About this topic
Summary

The Philosophy in Schools leaf of PhilPapers focuses on academic publications and research content that centres on philosophy as a practice in, for and about schools.  Philosophy for/ with Children (P4/wC) as a theory, method, and approach are in the main the preoccupation of such focus.  Emanating out of the seminal work of Matthew Lipman and Anne Margaret Sharpe at Montclaire University, United States, Philosophy for/with Children over a scan of plus four decades has come to include a body of scholarship from across the world that has traversed in several noted directions.  This body of scholarship particularly homes in on the contributions, complexities and contradictions explored and tested on P4/wC as a tool for engaging thoughtfully in and for schooling both explicitly and implicitly.  The Philosophy in Schools category includes papers on work with/by teachers in- and pre-service and in school learners.  Aspects of research and practice collectively and singularly around the use of P4/wC in teacher education and training that involves philosophy in schools as theoretical or conceptual frameworks, methodological and empirical practice and or reviewed in literature are welcome.  This leaf should avoid papers on Philosophy of Education which has its own category on this website.   Papers on Philosophy in Schools that focus on the theory, practice, curriculum implementation and research endeavours of authors are herein found.

Related categories

152 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 152
  1. What Philosophers Say About Philosophy.Ulrich De Balbian - manuscript
    Hundreds of short, one sentence descriptions of what famous philosophers say philosophy is or is about. Useful for children, pupils, interested in philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. A Snapshot of Educational Research in 2019.Anh-Duc Hoang - manuscript
    2019 is a year witnessing the explosion of many high-tech applications in learning and teaching with integrated multimedia technologies (virtual reality - VR, augmented reality - AR), group and team collaboration technology, class organization, class management, and school ... It is indisputable that the application of new technology generates more interest in the learning and collaboration process. However, we are seemingly fraught with intractable problems within the transformation of a VUCA world (volatility - fragility, uncertainty, uncertainty, complexity - complexity, ambiguity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Afterword to Relational Odyssey.Don Michael Hudson - unknown - Afterword to Relational Odyssey:171.
    "Everything is a pretext for a good dinner.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Living by Story.Don Michael Hudson - unknown - Foundations A New Series:36-37.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. "And What of Beauty?" Compassionate Lifestyle.Don Michael Hudson - unknown - Sojourners (NA):42-46.
    We lose something central to our humanity when we divide our world into neat little packages of sacred and secular.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Re-Envisioning the Philosophy Classroom Through Metaphors.Alejandro Arango & Maria Howard - 2021 - Teaching Philosophy 44 (2):121-144.
    What is a philosophy class like? What roles do teachers and students play? Questions like these have been answered time and again by philosophers using images and metaphors. As philosophers continue to develop pedagogical approaches in a more conscious way, it is worth evaluating traditional metaphors used to understand and structure philosophy classes. In this article, we examine two common metaphors—the sage on the stage, and philosophy as combat—and show why they fail pedagogically. Then we propose five metaphors—teaching philosophy as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Narrow-Sense and Wide-Sense Community of Inquiry: What It Means for Teachers.Gilbert Burgh - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (1):12-26.
    In this paper, I introduce the narrow-sense and wide-sense conceptions of the community of inquiry (Sprod, 2001) as a way of understanding what is meant by the phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry.’ The wide-sense conception is the organising or regulative principle of scholarly communities of inquiry and a classroom-wide ideal for the reconstruction of education. I argue that converting the classroom into a community of inquiry requires more than following a specific procedural method, and, therefore, that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Teaching Democracy in an Age of Uncertainty: Place-Responsive Learning.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2021 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    The strength of democracy lies in its ability to self-correct, to solve problems and adapt to new challenges. However, increased volatility, resulting from multiple crises on multiple fronts – humanitarian, financial, and environmental – is testing this ability. By offering a new framework for democratic education, Teaching Democracy in an Age of Uncertainty begins a dialogue with education professionals towards the reconstruction of education and by extension our social, cultural and political institutions. -/- This book is the first monograph on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Sebastian Luft: Philosophie lehren - ein Buch zur philosophischen Hoschuldidaktik. [REVIEW]Moritz Cordes & Victoria Oertel - 2021 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 75:171-175.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning on Secondary Students’ Achievement in Science: A Meta-Analysis.Aaron Funa & Maricar Prudente - 2021 - International Journal of Instruction 14 (4):69-84.
