This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

27 found
Order:
  1. Perfect Change in Plato's Sophist.Tushar Irani - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy.
    This paper examines how Plato’s rejection of the friends of the forms at 248a–249b in the Sophist is continuous with the arguments that he develops shortly after this part of the dialogue for the interrelatedness of the forms. I claim that the interrelatedness of the forms implies that they are changed, and that this explains Plato’s rejection of the friends of the forms. Much here turns on the kind of change that Plato wants to attribute to the forms. I distinguish (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Cosmos in the Ancient World.Phillip Sidney Horky (ed.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the ancient Greeks and Romans conceptualise order? This book answers that question by analysing the formative concept of kosmos in ancient literature, philosophy, science, art, and religion. This concept encouraged the Greeks and Romans to develop theories to explain core aspects of human life, including nature, beauty, society, politics, the individual, and what lies beyond human experience. Hence, Greek kosmos, and its Latin correlate mundus, are subjects of profound reflection by a wide range of important ancient figures, including (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Argument Against the Friends of the Forms Revisited: Sophist 248a4–249d5.Michael Wiitala - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (2):171-200.
    There are only two places in which Plato explicitly offers a critique of the sort of theory of forms presented in the Phaedo and Republic: at the beginning of the Parmenides and in the argument against the Friends of the Forms in the Sophist. An accurate account of the argument against the Friends, therefore, is crucial to a proper understanding of Plato’s metaphysics. How the argument against the Friends ought to be construed and what it aims to accomplish, however, are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. The Emerging Good in Plato's Philebus.John V. Garner - 2017 - Evanston, IL, USA: Northwestern University Press.
    This study examines Plato's dialogue on the good life and argues, most centrally, that the "pleasures of learning" exemplify, for Socrates, the possibility of good becoming or change.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. The Ontology of the Secret Doctrine in Plato’s Theaetetus.Christopher Buckels - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (3):243-259.
    The paper offers an interpretation of a disputed portion of Plato’s Theaetetus that is often called the Secret Doctrine. It is presented as a process ontology that takes two types of processes, swift and slow motions, as fundamental building blocks for ordinary material objects. Slow motions are powers which, when realized, generate swift motions, which, in turn, are subjectively bundled to compose sensible objects and perceivers. Although the reading of the Secret Doctrine offered here—a new version of the “Causal Theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Motion and Rest as Genuinely Greatest Kinds in the Sophist.Christopher Buckels - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):317-327.
    The paper argues that Motion and Rest are “greatest kinds” and not just convenient examples, since they are all-pervading. Thus Motion and Rest can be jointly predicated of a single subject and can be predicated of each other, just as Sameness and Otherness can. While Sameness and Otherness are opposites, a single subject may be the same in one respect, namely, the same as itself, and other in another respect, namely, other than other things. Thus they can be predicated of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Physical Change in Plato's Timaeus.Brian D. Prince - 2013 - Apeiron:1-19.
    In this paper I ask how Timaeus explains change within the trianglebased part of his cosmos. Two common views are that change among physical items is somehow caused or enabled by either the forms or the demiurge. I argue for a competing view, on which the physical items are capable of bringing about change by themselves, prior to the intervention of the demiurge, and prior to their being turned into imitations of the forms. I outline three problems for the view (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  8. Restless Forms and Changeless Causes.Fiona Leigh - 2012 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (2pt2):239-261.
    It is widely held that in Plato's Sophist, Forms rest or change or both. The received opinion is, however, false—or so I will argue. There is no direct support for it in the text and several passages tell against it. I will further argue that, contrary to the view of some scholars, Plato did not in this dialogue advocate a kind of change recognizable as 'Cambridge change', as applicable to his Forms. The reason that Forms neither change nor rest is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Unity and Development in Plato's Metaphysics.William Prior - 2012 - Routledge.
    Studies of Plato’s metaphysics have tended to emphasise either the radical change between the early Theory of Forms and the late doctrines of the Timaeus and the Sophist, or to insist on a unity of approach that is unchanged throughout Plato’s career. The author lays out an alternative approach. Focussing on two metaphysical doctrines of central importance to Plato’s thought – the Theory of Forms and the doctrine of Being and Becoming – he suggests a continuous progress can be traced (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  10. Nature and Divinity in Plato's Timaeus.Sarah Broadie - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Plato's Timaeus is one of the most influential and challenging works of ancient philosophy to have come down to us. Sarah Broadie's rich and compelling study proposes new interpretations of major elements of the Timaeus, including the separate Demiurge, the cosmic 'beginning', the 'second mixing', the Receptacle and the Atlantis story. Broadie shows how Plato deploys the mythic themes of the Timaeus to convey fundamental philosophical insights and examines the profoundly differing methods of interpretation which have been brought to bear (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  11. A Time for Learning and for Counting – Egyptians, Greeks and Empirical Processes in Plato’s Timaeus.Barbara M. Sattler - 2010 - In Richard Mohr & Barbara M. Sattler (eds.), One Book, the Whole Universe: Plato’s Timaeus Today. Parmenides Press. pp. 249-266.
