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Summary

When many people hear "philosophy of film" they think "philosophy through film." That is, they think of work on the philosophical contributions made by film.  This middle category is home to work that explores the philosophy found in movies and philosophy done in conjunction with a film. It contains both philosophy in film and philosophy through film. The most common approach is that addressing a single film. Less common, some address the philosophy of a filmmaker. And, even less common, some work on the philosophical insights to be had from particular genres of film, such screwball comedy and the western.

Key works The special issue of the Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism on the philosophy of film (Smith & Wartenberg 2006) features several essays exploring the philosophic potential of film.  The exchange between Livingston 1991 and Smuts 2009 provides a good introduction to question, Can film do philosophy? Grau 2005 is an excellent example of philosophy through film.
Introductions Livingston 2010 provides an introduction to the area.
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263 found
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  1. Love, Death and Life's Summum Bonum: The Before Trilogy as Memento Mori.Anna Christina Ribeiro - manuscript
    I argue that Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, and Before Midnight are best seen as an example of memento mori art. Memento mori, the admonition to remember death, can take many forms, but the idea remains the same, namely that an awareness of our inevitable end should bear on how we live. I show how Richard Linklater’s warning works in each of the movies and argue that with the Before trilogy he makes a Frankfurt-style case that romantic love is life’s summum (...)
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  2. A Grammar in Two Dimensions: The Temporal Mechanics of Arrival and the Semantics/Pragmatics Divide.A. G. Holdier - forthcoming - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy.
    Within the philosophy of language, contextualists typically hold (and semantic minimalists deny) that pragmatic elements of an utterance can affect its semantic content. This paper concretizes this debate by analogizing both positions to different kinds of time-travel stories: contextualism is akin to Ludovician narratives that deny the possibility of temporal editing (or “the changing of past events”) while semantic minimalism is aligned with stories that allow the past to be literally altered. By focusing particularly on Denis Villeneuve’s 2016 film Arrival, (...)
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  3. Fight Club as Philosophy: I am Jack’s Existential Struggle.Alberto Oya - forthcoming - In David Kyle Johnson (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Popular Culture as Philosophy.
    The aim of this chapter is to analyze the movie Fight Club, directed by David Fincher, written by Jim Uhls, and first released in the fall of 1999. The movie is based on the homonym novel by Chuck Palahniuk, published in 1996. I will argue that Fight Club is to be understood in primarily existentialist, nonethical, and nonevidential terms, showing the struggle felt by each and every one of us to find a convincing answer to the question of what (if (...)
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  4. Thought Without a Thinking Subject; or, Karl Popper as Film-Philosopher.A. Thomas - forthcoming - .
    The most interesting, and problematic, claim made by film-philosophy, for me, is the proposition that film thinks. This claim is interesting because it asserts that film has something philosophical to offer that philosophy itself lacks. It is problematic because we tend to think that where there is thinking, there must be a someone doing that thinking. And whatever film is, it is not a someone. This paper brings Karl Poppers model of objective knowledge what he calls knowledge in the absence (...)
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  5. Not One Power, But Two: Dark Grounds and Twilit Paradises in Malick.Jussi M. Backman - 2023 - In Steven DeLay (ed.), Life Above the Clouds: Philosophy in the Films of Terrence Malick. Albany: State University of New York Press. pp. 127-146.
    "If the previous chapters by Cabrera, Reid and Craig, and Cerbone all accentuate the paradox of existence, that our being-in-the-world is simultaneously beautiful and ugly, good and evil, joyous and painful, Jussi Backman's "Not One Power, But Two: Dark Grounds and Twilit Paradises in Malick" investigates this fundamental ambivalence in terms of Schelling's doctrine of evil, a view that assigns evil (and hence melancholy) a fundamental place as a basic principle of reality. Backman's suggestion at once deepens and complexifies the (...)
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  6. Love can thaw a frozen heart : the philosophy of love in Disney's Frozen films.Erin Archer - 2022 - In William H. U. Anderson (ed.), Film, Philosophy and Religion. Vernon Press.
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  7. Appealing, Appalling: Morality and Revenge in I Spit on Your Grave (2010).Steve Jones - 2022 - Quarterly Review of Film and Video:1-25.