    Preparing students for the real challenges in life is one of the most important goals in education. Constructivism is an approach that uses real-life experiences to construct knowledge. Problem-Based Learning (PBL), for almost five decades now, has been the most innovative constructivist pedagogy used worldwide. However, with the rising popularity, there is a need to revisit empirical studies regarding PBL to serve as a guide and basis for designing new studies, making institutional policies, and evaluating educational curricula. This need has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Educational Value of Analytic Philosophy.Jane Gatley - 2021 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 7 (1):59-77.
    In this article, I outline three critiques of analytic philosophy; that it is irrelevant to individuals and society; unconstructive; and excessively technical. These critiques are linked to skepticism about the educational value of analytic philosophy. In response, I suggest that if analytic philosophy provides constructive guidance about prominent and pressing questions, then it holds potential educational value. I identify a body of prominent and pressing questions that are addressed by analytic philosophy as a discipline. Because analytic philosophy is often concerned (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Philosophy for Children and Logic-Based Therapy.Christos Georgakakis - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):53-70.
    This article aims to shed light on the interconnectedness between two important projects in applied philosophy: (a) Philosophy for Children (P4C), a movement for the introduction of philosophy in schools, and (b) Logic-based Therapy and Consultation (LBTC), a widely developed form of philosophical counselling. More specifically, it attempts to show how Michael Hand’s (2018) argument in favour of P4C can fruitfully be enhanced by the endorsement of fundamental theoretical assumptions of Elliot Cohen’s (2005, 2019) LBTC. Hand argues that philosophy should (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Gareth B. Matthews, The Child's Philosopher.Maughn Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2021 - London, New York: Routledge.
    Gareth B. Matthews, The Child’s Philosopher brings together groundbreaking essays by renowned American philosopher Gareth B. Matthews in three fields he helped to initiate: philosophy in children’s literature, philosophy for children, and philosophy of childhood. In addition, contemporary scholars critically assess Matthews’ pioneering efforts and his legacy. Matthews (1929-2011) was a specialist in ancient and medieval philosophy who had conversations with young children, discovering that they delight in philosophical puzzlement and that their philosophical thinking often enriched his own understanding. Those (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Sie sind Fake News! Ein analytischer Zugang für die Politische Bildung.Manuel S. Hubacher - 2021 - In Manuel S. Hubacher & Monika Waldis (eds.), Politische Bildung für die digitale Öffentlichkeit: Umgang mit politischer Information und Kommunikation in digitalen Räumen. Wiesbaden, Deutschland: Springer. pp. 153-173.
    Dieser Beitrag greift das Phänomen Fake News auf und plädiert für einen analytischen Zugang zur Thematik. Zunächst grenzt er den Begriff der Fake News von anderen Phänomenen ab. Er zeigt auf, dass der Begriff nicht nur keinen analytischen Mehrwert bietet, sondern dass er die eigentlichen Probleme verschleiert und als Propagandabegriff u.a. Verwendung findet, um Zensur zu rechtfertigen und die Gegenseite zu delegitimieren. Trotzdem sollte die Politische Bildung nicht vollkommen auf den Begriff verzichten. Versteht man Fake News als einen fließenden Signifikant (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Facilitator as Self-Liberator and Enabler: Ethical Responsibility in Communities of Philosophical Inquiry.Arie Kizel - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:1-20.