    This paper argues that processes in the sensible realm can be in accord with reason in the Timaeus, since rationality is understood here as being based on regularity, which is conferred onto processes by time. Plato uses two different temporal structures in the Timaeus, associated with the contrast there drawn between Greek and Egyptian approaches to history. The linear order of before and after marks natural processes as rational and underlies the Greek treatment of history. By contrast, a bidirectional temporal (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Heraclitean Flux and Unity of Opposites in Plato's Theaetetus and Cratylus.Matthew Colvin - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (2):759-769.
    Heraclitean flux plays a large role in Plato 's « Theaetetus » and « Cratylus ». Yet Heraclitus himself did not hold the same conception of flux. The question of how the two thinkers differ, and why Plato treats Heraclitus as he does, is significant because the notion of flux has figured in subsequent philosophical conceptions of the persistence of identity through change. Comparison of Heraclitus, frr. B 12 and B 125 DK reveals that flux is not motion simply, but (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. À quelles conditions peut-on parler de « matière » dans le Timée de Platon ?Luc Brisson - 2003 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 1 (1):5-21.
    Dans le Timée, l'hypothèse de la khó̱ra, qu'il faut se garder d'identifier avec la húle̱ aristotélicienne, permet de rendre compte du fait que les choses sensibles sont radicalement différentes de leur modèle intelligible. Or, la constitution mathématique des éléments à partir de la khó̱ra mène à la contradiction suivante : dans l'univers platonicien, il faut tenir compte à la fois du continu qui doit caractériser la khó̱ra, et du discontinu qu'instaurent inéluctablement les polyèdres réguliers auxquels sont associés les éléments. La (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Mary Margaret McCabe. Plato's Individuals. [REVIEW]Scott Berman - 1996 - Modern Schoolman 73 (4):356-359.
  15. Plato’s Theory of Change: A Popperian Reconstruction and Its Significance For Traditional and Emerging Democracies.Joseph Osei - 1994 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):39-48.
    Abstract ‘PLATO’S THEORY OF CHANGE: A POPPERIAN RECONSTRUCTION AND ITS SIGNIFICANCE FOR TRADITIONAL AND EMERGING DEMOCRACIES,’ The International Journal of Applied Philosophy, Vol 8 Winter/Spring 1994, No.2. -/- This paper argues that in the midst of the unprecedented actual and potential socio-political and economic changes and transformations in our world toward the end of the 20th Century, the need for some philosophical grounding and guidance has become an imperative if only to avoid a global disaster or change for its own (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Heracleitean Flux in Plato's "Theaetetus".Naomi Reshotko - 1994 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 11 (2):139 - 161.
  17. Forms and Causes in Plato's Phaedo.Christopher Byrne - 1989 - Dionysius 13:3-15.
    Gregory Vlastos has argued that Aristotle and other commentators on the Phaedo have mistakenly interpreted Plato’s Forms to be efficient causes. While Vlastos is correct that the Forms by themselves are not efficient causes, because of his neo-Kantianism he has misunderstood the close connection between the Forms and the explanation of change, including teleological change. This paper explores the connection in Plato’s Phaedo between the Forms, the nature of change, and efficient causality, and argues that Aristotle’s remarks are not as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Matter and Flux in Plato's Timaeus.Mary Louise Gill - 1987 - Phronesis 32 (1):34-53.
  19. Plato on the Unknowability of the Sensible World.Richard J. Ketchum - 1987 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (3):291 - 305.
  20. Plato's Theory of Stuffs.Nicholas Denyer - 1983 - Philosophy 58 (225):315 - 327.
    The theory of forms makes a very poor theory of universals. It-or at least the "phaedo's" version of it-makes excellent sense as a theory of the elemental stuffs from which everything is made. This is shown by a detailed examination of all that this "phaedo" has to say about forms.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  21. Plato on Change and Time in the Parmenides.David Bostock - 1978 - Phronesis 23 (3):229 - 242.
  22. Plato’s Distinction Between Being and Becoming.Robert Bolton - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):66 - 95.
    There are three main views of the development of Plato’s distinction between being and becoming which have been defended in recent times. Most scholars have thought that Plato always held the same version of the distinction despite appearances to the contrary. But some who have taken this position have thought that Plato took the realm of being to consist of things which never change in any way, and the realm of becoming to consist of things which are never stable in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  23. Aristotle's Analysis of Change and Plato's Theory of Transcendent Ideas.Chung-Hwan Chen - 1975 - Phronesis 20 (2):129-145.
  24. Rest and Motion in the Sophist.Fred R. Berger - 1965 - Phronesis 10 (1):70-77.
  25. Notes on Plato's Concept of Time.Francis V. Courneen - 1940 - Modern Schoolman 18 (2):35-36.
  26. Plato’s Conception of the Cosmos.Hartley B. Alexander - 1918 - The Monist 28 (1):1-24.
  27. The Idea of Nature in Plato.Alfred Benn - 1896 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 9 (1):24-49.