    Despite being a prevalent theme in popular cinema, revenge has received little dedicated attention within film studies. The majority of research concerning the concept of revenge is located within moral philosophy, but that body of literature has been overlooked by film studies scholars. Philosophers routinely draw on filmic examples to illustrate their discussions of revenge, but those interpretations are commonly hindered by their authors’ inexperience with film studies’ analytical methods. This article seeks to bridge those gaps. The 2010 remake of (...)
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  8. Rebecca A. Sheehan (2020) American Avant-Garde Cinema's Philosophy of the In-Between.Giulia Rho - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):98-101.
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  9. Nietzsche in Hollywood: Images of the Übermensch in Early American Cinema.Matthew Rukgaber - 2022 - Albany, NY, USA: State University of New York Press.
    ISBN 978-1-4384-9027-4 Argues that Nietzsche’s idea of the Übermensch was a central concern of filmmakers in the 1920s and 1930s. -/- Nietzsche in Hollywood offers a compelling and startling history of Hollywood film in which the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and his idea of the Übermensch looms large. Though Nietzsche’s philosophy was attacked as egoistic and a sociopathic version of Darwinism in films from the 1910s, it undergoes a series of cinematic and philosophical transformations in the 1920s and 1930s under (...)
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  10. Tony “Two-Toes”: the pragmatics of nicknames in films.Kristina Šekrst - 2022 - Quarterly Review of Film and Video.
    Films frequently employ nicknames not only for villains but also for non-criminal characters. In this paper, I present a classification of nicknames used in films, along with various examples, mostly from crime-related films. I argue that the use of nicknames in films is important not for the sake of reference, but for the sake of an additional narrative told by the nickname as a shorthand description of a character's background (cf. Tony “Two-Toes”, “Dirty” Harry, “Doc” Erwin or “Hatchet” Harry Lonsdale). (...)
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  11. Scorsese and Plato : a philosophical method for cinematic analysis and discovering divine revelation.Matthew Small - 2022 - In William H. U. Anderson (ed.), Film, Philosophy and Religion. Vernon Press.
  12. Noël Carroll, "Philosophy and the Moving Image.". [REVIEW]Clotilde Torregrossa - 2022 - Philosophy in Review 42 (4):4-7.
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  13. Cinema e o Sonho Implicado: Uma leitura Deleuziana.Susana Viegas - 2022 - Rebeca, Revista Brasileira de Estudos de Cinema E Audiovisual 11 (21):203-219.
    The Deleuzian studies on cinema highlight the importance of two semiotic regimes (movement-image and time-image) for the understanding of our aesthetical and epistemological relationship with moving images. On the contrary, this article highlights the moments of crisis between the two regimes, pointing out the generic character of uncertainty and ambiguity in the nature of mental images: once the sensorimotor scheme that dominates the cinematographic montage has been weakened, the characters, unable to act, can imagine, desire, dream, hallucinate, and remember. New (...)
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  14. Time in Cinema and Modern Art: Reflections Inspired by Farshad Zahedi and Francisco Jiménez Alcarria’s The Petrified Object And The Poetics Of Time In Cinema.Susana Viegas - 2022 - Journal of Science and Technology of the Arts 2 (14):125-129.
    Inspired by Farshad Zahedi’s audiovisual essay The Petrified Object and the Poetics of Time in Cinema, this article briefly presents three philosophical approaches to cinema’s ways of expressing time – as articulated by Bergson, Tarkovsky, and Deleuze – and questions how absolute time and chronological time are brought to a state of crisis by this modern form of art.
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  15. Rupert Read (2019) A Film-Philosophy of Ecology and Enlightenment.Rong Wan - 2022 - Film-Philosophy 26 (1):86-89.
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  16. Kierkegaard’s Three Spheres and Cinematic Fairy Tale Pedagogy in 'Frozen,' 'Moana,' and 'Tangled'.A. G. Holdier - 2021 - Journal of Religion and Popular Culture 33 (2):105–119.
    Although Disney films are sometimes denigrated as popular or “low” art forms, this article argues that they often engage deeply with, and thereby communicate, significant moral truths. The capitalistic enterprise of contemporary modern cinema demands that cinematic moral pedagogy be sublimated into non-partisan forms, often by substituting secular proxies for otherwise divine or spiritual components. By adapting Søren Kierkegaard’s tripartite existential anthropology of the self, I analyze the subjective experiences of the protagonists in three recent animated fairy tales—Disney’s Frozen, Moana, (...)
