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  1. Did Socrates Know How to See Your Middle Eye?Samuel Allen Alexander & Christopher Yang - 2021 - The Reasoner 15 (4):30-31.
    We describe in our own words a visual phenomenon first described by Gallagher and Tsuchiya in 2020. The key to the phenomenon (as we describe it) is to direct one’s left eye at the image of one's left eye, while simultaneously directing one's right eye at the image of one's right eye. We suggest that one would naturally arrive at this phenomenon if one took a sufficiently literal reading of certain words of Socrates preserved in Plato's Alcibiades. We speculate that (...)
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  2. Socrates and Alcibiades: Plato’s Drama of Political Ambition and Philosophy. By Ariel Helfer.Zina Giannopoulou - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (1):234-237.
  3. Olympiodorus, On Plato First Alcibiades 10-28_ _, Written by Michael Griffin.Sebastian Gertz - 2017 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 11 (1):113-115.
  4. Politics in Socrates’ Alcibiades: A Philosophical Account of Plato’s Dialogue Alcibiades Major, Written by Andre Archie.Jakub Jirsa - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):172-176.
  5. Relações entre a noção de “cuidado-da-alma” e o “conhecimento de si” no Primeiro Alcibíades.Marcos Sidnei Pagotto-Euzebio - 2017 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 38 (1):93-108.
    O artigo busca apresentar as relações entre as exigências de cuidado-da-alma e a necessidade do conhecimento-de-si presentes no diálogo platônico Primeiro Alcibíades, indicando a forte ligação de tal aperfeiçoamento de si com o da pólis. Também as dimensões erótica, teológica, ética e política se encontram firmemente unidas no diálogo, visto que a formação do homem político exige o vínculo entre discípulo e mestre, sendo este o guia em direção ao reconhecimento da divindade, pois conhecer-se significa, ao final, conhecer a alma (...)
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  6. Autoengaño, ambición y arrogancia en el Alcibíades de Platón.Daniel Vázquez - 2016 - In J. M. Roqueñi (ed.), Afectividad y confianza en el conocimiento personal. Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico: pp. 13-30.
  7. A relação entre a Alma e o Cuidado de Si no Alcibíades I de Platão.Luiz Felipe da Silva Carvalho - 2015 - Dissertation, UFF, Brazil
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  8. The Failed Seduction: Alcibiades, Socrates, and the Epithumetic Comportment.James M. Ambury - 2013 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):257-274.
    In this paper I argue that Plato’s Alcibiades is the embodiment of what I call the epithumetic comportment, a way of life made possible by the naïve ontological assumption that appearance is all that is. In the first part of the paper, I read select portions of the Alcibiades I and establish a distinction between the epithumetic comportment, which desires gratification in exchange for flattery, and the erotic comportment, which desires care of the soul. In the second half of the (...)
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  9. Socrates' Daimonic Art: Love for Wisdom in Four Platonic Dialogues.Elizabeth S. Belfiore - 2012 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite increasing interest in the figure of Socrates and in love in ancient Greece, no recent monograph studies these topics in all four of Plato's dialogues on love and friendship. This book provides important new insights into these subjects by examining Plato's characterization of Socrates in Symposium, Phaedrus, Lysis and the often neglected Alcibiades I. It focuses on the specific ways in which the philosopher searches for wisdom together with his young interlocutors, using an art that is 'erotic', not in (...)
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  10. The Anatomy of Three Thought Experiments in Plato’s Republic, Apology, and Alcibiades Minor.Andre M. Archie - 2010 - Journal of Philosophical Research 35:305-321.
    I argue that Plato’s use of thought experiments anticipate many of the themes discussed by Thomas S. Kuhn’s classic essay, “A Function for Thought Experiments.” Kuhn’s concern is that thought experiments satisfy the condition of verisimilitude. That is, thought experiments must not be conducted merely to alter the conceptual apparatus of the scientist regarding the phenomenon explored, but rather to alter the scientist’s conceptual apparatus for the sake of altering his actions (i.e., practical rationality). Plato, too, is quite concerned with (...)
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  11. Love as a Problem of Knowledge in Kierkegaard's Either/Or and Plato's Symposium.Ulrika Carlsson - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):41-67.
    At the end of the essay “Silhouettes” in Either/Or , Kierkegaard writes, “only the person who has been bitten by snakes knows what one who has been bitten by snakes must suffer.” I interpret this as an allusion to Alcibiades' speech in Plato's Symposium. Kierkegaard invites the reader to compare Socrates to Don Giovanni, and Alcibiades to the seduced women. Socrates' philosophical method, in this light, is a deceptive seduction: just as Don Giovanni's seduction leads his conquests to unhappy love—what (...)