    From its inception, philosophy for/with children (P4wC) has sought to promote philosophical discussion with children based on the latter’s own questions and a pedagogic method designed to encourage critical, creative, and caring thinking. Communities of inquiry can be plagued by power struggles prompted by diverse identities, however. These not always being highlighted in the literature or P4wC discourse, this article proposes a two-stage model for facilitators as part of their ethical responsibility. In the first phase, they should free themselves from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Wie sollten Lehrende mit Fake News und Verschwörungstheorien im Unterricht umgehen?David Lanius - 2021 - In Johannes Drerup, Miguel Zulaica Y. Mugica & Douglas Yacek (eds.), Dürfen Lehrer ihre Meinung sagen? Demokratische Bildung und die Kontroverse über Kontroversitätsgebote. Stuttgart, Deutschland: pp. 188-208.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Sobre os sentidos e os lugares interdisciplinares da Filosofia.G. D. Secco & Priscilla Tesch Spinelli - 2021 - Anais Do I Encontro de Filosofia E Ensino Do Rio Grande Do Sul.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Transaction or Transformation: Why Do Philosophy in Prisons?Mog Stapleton & Dave Ward - 2021 - Journal of Prison Education and Reentry 7 (2):214-226.
    Why do public philosophy in prisons? When we think about the value and aims of public philosophy there is a well-entrenched tendency to think in transactional terms. The academy has something of value that it aims to pass on or transmit to its clients. Usually, this transaction takes place within the confines of the university, in the form of transmission of valuable skills or knowledge passed from faculty to students. Public philosophy, construed within this transactional mindset, then consists in passing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Does Developing Moral Thinking Skills Lead to Moral Action? Developing Moral Proprioception.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Practice.
    This paper explores the relationship between thinking and acting morally. Can we transfer critical thinking skills to real life situations? Philosophical practice with clients as well as with school children creates a context for not only being a critical and reflective thinker but also a self -critical thinker and self -reflective thinker. In his book On Dialogue, David Bohm explores the notion of proprioception of thinking; focusing on thinking as a movement. The tacit, concrete process of thinking informs our actions (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Mit Philosophie die Welt verändern. In Bildung und Öffentlichkeit.Georg Brun & Claus Beisbart (eds.) - 2020 - Basle: Schwabe.
    Philosophie kann dazu beitragen, dass wir vernünftiger mit den Problemen umgehen, die unsere Gesellschaft und ihr Selbstverständnis herausfordern. Dazu muss die Philosophie sich aber öffentlich einmischen und verstärkt in die Bildung Einzug halten – diese Position vertritt vorliegender Band. Die Beiträge von Anne Burkard, Rainer Hegselmann, Romy Jaster und Markus Wild zeigen einerseits auf, welche Rolle die Philosophie in öffentlichen Debatten spielen kann und soll. Andererseits analysieren sie, welchen Beitrag Philosophie zur schulischen und universitären Bildung liefert.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Durch philosophische Bildung die Welt verbessern?Anne Burkard - 2020 - In Georg Brun & Claus Beisbart (eds.), Mit Philosophie die Welt verändern. Schwabe. pp. 59-100.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. PROPOSITIONAL KNOWLEDGE IN HIGH SCHOOL PHILOSOPHY CLASSES: BETWEEN DIDACTIC AND TEACHING.Jean Caldas - 2020 - Thaumàzein 13 (25):47 - 56.
    In this paper, I argue that knowledge of philosophical propositions can and should perform a role as regulative ideal in high school philosophy classes. Roughly speaking, I think that there are two kinds of knowledge assumed in high school philosophy classes: the first, which, for convenience, I shall call philosophical dispositional knowledge, and the philosophical propositional knowledge. The first one consists in the knowledge that takes into account only certain philosophical skills such as thesis identification, argument identification etc. The second (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Broad Nature and Importance of Public Philosophy.Brian J. Collins - 2020 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 2:72-87.