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  17. “Teach Me To Do What’s Right”: Faith, Hope, and Love as Post-Religious Virtues.A. G. Holdier - 2021 - Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 20 (3).
    According to Thomas Aquinas, what distinguishes the theological from the cardinal virtues is the nature of their object: the latter aim at the natural excellence of humans, while the former direct us beyond ourselves to focus on the Divine. This paper considers the cinematic work of Drew Goddard — in particular, his 2018 film _Bad Times at the El Royale_ — as a post-religious response to Aquinas, insofar as it retains and re-presents Faith, Hope, and Love as valuable elements of (...)
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  18. Is Alex Redeemable? "A Clockwork Orange" as a Philosophical-Literary Platonic Fable.Jones Irwin - 2021 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 4:1-10.
    This essay explores the philosophical significance of Anthony Burgess’s 1960s novel "A Clockwork Orange." Specific themes in this novel are developed through character and situation, in a way which takes cognisance of important problems in the history of philosophy. The essay looks at two particular themes in this context. The first relates to the epistemological question of the distinction between truth and illusion. The novel thematizes the demarcation between truth and illusion, or truth and appearance, and raises the issue of (...)
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  19. If Nancy Doesn’t Wake Up Screaming: The Elm Street Series as Recurring Nightmare.Steve Jones - 2021 - In Mark McKenna & William Proctor (eds.), Horror Franchise Cinema. London, England: Routledge. pp. 81-93.
    Long-running horror series are reputed to yield diminishing returns (both in terms of profit and quality). At first glance, the A Nightmare on Elm Street series appears to fit that established pattern. For instance, lead antagonist Freddy supposedly ‘deteriorates’ from sinister, backlit child molester to comic-book ‘Las Vegas lounge’ stand-up act by the end of the 1980s (Schoell and Spencer 1992, 116). However, interviews from the period indicate that comedy was a central component from the outset of the series; it (...)
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  20. Philosophy Through Film, 4th edition.Amy Karofsky & Mary M. Litch - 2021 - Routledge.
    Some of the world’s best-loved films can be used as springboards for examining enduring philosophical questions. Philosophy Through Film provides guidance on how to watch films with an eye for their philosophical content, helping students become familiar with key topics in all of the major areas in Western philosophy, and helping them to master the techniques of philosophical argumentation. -/- The perfect size and scope for a first course in philosophy, Philosophy Through Film assumes no prior knowledge of philosophy. It (...)
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  21. Becoming a Victim.Marguerite La Caze - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (4):899-916.
    Euzhan Palcy’s film A Dry White Season, set in apartheid South Africa, portrays a resistance not intended to lead to victimhood, yet leads to the death of the Afrikaans protagonist, Benjamin Du Toit. The narrative follows Ben as they are educated about Black South Africans’ suffering under apartheid, their growing activism and simultaneous increasing victimization beside that of their Black friends. I first examine how early political critics of the film thought it stressed the victimization of the white character at (...)
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  22. Philosophers on Film: Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight.Hans Maes & Katrien Schaubroeck (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    Richard Linklater’s celebrated Before trilogy chronicles the love of Jesse (Ethan Hawke) and Céline (Julie Delpy) who first meet up in Before Sunrise, later reconnect in Before Sunset and finally experience a fall-out in Before Midnight. Not only do these films present storylines and dilemmas that invite philosophical discussion, but philosophical discussion itself is at the very heart of the trilogy. This book, containing specially commissioned chapters by a roster of international contributors, explores the many philosophical themes that feature so (...)
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  23. Transformational Ethics of Film: Thinking the Cinemakeover in the Film-Philosophy Debate.Martin P. Rossouw - 2021 - Boston: Brill | Rodopi.
    Charting new routes for film ethics, _Transformational Ethics of Film_ develops a critical account of the ethics of personal transformation at work within the ‘film as philosophy’ debate.
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  24. Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva, and Steven S. Gouveia (eds.) (2019) Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides.Eddy Troy - 2021 - Film-Philosophy 25 (3):390-392.
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  25. Introduction: The Leftovers, Philosophy and Popular Culture.Susana Viegas - 2021 - Cinema: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image 13 (13):7-20.
  26. Aguirre, Caché, and Creating Anti-Colonialist Puzzles: A Normative Perspective.Yusuf Yuksekdag - 2021 - In Handbook of Research on Contemporary Approaches to Orientalism in Media and Beyond. Hershey, PA, USA: pp. 165-180.
