emotions’ (in the ‘mind’), I will suggest that the pivotal difference might be located instead between ancient and modern conceptions of the passions. Through new interpretations of two exemplars of these conceptions, Plato’s Phaedrus and Descartes’ Passions of the Soul, I will suggest that our politics today need to return to what I term Plato’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Normativity in Plato’s Philebus.Jeffrey J. Fisher - 2020 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 50 (8):966-980.
    This paper extracts and articulates the account of normativity in Plato’s Philebus. Central to this account is the concept of measure, which plays both an ontological and a normative role. With regard to the former, measure is what makes particular things to be the specific kind of thing they are; with regard to the latter, measure supplies the appropriate standard for determining whether or not those things are good or bad instances of their kind. As a result of measure playing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Review of: Jorgenson, Chad, The Embodied Soul in Plato’s Later Thought (Cambridge Classical Studies), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 2018. [REVIEW]Rafael Ferber - 2020 - Augustiniana 70:407-410.
    This review tries to show that even if Plato ties the soul in the later dialogues more to the body, he still adheres in the Timaeus to the separation of the soul from the body as far as it is possible for humans, and in the Laws to the soul as a separated entity whose union with the body is in no way better than separation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. What is Beauty? A Multidisciplinary Approach to Aesthetic Experience.Martino Rossi Monti & Davor Pećnjak (eds.) - 2020 - Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    From Physical World to Transcendent God(s): Mediatory Functions of Beauty in Plato, Dante and Rupa Gosvami -/- Dragana Jagušić -/- In various philosophical, religious and mystical traditions, beauty is often related to intellectual upliftment and spiritual ascent, which suggests that besides its common aesthetic value it may also acquire an epistemic, metaphysical and spiritual meaning or value. I will examine in detail three accounts in which beauty, at times inseparable from desire and love, mediates between physical, intellectual and spiritual levels (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Riddle of the Early Academy.Richard Robinson & Harold Cherniss - 1947 - American Journal of Philology 68 (3):325.
  33. Plato, Pindar, and Metempsychosis.R. S. Bluck - 1958 - American Journal of Philology 79 (4):405.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Phaedrus and Reincarnation.R. S. Bluck - 1958 - American Journal of Philology 79 (2):156.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. Up and down in Plato's Logic.Richard Robinson - 1963 - American Journal of Philology 84 (3):300.
  36. Plato's Thought in the Making. A Study of the Development of His Metaphysics.Harry Neumann & J. E. Raven - 1968 - American Journal of Philology 89 (2):234.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Review of Quarch (1998): Sein und Seele: Platons Ideenphilosophie als Metaphysik der Lebendig-keit. Interpretationen zu und. [REVIEW]Arne Malmsheimer - 1999 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 4 (1):251-257.
  38. How Plato and Hegel Integrate the Sciences, the Arts, Religion, and Philosophy.Robert M. Wallace - 2019 - Hegel Jahrbuch 2019 (1):391-402.
  39. Becoming Socrates: Political Philosophy in Plato’s Parmenides, written by Alex Priou. [REVIEW]Darren Gardner - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):364-367.
  40. El Laques y la búsqueda de lo común.Renzo Roncagliolo Jones - 2000 - Estudios de Filosofía (Universidad de Antioquia) 4:15-23.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Il dolore, la speranza, il paradosso. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1987 - Il Mulino 36 (5):837-842.
    The malaise of modernity, in particular the malaise diagnosed by Nietzsche in the face of the absurdity of suffering, stems from an unfinished, dogmatic and contradictory revival of elements that medieval synthesis had marginalised: hope and earthliness. The ideologies of modernity - revolutionary-progressive or technical - were condemned to be ideologies, and therefore dogmatic, because they were based on faiths smuggled as reasons. Today we live a moment of awareness of the unfinished character of scientific discourses and the partial and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Plato’s Method of Hypothesis in the Middle Dialogues, written by Samuel Scolnicov.José Lourenço - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):75-77.
  43. Psychology and Ontology in Plato, edited by Pitteloud, L. and E. Keeling.Øyvind Rabbås - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):69-71.
  44. Opining Beauty Itself in Republic V.Naomi Reshotko - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):5-22.
    In consoling the lover of sights and sounds at Republic 475e4-479d5, Socrates describes a tripartite distinction among knowledge, doxa, and ignorance. Socrates claims that knowledge is ‘over’ what-is, doxa is over what is and is-not, and ignorance is over nothing at all. I argue that Plato shows that doxa and ignorance are also related to what-is. While knowledge, doxa, and ignorance interact with different first-degree objects, these three capacities have a common second-degree object: what-is. The fact that Socrates claims that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. Becoming Socrates: Political Philosophy in Plato’s Parmenides, written by Priou, Alex. [REVIEW]Eric Sanday - 2020 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 14 (1):65-68.
  46. Knowing the Whole: Comments on Gill, “Plato’s Phaedrus and the Method of Hippocrates”.Eric Brown - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (4):315-323.
    Socrates suggests that no one can know the nature of soul without knowing the nature of the whole. The whole what? Gill proposes "the whole environment" in which the soul is active. I criticize this and argue for the old-fashioned reading of "the whole world.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed.David Ebrey & Richard Kraut (eds.) - 2022 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Contributors in the order of contributions: David Ebrey, Richard Kraut, T. H. Irwin, Leonard Brandwood, Eric Brown, Agnes Callard, Gail Fine, Suzanne Obdrzalek, Gábor Betegh, Elizabeth Asmis, Henry Mendell, Constance C. Meinwald, Michael Frede, Emily Fletcher, Verity Harte, Rachana Kamtekar, and Rachel Singpurwalla. -/- The first edition of the Cambridge Companion to Plato (1992), edited by Richard Kraut, shaped scholarly research and guided new students for thirty years. This new edition introduces students to fresh approaches to Platonic dialogues while advancing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Cosmic Purpose of Natural Disasters in Plato’s Laws.George Harvey - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):157-177.
  49. Plato and Inherited Punishment.Anthony Natoli - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):135-156.
  50. Plato and the Invention of Life, by Michael Naas. [REVIEW]Will Barnes - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):469-473.
1 — 50 / 1710