    Many professional philosophers are hesitant about “public philosophy”—unsure about what it is and how it’s done, and downright pessimistic about whether it is an important and valuable philosophical practice. In response to this hesitancy and in support of public philosophy, I argue that most of these philosophers already find at least one form of public philosophy important and valuable for the discipline and profession: teaching. I offer and defend a broad conception of public philosophy in order support this controversial claim. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Resisting the 'View From Nowhere': Positionality in Philosophy for/with Children Research.Peter Paul Elicor - 2020 - Philosophia International Journal of Philosophy (Philippines) 1 (21):10-33.
    While Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC) provides a better alternative to the usual ‘banking’ model of education, questions have been raised regarding its applicability in non-western contexts. Despite its adherence to the ideals of democratic dialogue, not all members of a Community of Inquiry (COI) will be disposed to participate in the inquiry, not because they are incapable of doing so, but because they are positioned inferiorly within the group thereby affecting their efforts to speak out on topics that are meaningful (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Mapping Identity Prejudice: Locations of Epistemic Injustice in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Ejera Elicor - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (1):1-25.
    This article aims to map the locations of identity prejudice that occurs in the context of a Community of Inquiry. My claim is that epistemic injustice, which usually originates from seemingly ‘minor’ cases of identity prejudice, can potentially leak into the actual practice of P4wC. Drawing from Fricker, the various forms of epistemic injustice are made explicit when epistemic practices are framed within concrete social circumstances where power, privilege and authority intersect, which is observable in school settings. In connection, despite (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Youth Philosophy Conferences and the Development of Adolescent Social Skills.Jane Gatley, Elliott Woodhouse & Joshua Forstenzer - 2020 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 1 (2):107-125.
    In this paper we present an empirical case study into the effects of attending a philosophy conference on social skill development in 15- to 18-year-old students. We focus on the impact that the conference had on their communication skills, sociability, cooperation and teamwork skills, self-confidence, determination, social responsibility, and empathy. These are social skills previously studied in 2017 by Siddiqui et al. who found student development in these areas as a result of Philosophy for Children (P4C) sessions in primary schools. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. The Privilege of Boredom: How Philosophy Can Happen in Isolation.Anil Gomes - 2020 - TLS.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Directing Moral Inquiry: A Rejoinder to Cam, Sowey, Lockrobin, Splitter, Sprod and Knight.Michael Hand - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (2).
    In this rejoinder to the foregoing responses to my article ‘Moral education in the community of inquiry’, I address what I take to be the four most fundamental objections to my proposed expansion of the community of inquiry (CoI) method. My proposal is that we make room in the CoI for directive teaching of moral standards we know to be justified or unjustified, in addition to nondirective teaching of moral standards whose justificatory status is unknown. The four objections I consider (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Was kann die Philosophie wirklich? Philosophinnen und Philosophen in einer demokratischen Gesellschaft.Rainer Hegselmann - 2020 - In Georg Brun & Claus Beisbart (eds.), Mit Philosophie die Welt verändern. Basel: Schwabe. pp. 11-57.
  30. Mehr Öffentlichkeit wagen. Wie(so) über Wahrheit reden?Romy Jaster - 2020 - In Georg Brun & Claus Beisbart (eds.), Mit Philosophie die Welt verändern. Basel: Schwabe. pp. 135-175.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Can Schools Teach Citizenship?Michael Merry - 2020 - Discourse 41 (1):124-138.
    In this essay I question the liberal faith in the efficacy and morality of citizenship education (CE) as it has been traditionally (and is still) practiced in most public state schools. In challenging institutionalized faith in CE, I also challenge liberal understandings of what it means to be a citizen, and how the social and political world of citizens is constituted. I interrogate CE as defended in the liberal tradition, with particular attention to Gutmann’s ‘conscious social reproduction’. I argue that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. What Can Philosophy Learn From Improvisational Theater?Erica Preston-Roedder - 2020 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 2:18-35.
