Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology

Edited by Şerife Tekin (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Assistant editor: Jaipreet Mattu (University of Western Ontario)
About this topic
Summary Philosophy of Psychiatry and Psychopathology occurs at the intersection of general philosophy of science, philosophy of mind, and ethics. It aims to develop answers to a set of theoretical and practical questions pertaining to the nature of mental disorders, mental health research, and practice.
Key works [BROKEN REFERENCE: RADDAEw]#MURPIT Radden 2004 Graham 2002 Fulford 2006 Poland 2011 Thornton 2007 Sadler 2004 Hacking 1995 Flanagan 1999 Schaffner 1993
Introductions Fulford & Sadler 2009 [BROKEN REFERENCE: NATTNPw]#MARPN
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  1. Understanding Substance Use Disorders Among Veterans: Virtues of the Multitudinous Self Model.Şerife Tekin - 2022 - In Evaluating the Brain Disease Model of Addiction.
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  2. 'So Don't You Lock Up Something / That You Wanted to See Fly'. What Story for Asylum Psychiatry? [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2021 - Romanian Journal of Communication and Public Relations 23:71-79.
    In a rather long piece which an exhibition catalog has called „catholic propaganda”(Busch & Maisak, 2013, p. 342), Guido Görres reflected on madness and art, using Kaulbach’s iconic 1835 drawing of asylum inmates (Das Narrenhaus) as pretext. Görres wrote of “this hospital of the human spirit (…), this charnel ground of the living, who like specters roam, wearing on their foreheads the faded and almost illegible traces of their former names.”1(1836, p. 9). Overdramatic prose, but unlikely to strike one as (...)
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  3. Review of 'Madness Is Civilization' by Michael Staub. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2013 - Metapsychology.
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  4. Review of 'Making Minds and Madness: From Hysteria to Depression' by Mikkel Borch-Jacobsen. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2011 - Metapsychology.
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  5. Review of 'The Measure of Madness' by Philip Gerrans. [REVIEW]George Tudorie - 2016 - Metapsychology.
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  6. The Ignoring of Raymond Tallis on Literary Theory and the SYSTEMS THEORY of Gender Differences.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    Why was Raymond Tallis’s book Not Saussure largely ignored by literary critics? Here I present one response to this question: he does not offer a novel alternative system for literary interpretation. And I consider whether the situation is any different in other fields, introducing a rival to Simon Baron-Cohen’s empathizing-systematizing theory of gender differences when doing so.
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  7. What Underlies Death/Suicide Implicit Association Test Measures and How It Contributes to Suicidal Action.René Baston - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-24.
    Recently, psychologists have developed indirect measurement procedures to predict suicidal behavior. A prominent example is the Death/Suicide Implicit Association Test (DS-IAT). In this paper, I argue that there is something special about the DS-IAT which distinguishes it from different IAT measures. I argue that the DS-IAT does not measure weak or strong associations between the implicit self-concept and the abstract concept of death. In contrast, assuming a goal-system approach, I suggest that sorting death-related to self-related words takes effort because death-related (...)
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  8. Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Experiences of Aversion Therapy in England.Helen Spandler & Sarah Carr - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512110594.
    This article presents the findings of a study about the history of aversion therapy as a treatment technique in the English mental health system to convert lesbians and bisexual women into heterosexual women. We explored published psychiatric and psychological literature, as well as lesbian, gay, and bisexual archives and anthologies. We identified 10 examples of young women receiving aversion therapy in England in the 1960s and 1970s. We situate our discussion within the context of post-war British and transnational medical history. (...)
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  9. On the Very Idea of an Extreme Female Brain.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    According to Simon Baron-Cohen, having a male brain disposes a person to be more systematic than empathetic, whereas having a female brain disposes a person to be more empathetic than systematic. However, one can be a male human being with a female brain or a female human being with a male brain. Autistics have an extreme version of the male brain, says Baron-Cohen. In this paper, I present an “a priori” argument against the very idea of an extreme female brain.