    This chapter explores the anti-colonial narrative potential of certain works of cinema taking Aguirre, the Wrath of God and Caché as a case in point. To do so, this chapter first and mainly draws upon the theoretical and normative lens put forward by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak on the representation of the colonized other and her resulting political and intellectual call for self-reflection on one's privileged Western intellectual positioning. This lens has many normative implications for the ways in which the colonized (...)
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  27. When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth: The Horror of Being Prey and Forgetting Nature, Yet Again, in Jurassic Park and Jurassic World.Eric Godoy - 2020 - In Jonathan Beever (ed.), Philosophy, Film, and the Dark Side of Interdependence. Lanham: Lexington Books. pp. 141-155.
    We constantly forget our interdependence with nature as we lose track of what “natural” means. Consider especially the American nostalgia for an imagined past believed to be lost; a past in which our relationship with nature was more authentic, more natural. Yet, as I argue below, such a past never really existed. The scary thing is, so long as that nostalgia guides our desire for a return to a “proper” relationship with nature, we’re bound to be misguided and forget again (...)
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  28. Chile 1988: Trauma and Resistance in Pablo Larrain's No (2012).Marguerite La Caze - 2020 - In Amy L. Hubbell, Natsuko Akagawa, Sol Rojas-Lizana & Annie Pohlman (eds.), Places of Traumatic Memory: A Global Context. London: pp. 285-307.
    No presents the television campaign for the 1988 plebiscite on whether the Pinochet regime should stay as the government for eight more years (‘Yes’) or hold democratic elections (‘No’). The ‘No’ campaign uses the Aristotelian idea that happiness is an intrinsic value and thus the best concept to galvanise a traumatised nation in favour of change. My paper examines the film’s presentation of how a response to the trauma of the regime becomes transformed into resistance through the idea of a (...)
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  29. Realism as resistance.Marguerite La Caze - 2020 - Angelaki 25 (5):156-170.
    This paper explores the potential of realist cinema to portray resistance to oppression and restrictions on people’s lives. Wadjda presents a special case in world cinema in being made in Sa...
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  30. Facing the Responsibility of Parenthood in the Films of the Dardenne Brothers.John McAteer - 2020 - Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal 103 (3):346-366.
    This article analyzes the way the films of Belgian writer-directors Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne portray characters taking responsibility for children and children allowing others to take responsibility for them. Though the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas provides a starting point, this article focuses primarily on a close reading of the Dardennes' films themselves. It argues that these films illuminate the nature of parenthood and suggest a unified definition of parenthood that encompasses both biological parenthood and adoption. In both cases a parent (...)
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  31. Der Mensch im Spiegel seiner (Bild-) Schöpfung: Die ästhetisierte Anthropologie des Kamera-Auges in „Chelovek s kino-apparatom“ und „Blade Runner“.Peter Remmers - 2020 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Philosophische Anthropologie 9 (1):277-294.
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  32. The Dark Night of Ecological Despair: Awaiting Reconsecration in Paul Schrader’s First Reformed.Chandler D. Rogers & Tober Corrigan - 2020 - In Philosophy, Film, and the Dark Side of Interdependence. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington. pp. 69-81.
  33. The Eyes of God.Nigel R. Shadbolt & Paul Smart - 2020 - In Timothy Shanahan & Paul R. Smart (eds.), Blade Runner 2049: A Philosophical Exploration. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 206–227.
  34. The Philosophy of Werner Herzog.M. Blake Wilson & Christopher Turner (eds.) - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    Legendary director, actor, author, and provocateur Werner Herzog has incalculably influenced contemporary cinema for decades. This essay collection by professional philosophers and film theorists from around the globe offers a diversity of perspectives on how the thinking behind the camera is revealed in the action Herzog captures in front of it.
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  35. “You Ain’t Gonna Get Away Wit’ This, Django”: Fantasy, Fiction and Subversion in Quentin Tarantino’s, Django Unchained.Jack Black - 2019 - Quarterly Review of Film and Video 36 (7):611-637.