    Can we learn about philosophical practice, and philosophical teaching, by examining an apparently very different discipline—improvisational theater? The short answer: yes! In particular, a consideration of improvisational theater reveals four values—play/playfulness, physicality, ensemble, and inclusivity—all of which have a role in philosophical practice and pedagogy. First, we can think of philosophy as a form of intellectual play, where theatrical techniques demonstrate that play can deepen the focus of our students. Second, philosophical teaching can be done in ways that productively utilize (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Philosophy and the Curriculum.Monica Bini, Alan Tapper, Peter Ellerton, Stephan John Millett & Sue Knight - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 156-171.
    Philosophy in schools in Australia dates back to the 1980s and is rooted in the Philosophy for Children curriculum and pedagogy. Seeing potential for educational change, Australian advocates were quick to develop new classroom resources and innovative programs that have proved influential in educational practice throughout Australia and internationally. Behind their contributions lie key philosophical and educational discussions and controversies which have shaped attempts to introduce philosophy in schools and embed it in state and national curricula. Drawing together a wide (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The Development of an Inquiring Society in Australia.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.) - 2019 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    Philosophy in schools in Australia dates back to the 1980s and is rooted in the Philosophy for Children curriculum and pedagogy. Seeing potential for educational change, Australian advocates were quick to develop new classroom resources and innovative programs that have proved influential in educational practice throughout Australia and internationally. Behind their contributions lie key philosophical and educational discussions and controversies which have shaped attempts to introduce philosophy in schools and embed it in state and national curricula. -/- Drawing together a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. The Philosophical Classroom: An Australian Story.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 1-5.
  36. Ecosocial Citizenship Education: Facilitating Interconnective, Deliberative Practice and Corrective Methodology for Epistemic Accountability.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-20.
    According to Val Plumwood (1995), liberal-democracy is an authoritarian political system that protects privilege but fails to protect nature. A major obstacle, she says, is radical inequality, which has become increasingly far-reaching under liberal-democracy; an indicator of ‘the capacity of its privileged groups to distribute social goods upwards and to create rigidities which hinder the democratic correctiveness of social institutions’ (p. 134). This cautionary tale has repercussions for education, especially civics and citizenship education. To address this, we explore the potential (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Philosophy in Higher Education: A Study of J. H. Newman’s The Idea of a University.Marial Corona - 2019 - Madrid, Spain: Apeiron Ediciones.
    The current state of Universities and proposals for its future inspire dozens of books and articles every year, and Newman’s Idea of a University, although not a guidebook, continues to be a source of reflection for many after 150 years. In this dissertation, articulated in four chapters, the author explores Newman’s Idea paying special attention to his understanding of philosophy and the role he gives it in University education. Particular highlights of this work are the analysis of the fundamental building (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. O Ensino De Filosofia como Problema Filosófico: revendo Alejandro Cerletti.Sandro Rinaldi Feliciano - 2019 - In Fabio Gabriel (ed.), Filosofia, Educação e Ensino: perspectivas contemporâneas. Curitiba, PR, Brasil: Editora Multifoco. pp. 13-33.
    O ensino de filosofia é hoje feito de diversas formas (práticas), sendo as três principais (ou bases), a histórica, a temática e a criação conceitual. No entanto parece muito mais plausível e até saudável uma combinação entre duas destas formas, ou até as três, mas isto não elimina a problemática das perguntas: "qual é a melhor forma?", ou "qual é a mais certa?" ou ainda "qual é a mais eficaz ou a mais eficiente?", na medida em que estas combinações em (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Existentially Dope.Devon Johnson - 2019 - The Philosophers' Magazine 86:36-43.
  40. Bringing Undergraduates to Preschool: An Ethics Course for the Very Young.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - In Thomas E. Wartenberg (ed.), Philosophy in Classrooms and Beyond: New Approaches to Picture-Book Philosophy. pp. 1-16.
  41. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Walter Omar Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a problem with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Dialogic Listening: How Music May Help Us Become Better Philosophers.Pablo Muruzábal Lamberti - 2019 - Praxis y Saber 23 (10):253-272.