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  10. Accountability and Autonomy.John R. Peteet, Charlotte V. O. Witvliet & C. Stephen Evans - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):69-71.
    Christian miller invites further clarification about the relationship between accountability and autonomy. Whereas embracing accountability to others for one’s responsibilities in those relationships emphasizes relationality, autonomy accents the individual’s own capacities to exhibit agency in enacting one’s decisions. Accordingly, we theorize that relational capacities for empathic concern and perspective-taking are especially important in the virtue of accountability. The capacity for self-regulation may serve both one’s autonomous pursuits and accountability for carrying out one’s responsibilities...
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  11. Accountability and the Cultivation of Virtue in Treatment.Michael Laney - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):65-67.
    Peteet, witvliet, and Evans have done a great service in bringing to our attention the importance of accountability in all aspects of psychiatric care, in assessments of accountability in our patients’ lives—its role in treatment planning and engagement, and identifying it as a goal of treatment itself. In their paper, the authors distinguish the virtue of accountability from merely being accountable to another person by emphasizing one’s embrace of being accountable to others as a motivated disposition that furthers human flourishing. (...)
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  12. Accountability, Autonomy, and Motivation.Christian B. Miller - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):61-63.
    John peteet, charlotte witvliet, and c. stephen evans are to be commended for drawing our attention to the relatively neglected virtue of accountability, and for making the case that it is an important virtue to cultivate in general and specifically within the context of psychiatry. I find little to object to in their discussion, and so my comments here will be more of an invitation for them to address in greater detail two important issues: the relationship between accountability and autonomy, (...)
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  13. Accountability as a Key Virtue in Mental Health and Human Flourishing.John R. Peteet, Charlotte V. O. Witvliet & C. Stephen Evans - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):49-60.
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  14. ‘Limited but Useful’: Datafied Brains and Digital Twins.Stephen Rainey - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):47-48.
    Ivery much appreciated the thoughtful response to my Datafied brains and digital twins: lessons from industry, caution for psychiatry provided by Douglas W. Heinrichs. I am encouraged that we differ merely in emphasis among the issues upon which we share a wider understanding.In his response, Assessing the Dangers of the Next Reductionist Fantasy, Heinrichs elaborates upon an underemphasized dimension in my Digital Twin article. Heinrichs approaches this dimension through “a semantic understanding of scientific theorizing.” According to this understanding, all science (...)
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  15. Assessing the Dangers of the Next Reductionist Fantasy.Douglas W. Heinrichs - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):43-45.
    In this thought-provoking article, a number of very valid and serious ethical concerns are raised about the potential application of research in neuro-circuitry to future treatment devices in clinical psychiatry. Rainey elaborates the basis for his concerns within the framework of a hypothetico-deductive notion of science,, and in his characterization.) From this perspective, the critical source of problems derives from an interposed step C in which “techniques are applied to extract relevant signals from the complicated raw signal.” The resulting characteristics (...)
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  16. Datafied Brains and Digital Twins: Lessons From Industry, Caution For Psychiatry.Stephen Rainey - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):29-42.
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  17. Phenomenology, Schizophrenia, and the Varieties of Understanding.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):17-19.
    This is a commentary on Humpston, C. S. (2022). “Isolated by Oneself: Ontologically Impossible Experiences in Schizophrenia.” Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology 29(1), 5–15. It is published with an additional commentary by H. Green and Humpston’s response.
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  18. Ordinary Language and Life-World Philosophies: Toward the Next Generation in Philosophy and Psychiatry.K. W. M. Fulford, Giovanni Stanghellini & John Z. Sadler - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):1-4.
    Philosophers have hitherto only interpreted the world in various ways; the point is to change it.Karl marx’s distinction between interpreting the world and changing it points by extension to the state of contemporary philosophy and psychiatry. The 1990s resurgence of interdisciplinary work in this area was driven equally by phenomenological scholarship and by initiatives in analytic philosophy. The former reflected the focus in phenomenology on ‘what it is like’ to experience a given mental symptom with the aim of reconstructing the (...)