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  12. Authenticity of Alcibiades I: Some Reflections. Jirsa - 2009 - Listy filologicke 132 (3-4):225-244.
    This text maps the history of debate on the authenticity of Plato's or pseudo-Plato's Alcibiades I.
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  13. Plato, Alcibiades I 122e.N. Hopkinson - 2008 - Classical Quarterly 58 (2):673-.
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  14. Instances of Decision Theory in Plato’s Alcibiades Major and Minor and in Xenophon’s Memorabilia.Andre Archie - 2006 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):365-380.
    This essay discusses Socrates’ use of hypothetical choices as an early version of what was to become in the twentieth century the discipline of decision theory as expressed by one of its prominent proponents, F. P. Ramsey. Socrates’ use of hypothetical choices and thought experiments in the dialogues is a way of reassuring himself of an interlocutor’s philosophical potential. For example, to assess just how far Alcibiades is willing to go to attain his goal of being a great Athenian leader, (...)
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  15. Eros and Philosophical Seduction in Alcibiades I.Jill Gordon - 2003 - Ancient Philosophy 23 (1):11-30.
    This essay interprets Alcibiades I as representing Socrates' philosophical seduction of Alcibiades. Socrates and Alcibiades are both highly erotic characters, and Socrates attempts to provoke and then guide Alcibiades' erotic tendencies in philosophical directions. The erotic relationship between Socrates and Alcibiades, including Socrates' attraction to Alcibiades, is central to understanding the themes, which also appear in the dialogue, of self-knowledge, political ambition, self-care, divine versus human guidance, and corruption at the hands of the Athenians. Along the way, the essay responds (...)
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  16. J.-F. Pradeau : Platon: Alcibiade. Pp. 243. Paris: G. F. Flammarion, 1999. Paper, frs. 39. ISBN: 2-08070988-7.Nicholas Denyer - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (1):278-279.
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  17. The Arousal of Emotion in Plato's Dialogues.David L. Blank - 1993 - Classical Quarterly 43 (02):428-.
    In Aeschines' dialogue Alcibiades, Socrates sees his brilliant young partner's haughty attitude towards the great Themistocles. Thereupon he gives an encomium of Themistocles, a man whose wisdom and arete, great as they were, could not save him from ostracism by his own people. This encomium has an extraordinary effect on Alcibiades: he cries and in his despair places his head upon Socrates' knee, realizing that he is nowhere near as good a man as Themistocles . Aeschines later has Socrates say (...)
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  18. A. Ph. Segonds: Proclus. Sur le Premier Alcibiade de Platon, Tome II. (Collection des Universitiés de France (Budé).) Pp. 260 (Text Double). Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1986. [REVIEW]Anne Sheppard - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (01):150.
  19. "Self-Knowledge in Early Plato".Julia Annas - 1985 - In Dominic J. O'Meara (ed.), Platonic Investigations. CUA Press. pp. 111-138.
  20. Cornelius Anton Bos: Interpretatie, underschap en datering van de Alcibiades Maior. (Amsterdam diss.) Pp. 120. Culemborg, Netherlands: Tjeenk Willink-Noorduijn N.V., 1970. Paper. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (02):271-.
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  21. Proclus: Alcibiades I. Proclus - 1971 - The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.
  22. Olympiodorus, Commentary on the First Alcibiades of Plato. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1958 - The Classical Review 8 (1):81-81.
  23. Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Alcibiades. [REVIEW]J. L. Ackrill - 1955 - The Classical Review 5 (3-4):271-272.
  24. The Origin of the Greater Alcibiades.R. S. Bluck - 1953 - Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):46-.
    The arguments usually propounded to show that the Greater Alcibiades was not written by Plato seem to me, by themselves, inconclusive. I believe that it would be better to begin by arguing that we are given a suggestion of a generic or universal likeness between one innermost ‘self’ and another, and a method of acquiring wisdom and of apprehending God that are hardly in keeping with Plato's dialogues. My present purpose, however, is to draw attention to a striking parallelism between (...)
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  25. Alcibiades (Part 2) (Greek and English). Plato - unknown
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  26. The First Alcibiades. Plato - unknown
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  27. Alcibiades (Part 1) (Greek and English). Plato - unknown
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