    From 2009 to 2015, U.S. director, Quentin Tarantino, released three films that were notable for their focus on particular historical events, periods and individuals (Inglorious Basterds 2009; Django Unchained 2012; The Hateful Eight 2015). Together, these films offered a specifically “Tarantinian” rendering of history: rewriting, manipulating and, for some, unethically deploying history for aesthetic effect. With regard to Django Unchained, this article examines how Tarantino’s historical revisionism provides a valuable point of inquiry into the ways in which “history” is depicted (...)
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  36. Philosophical dimensions of cinematic experience.David Davies - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven S. Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 135-156.
    This chapter critically examines the idea that some cinematic artworks “do philosophy”. It is argued that any interesting “film as philosophy” thesis must satisfy two conditions: (FP1) In any advance in philosophical understanding attributable to a cinematic artwork, the philosophical content through which such an advance is accomplished must be articulated in a manner that is distinctively cinematic, on a proper understanding of the latter; (FP2) The advance in philosophical understanding attributable to a cinematic artwork must occur in the course (...)
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  37. European Cinema and Continental Philosophy: Film as Thought Experiment, by Thomas Elsaesser. [REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2019 - Alphaville 18:232–238.
    Thomas Elsaesser’s recent scholarship has examined the “mind-game film”, a phenomenon in Hollywood that is broadly characterised by multi-platform storytelling, paratextual narrative feedback loops, nonlinear storytelling, and unreliable character perspectives. While “mind-game” or “puzzle” films have become a contentious subject amongst post-cinema scholars concerned with Hollywood storytelling, what is to be said of contemporary European independent cinema? Elsaesser’s timely publication, European Cinema and Continental Philosophy, examines an amalgam of politically inclined European auteurs to resolve this query. Elsaesser concedes that there (...)
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  38. Navigating Agamben’s Cinematic Paradox via Laruellean Immanence: A Hacktivist Cast Study.Ekin Erkan - 2019 - MediaCommons 8:1-23.
    While many film theorists declare Agamben as, in equal part, a Deleuzian film theorist, I pose that, through this Benjaminian lens, we can parse distinctive cinematic questions that Agamben exclusively pursues - in particular, cinema's potential as a repurposive counter-dispositif to combat dominant forms via critique. This is not to suggest that parallels do not exist between Agamben and Deleuze’s approaches: as Meillassoux has noted, Deleuze's logic of representation (also known as "correlationism") develops an "image of thought that attempts to (...)
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  39. Philosophical experience and experimental film.Chris Falzon - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 159-173.
    One way that philosophy can be related to film is via the notion of experiment. This connection is usually discussed in terms of similarities between film and the thought experiments that can be found within philosophical texts. However, rather than subsuming film to the philosophical thought experiment, which risks missing what film itself contributes to the proceedings, it is more interesting to see how the cinematic medium might allow for forms of experimentation that go beyond what can be undertaken within (...)
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  40. Introducing Cinematic Humanism: A Solution to the Problem of Cinematic Cognitivism.Britt Harrison - 2019 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):331-349.
    A Cinematic Humanist approach to film is committed inter alia to the following tenet: Some fiction films illuminate the human condition thereby enriching our understanding of ourselves, each other and our world. As such, Cinematic Humanism might reasonably be regarded as an example of what one might call ‘Cinematic Cognitivism’. This assumption would, however, be mistaken. For Cinematic Humanism is an alternative, indeed a corrective, to Cinematic Cognitivism. Motivating the need for such a corrective is a genuine scepticism about the (...)
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  41. ‘I've Never Met A Me’: Identity and Philosophy in D'Ailleurs, Derrida.Marguerite La Caze - 2019 - Derrida Today 12 (2):152-170.
    The tension between the absence of identity and the feeling of presence theorised in Jacques Derrida's philosophy is revealed in D'ailleurs Derrida, a film by Safaa Fathy (1999). Fathy's film has had limited scholarly attention, yet it makes a distinctive contribution both to understanding and questioning Derridean thought. I argue that the not-meness of identity is revealed by Fathy through the theme of ‘elsewhere’ (ailleurs) in the film and yet it allows the audience to experience the tone and cadence of (...)
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  42. Graham Jones and Ashley Woodward Acinemas: Lyotard's Philosophy of Film.Dominic Lash - 2019 - Film-Philosophy 23 (3):391-394.
    Review of Graham Jones and Ashley Woodward, eds., "Acinemas: Lyotard's Philosophy of Film" (Edinburgh University Press).