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  19. Isolated by Oneself: Ontologically Impossible Experiences in Schizophrenia.Clara S. Humpston - 2022 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 29 (1):5-15.
    In the field of clinical practice, there does not seem to be too much contention about what schizophrenia is, at least from a high level. After all, there are various diagnostic systems and guidelines, all of which point toward schizophrenia as a psychotic syndrome which likely forms a continuum with other psychotic disorders. It may sound obvious that, according to the current definitions, the major commonality between schizophrenia and all other psychoses is psychotic symptoms; more precisely, delusions and hallucinations. Any (...)
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  20. Person-Centered Care in Psychiatry. Self-Relational, Contextual, and Normative Perspectives.Gerrit Glas - 2019 - Abingdon, Verenigd Koninkrijk: Routledge/Taylor&Francis.
    This book focuses on two important, interlinked themes in psychiatry, i.e., the relation between self (or: person), context and psychopathology; and the intrinsic value-ladenness of psychiatry as a practice. -/- Written against the background of scientistic tendencies in today’s psychiatry, it is argued in Part I that psychiatry needs a clinical conception of psychopathology alongside more traditional scientific conceptions; that this clinical conception of psychopathology must be based on a fundamental rethinking of the interaction between illness manifestations, contextual influences and (...)
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  21. Culture and Cognitive Science.Andreas De Block & Daniel Kelly - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Human behavior and thought often exhibit a familiar pattern of within group similarity and between group difference. Many of these patterns are attributed to cultural differences. For much of the history of its investigation into behavior and thought, however, cognitive science has been disproportionately focused on uncovering and explaining the more universal features of human minds—or the universal features of minds in general. -/- This entry charts out the ways in which this has changed over the past decades. It sketches (...)
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  22. A pluralistic account of degrees of control in addiction.Federico Burdman - 2022 - Philosophical Studies 179 (1):197-221.
    While some form of loss of control is often assumed to be a common feature of the diverse manifestations of addiction, it is far from clear how loss of control should be understood. In this paper, I put forward a concept of decrease in control in addiction that aims to fill this gap and thus provide a general framework for thinking about addictive behavior. The development of this account involves two main steps. First, I present a view of degrees of (...)
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  23. Reactive Natural Kinds and Varieties of Dependence.Harriet Fagerberg - manuscript
    This paper asks when a natural disease kind is truly 'reactive' and when it is merely associated with a corresponding social kind. I begin with a permissive account of real kinds and their structure, distinguishing natural kinds, indifferent kinds and reactive kinds as varieties of real kind characterised by super-explanatory properties. I then to situate disease kinds within this framework, arguing that many disease kinds prima facie are both natural and reactive. I proceed to distinguish ‘simple dependence’, ‘secondary dependence’ and (...)
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  24. Introducing the New PPP Editorial Team.John Z. Sadler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):399-403.
    Readers, please welcome the new Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology editorial team of Senior Editors and our Managing Editor. We are grateful to keep our veteran Senior Editors Tim Thornton, Nancy Potter, Mona Gupta, and Werdie van Staden. However, we are equally grateful to have our new cohort of Senior editors, Awais Aftab, Anna Bergqvist, Derek Strijbos, and Michael Wong, revitalize our efforts. Many of you already know our efficient and capable Managing Editor, Sébastien Arviset, who has been with us for (...)
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  25. Defending Social Objectivity for "Mental Disorder".Anne-Marie Gagné-Julien - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):381-384.
    First, I want to thank PPP for the privilege of having my work read and commented on by esteemed colleagues. In this response, I briefly review some of the key issues that they have raised. These issues include 1) the usefulness of a definition of mental disorder for North American psychiatry, 2) the absence of a concrete criterion to address the demarcation problem, 3) the place and role of values in such a demarcation, and 4) the worries of over-inclusiveness, problematic (...)