    This paper is about dialogic listening as a precondition for meaningful engagement in Socratic dialogues and for music. In order to arrive at a better understanding of what constitutes dialogic listening in the context of educational philosophical dialogues, I first shed light on the practice of philosophy teaching based on Nelson & Heckmann’s neo-Socratic paradigm and link this practice to Plato’s dialogues. I then argue that the activity of listening to an interlocutor during Socratic dialogues on the one hand, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Australian Research Into the Benefits of Philosophy for Children.Stephan John Millett - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 199-214.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Australian Research Into the Benefits of Philosophy for Children.Stephan John Millett, Alan Tapper & Rosie Scholl - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 199-214.
  45. Rethinking Consensus in the Community of Philosophical Inquiry: A Research Agenda.Kei Nishiyama - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:83-97.
    In Philosophy for Children (P4C), consensus-making is often regarded as something that needs to be avoided. P4C scholars believe that consensus-making would dismiss P4C’s ideals, such as freedom, inclusiveness, and diversity. This paper aims to counteract such assumptions, arguing that P4C scholars tend to focus on a narrow, or universal, concept of “consensus” and dismiss various forms of consensus, especially what Niemeyer and Dryzek (2007) call meta-consensus. Meta-consensus does not search for universal consensus, but focuses on the process by which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Making a Circle: Building a Community of Philosophical Enquiry in a Post-Apartheid, Government School in South Africa.Rose-Anne Reynolds - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15 (1):203-221.
    In this paper I attempt to trace an entanglement of an event documented in my PhD research which contests dominant modes of enquiry. It is experimental research which resists the human subject as the most important aspect of research, the only one with agency or intentionality. In particular, I analyse the process of the making of the circle, and how integral it is in contributing to building the Community of Enquiry, the pedagogy of Philosophy with Children. I offer a critical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Growing Up with Philosophy in Australia: Philosophy as Cultural Discourse.Simone Thornton & Gilbert Burgh - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 236‒249.
    As the purpose of this book is to open dialogue, we draw no conclusions. Instead, reflecting on the theoretical and practical implications that arise from each chapter, we offer some reflection through an exploration of the ways in which Australia has broadened discussions on P4C. In addition, we situate our discussion in contemporary global issues relevant to education and schooling: gender stereotyping, bias and language; Aboriginal philosophy; environmental education; and sexuality, adolescence and discrimination. As a community of children, adolescents and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  48. Examples of Aporia Questions Using Picture Books.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Blog of the APA.
    The intuitive mind is a sacred gift and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift. – Albert Einstein -/- In my philosophical discussions with elementary school children, I use questions not just to uncover hidden assumptions the children may have, but to lead them to a place of aporia – puzzlement, a place of “not-knowing.” If some children assume that to be brave is to be fearless, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Application of Proprioception to Doing Philosophy with Children.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Социум И Власть 4 (78):62-68.
    This paper focuses on creating a paradigm shift; looking at how philosophy for and with children can inform philosophy, instead of having philosophy inform philosophy for and with children. My work in doing philosophy with children has shown me the limitations to trying to understand their way of doing philosophy through the lens of how adults understand philosophy and the influence western philosophy has had on the perception of what kids do when they are involved in philosophical group discussions. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Teaching Critical Thinking and Metacognitive Skills Through Philosophical Enquiry. A Practitioner's Report on Experiments in the Classroom.Emma Worley & Peter Worley - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15.
    Although expert consensus states that critical thinking (CT) is essential to enquiry, it doesn’t necessarily follow that by practicing enquiry children are developing CT skills. Philosophy with children programmes around the world aim to develop CT dispositions and skills through a community of enquiry, and this study compared the impact of the explicit teaching of CT skills during an enquiry, to The Philosophy Foundation's philosophical enquiry (PhiE) method alone (which had no explicit teaching of CT skills). Philosophy with children is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 152