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  43. The Bold Thesis Retried: On Cinema as Philosophy.Paisley Livingston - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 81-91.
    This paper begins by presenting a simple model that maps some salient positions on the topic of cinema as philosophy, including the very strong claims that are constitutive of what has been stipulated to be “the bold thesis.” It is contended that examples that have been adduced in the literature as substantiating that bold thesis in fact only support weaker claims. It is argued in favor of accepting some such theses on the topic. It is then introduced a number of (...)
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  44. The Palgrave Handbook of Posthumanism in Film and Television by Michael Hauskeller, Thomas Philbeck, and Curtis Carbonell (review). [REVIEW]Lantz Fleming Miller - 2019 - Film and History 49 (2):94-96.
    Science fiction has served the film industry like a dreamy stepchild. It gets only scant accolades from its master but must do heavy lifting: that is, make money. While science-fiction films often emphasize spectacle and action, they also inspire philosophical contemplation. Why? Science fiction, dating back to Shelley and Verne, came into existence speculating about humanity's social and physical worlds. Many books and articles over the past several years discuss the philosophical issues that films raise. One fairly new school of (...)
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  45. The Wartenberg-Smith Film as Philosophy Debate: Review of Current Controversies in Philosophy of Film. [REVIEW]Diana Neiva - 2019 - American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 11 (1):1-13.
  46. Are There Definite Objections to Film as Philosophy? Metaphilosophical Considerations.Diana Neiva - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven S. Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. Nova Iorque, NY, Estados Unidos: Routledge Press, Research on Aesthetics. pp. 116-134.
    The “film as philosophy” (FAP) hypothesis turned into a field if its own right during the 2000s, after S. Mulhall’s On Film (2001). In this work, Mulhall defended that some films philosophize for themselves. This caused controversy. Around the same time of On Film’s release, B. Russell published the article “The philosophical limits of film” (2000). This article had one of the first attacks against FAP, posing some main objections based on metaphilosophical grounds, which were called the “generality” and the (...)
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  47. Could a Heptapod Act? Language and Agency in Arrival.James Pearson - 2019 - Film and Philosophy 23:48-68.
    Arrival offers a useful thought experiment in the philosophy of mind and language. Assessing human linguists' interpretive efforts to understand the alien heptapod form of life in both the movie and the novella from which it was adapted (Ted Chiang’s “Story of Your Life”) teach us how our understanding of selfhood shapes our conception of agency. Arrival’s reflexive commentary on the cinematic experience is also an argument for the value of learning to communicate in cinematic language.
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  48. Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides.Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven S. Gouveia (eds.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge Press, Research on Aesthetics.
    This volume collects twenty original essays on the philosophy of film. It uniquely brings together scholars working across a range of philosophical traditions and academic disciplines to broaden and advance debates on film and philosophy. The book includes contributions from a number of prominent philosophers of film including Noël Carroll, Chris Falzon, Deborah Knight, Paisley Livingston, Robert Sinnerbrink, Malcolm Turvey, and Thomas Wartenberg. While the topics explored by the contributors are diverse, there are a number of thematic threads that connect (...)
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  49. Filmosophy/Film as Philosophy.Robert Sinnerbrink - 2019 - In Noël Carroll, Laura T. Di Summa & Shawn Loht (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures. Springer. pp. 513-539.
    This chapter offers a critical discussion of the idea of filmosophy or film as philosophy. I explore the debate surrounding the idea of “film as philosophy”, distinguishing this approach from more traditional philosophy of film, and suggesting that it has a long history going back to key figures in early film theory. I then focus on the seminal work of Stanley Cavell and Gilles Deleuze, often described as the inaugurators of film-philosophy. Finally, I examine recent proposals concerning the idea of (...)
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  50. Contemporary Philosophical Filmmaking.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2019 - In Noël Carroll, Laura T. Di Summa & Shawn Loht (eds.), The Palgrave Handbook of the Philosophy of Film and Motion Pictures. Springer. pp. 491-511.
    Although there has been an extensive debate about whether films can actually do philosophy, this chapter bypasses that debate in order to examine a number of different ways in which philosophy has been done by contemporary filmmakers. Using a variety of different films from different genres—including Anomalisa, an animated film; Amour, a narrative fiction film; and The Act of Killing, a documentary—the chapter explores some of the central ways that philosophy has been done on film—such as providing a counterexample to (...)
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