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  26. A Universal Definition of Mental Disorder: Neither Necessary nor Desirable.G. Scott Waterman - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):377-379.
    Psychiatry's relation to the rest of medicine is ambivalent. Its legitimacy as a specialty is often conceived as being closely linked to its fidelity to the fundamental paradigms of medicine, especially the centrality of diagnosis and the association of diagnosis with treatment indications. However, as Gagné-Julien notes, a major impetus behind the quest for a solution to the demarcation problem in psychiatry is "growing concerns regarding over-medicalization". Although it could appear that these two considerations point in opposite directions, both arguably (...)
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  27. Dysfunction and the Definition of Mental Disorder in the DSM.Anne-Marie Gagné-Julien - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):353-370.
  28. Psychological Injury is Not New and Not Normal.Claire Pouncey - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):347-348.
    In "On the Concept of 'Psychiatric Disorder,'" Miriam Solomon strives to resolve the tension between thinking of bereavement as a normal reaction to loss, and recognizing that its most extreme forms look very much like major depressive episodes and benefit from psychiatric treatment. To do this, she introduces the idea that a condition can be both normal and a mental disorder, or in other words, that some mental disorders are normal. Although I very much like the idea that some mental (...)
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  29. Who Owns the Concept of Psychiatric Disorder?Miriam Solomon - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):349-351.
    About ten years ago, I participated in a consensus process on migraine nomenclature. Participants used a modified Delphi technique to explore their views about what migraine is. Candidate concepts included an illness, disease, syndrome, condition, disorder, or susceptibility. Initially, there was a wide range of views about which concept best fits our concept of migraine. Migraine—in common with many psychiatric disorders—is poorly understood by neuroscience. On scientific grounds, participants thought that "susceptibility" and "syndrome" describes our current knowledge well. However, participants (...)
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  30. On the Concept of "Psychiatric Disorder": Incorporating Psychological Injury.Miriam Solomon - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):329-339.
  31. Can One and the Same Instance of Grief Be Both Normal and Disordered?Jerome C. Wakefield - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):341-346.
    Miriam solomon resuscitates a famous proposal of George Engel's to classify normal grief as a medical disorder. She has two main arguments justifying such a reclassification, one based on Engel's "wound analogy" and another a "Humpty Dumpty"-type argument that 'disorder' is a technical term that we can redefine any way we please. I consider them in turn.Solomon says: "I suggest that we allow a concept of "psychological injury" that is analogous to the concept of physical injury." Of course, we already (...)
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  32. The Limits of Community for A Theory of Recognition.Audra L. Goodnight - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):319-322.
    Should madness be recognized as grounds for identity? Should society recognize and validate madness as diversity, be it psychological, behavioral, or emotional? To answer these questions, we might turn to medical consensus about which mental, behavioral, or emotional states count as mental illness. Unfortunately, the criteria for determining which mental health phenomena fall within the boundary of mental illness remain open to debate, creating what is known as "the boundary problem." Common approaches to resolving the boundary problem include naturalism, a (...)
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  33. Recognition and Identity: Abstract Concepts, Concrete Struggles.Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):323-328.
    Political activity on the basis of a shared identity has been with us for several decades. Race, sexual orientation, gender, and myriad other categories form the center-of-gravity around which social groups demand recognition of the validity and value of their self-understandings. How should social and political institutions respond to these demands? In contemporary social and political philosophy much of the weight of answering this question has fallen on developing a theory of recognition. That theory would then perform several functions: It (...)
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  34. Values Constitute the Boundaries in Between the Rules of Nature and Social Recognition.Werdie van Staden - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):315-317.
    The boundary problem on defining the conceptual scope and limits of a mental disorder may be tackled at either side of the boundary. On one side, philosophers and philosophically minded clinicians tried clarifying the concept of mental disorder and its related concepts of mental illness and dysfunction in their use and definition. On the other side, Mohammed Rashed's article gives a substantive and refreshing account of this neglected side in terms of social recognition. Thereby the boundary is clarified from the (...)
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  35. An Approach to the Boundary Problem: Mental Health Activism and the Limits of Recognition.Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):297-313.
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  36. Louis Charland: 1958–2021.Peter Zachar & Jennifer Radden - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):295-296.
    A professor of philosophy at Western University in Ontario, with joint appointments in Philosophy and the School of Health Studies, Louis Charland unexpectedly passed away on May 9, 2021. In addition to Western, he taught at the Universities of Toronto, McGill, and Concordia. He had visiting appointments at Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for the History of Emotion in Perth, and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development in Berlin. Beyond his teaching (...)
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  37. Osborne P. Wiggins, Jr., PhD, 1943–2021.John Z. Sadler - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (4):291-293.
    Friends, family, and the Association of the Advancement of Philosophy and Psychiatry community mourn the death of Osborne "Ozzie" Wiggins this past May 18. In many ways, his story contributes a large portion to the founding of the AAPP, this journal, and the philosophy/psychiatry community worldwide.I met Professor Wiggins as a sophomore at Southern Methodist University in Dallas in 1974. I was a student in his twentieth-century humanities class. I didn't know at the time that he was in his early (...)
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  38. Wrongful Medicalization and Epistemic Injustice in Psychiatry: The Case of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder.Anne-Marie Gagné-Julien - 2021 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 17 (2):(S4)5-36.
    In this paper, my goal is to use an epistemic injustice framework to extend an existing normative analysis of over-medicalization to psychiatry and thus draw attention to overlooked injustices. Kaczmarek has developed a promising bioethical and pragmatic approach to over-medicalization, which consists of four guiding questions covering issues related to the harms and benefits of medicalization. In a nutshell, if we answer “yes” to all proposed questions, then it is a case of over-medicalization. Building on an epistemic injustice framework, I (...)
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  39. Medicine’s Metaphysical Morass: How Confusion About Dualism Threatens Public Health.Diane O’Leary - 2020 - Synthese 2020 (December):1977-2005.
    What position on dualism does medicine require? Our understanding of that ques- tion has been dictated by holism, as defined by the biopsychosocial model, since the late twentieth century. Unfortunately, holism was characterized at the start with con- fused definitions of ‘dualism’ and ‘reductionism’, and that problem has led to a deep, unrecognized conceptual split in the medical professions. Some insist that holism is a nonreductionist approach that aligns with some form of dualism, while others insist it’s a reductionist view (...)
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  40. Methodological Dualism Considered as a Heuristic Paradigm for Clinical Psychiatry.Tuomas K. Pernu - forthcoming - BJPsych Advances.
    Debates on dualism continue to plague psychiatry. I suggest that these debates are based on false dichotomies. According to metaphysical physicalism, reality is ultimately physical. Although this view excludes the idea of entities distinct from physical reality, it does not compel us to favour neural over psychological interventions. According to methodological dualism, both physical and mental interventions on the world can be deemed effective, and both perspectives can therefore be thought to be equally ‘real’.
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  41. Problems of Living Meaningfully in Psychiatry and Philosophy.Thaddeus Metz - 2022 - Brazilian Journal of Psychiatry 44 (3).
    A brief critical notice of Dan J Stein's new book _Problems of Living: Perspectives from Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Cognitive-Affective Science_.
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  42. Born which Way? ADHD, Situational Self-Control, and Responsibility.Polaris Koi - 2021 - Neuroethics 14 (2):205-218.
    Debates concerning whether Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder mitigates responsibility often involve recourse to its genetic and neurodevelopmental etiology. For such arguments, individuals with ADHD have diminished self-control, and hence do not fully satisfy the control condition for responsibility, when there is a genetic or neurodevelopmental etiology for this diminished capacity. In this article, I argue that the role of genetic and neurobiological explanations has been overstated in evaluations of responsibility. While ADHD has genetic and neurobiological causes, rather than embrace the essentialistic (...)
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  43. Anorexia Nervosa: Illusion in the Sense of Agency (2022).Amanda Evans - forthcoming - Mind and Language.
    This is a preprint draft. Please cite published version (DOI: 10.1111/mila.12385). The aim of this paper is to provide a novel analysis of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the context of the sense of agency literature. I first show that two accounts of anorexia nervosa that we ought to take seriously— i.e., the first personal reports of those who have experienced it firsthand as well as the research that seeks to explain anorexic behavior from an empirical perspective— appear to be thoroughly (...)
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  44. A Measure of Philosophical Distance.Bhrigupati Singh - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):285-287.
    How is conceptual foreignness received within an existing territory? I am grateful to my respondents for receiving my invocation of foreignness from phenomenological psychopathology not as a question of culture or nationality but rather, in terms of philosophical distance. As I ask in the article: how do we measure philosophical distance? Rather than complete agreement, or assimilation, or estrangement, perhaps distance is best calibrated through the small events of thought–understandings, misunderstandings, and clarifications, that punctuate even the most thoughtful and hospitable (...)
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  45. Schizophrenia, the Uncanny, and the Fragility of Ordinary Life.Emily Hughes - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):281-283.
    Schizophrenia involves significant disturbances to inter-subjective experience, the complex nature of which have become an increasingly important area for research in the philosophy of psychiatry. In “Schizophrenia as a Problem of Other Minds,”, Brighupati Singh offers a thought-provoking contribution to this trajectory by engaging Stanley Cavell’s idea of skepticism: the recognition that ordinary life is inherently fragile, and that the affective attunement between self and other is something that can be undone. Through detailed ethnographic and literary studies, primarily undertaken in (...)
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  46. The Phenomenology of Psychosis: Considerations for the Future.Zeno Van Duppen & Jasper Feyaerts - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):277-279.
    Over the past years, the intersubjective dimension of psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia, has gained increasing phenomenological attention. Psychopathologists and philosophers have developed ideas on how the social aspects of psychotic symptoms and experiences could be understood, in particular in their relation to the ipseity disturbance model, namely the idea that schizophrenia is essentially a disorder of the minimal self. Although the exact characteristics of the ipseity disorder hypothesis can differ from author to author, emphasizing certain phenomenological aspects like temporality or (...)
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  47. Schizophrenia as a Problem of Other Minds.Bhrigupati Singh - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):259-275.
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  48. Theories of Psychosis Versus: What It Is Like.Sofia Jeppsson - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):257-258.
    My response to Rashed's critique of my account as theorizing instead of showing what it is like.
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  49. Asking the Right Questions on Psychosis and Intelligibility.Mohammed Abouelleil Rashed - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):255-256.
    The challenge of understanding psychotic phenomena is one of the enduring problems in the philosophy of psychiatry. The first to formulate the problem in its philosophical dimension was Karl Jaspers in General Psycho-pathology. Jasper’s solution was rather pessimistic, for he argued that we cannot extend empathic understanding to certain phenomena, such as primary delusions. His work was followed by a long period of philosophical silence on the issue, and it was only three decades ago that philosophy began to engage once (...)
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  50. Striving to Make Sense: The Duty of Respect for Persons with Psychosis.Jeanette Kennett - 2021 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 28 (3):251-253.
    In her wonderfully rich and insightful article, Sofia Jeppsson argues that, although a person with psychosis may seem to be strange and unintelligible to us, we nevertheless have duties of intelligibility toward them. And she draws upon her own experience to show that psychotic experiences and reasoning are more intelligible than we might have thought.In this brief commentary, I focus on why the assumption of hypothetical intelligibility is a duty of respect owed to those experiencing psychosis. In everyday human interaction (...)
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