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This leaf category contains articles relating ethics to philosophy for children, which may include both works concerning philosophical dialogues with children about ethical questions and works on the ethics of philosophical dialogues with children. Philosophy for Children is here understood as a (family of) method(s) on how to support children (and others) in talking about philosophy, as well as (a) theory(/ies) about why. Works within the field may concern both the how and the why: both descriptions of how one successfully goes about facilitating such dialogues, and theoretical as well as empirical investigations of the question of why we ought to do so, which may include studies on the effects on participants, but also philosophical investigations into the value of philosophizing (together). Works in this category need not be limited to concerning children specifically, as the area that is often labelled ”philosophy for children” (P4C) has expanded to include philosophical dialogues with other groups  outside of academia as well, such as adults with disabilities, or the elderly. This category also covers works concerning similar but slightly different methodologies from P4C, for example philosophy with children (PwC), community of philosophical inquiry (CoPI), philosophical dialogues, socratic dialogues, etc., as long as they concern ethics. Other sibling categories, sorting under the parent category ”Philosophy for Children”, deal with other aspects of the field, and help further explain the field. Works that are rather concerned with the ethics of childhood, family ethics, or the philosophy of childhood, etc., are sorted under other categories, and readers and authors may well want to check these out. See, for example, “Family ethics”, “Reproducive ethics”, “Genetic ethics”, “Ethics of Childhood” and ”Childhood”. 

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  1. Rethinking teacher preparation for teaching controversial topics in a community of inquiry.Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh, Jennifer Bleazby & Mary Graham - 2023 - In Arie Kizel (ed.), Philosophy with children and teacher education: Global perspectives on critical, creative and caring thinking. Abingdon; New York: Routledge. pp. 194-203.
    Contemporary socio-political issues often seen as socially controversial and highly politicised topics, such as anthropogenic climate change, public scepticism over preventive public health measures during pandemics such as COVID-19, and Indigenous sovereignty, lands rights, and ways of knowing, being and doing, highlight the need for education to address such issues more effectively. Controversial issues do not exist in isolation. They are connected to questions of order, interpretation, meaning-making, ethics, and why and how we live, i.e., to philosophical questions. We argue (...)
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  2. Responding to climate change ‘controversy’ in schools: Philosophy for Children, place-responsive pedagogies & Critical Indigenous Pedagogy.Jennifer Bleazby, Simone Thornton, Gilbert Burgh & Mary Graham - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 55.
    Despite the scientific consensus, climate change continues to be socially and politically controversial. Consequently, teachers may worry about accusations of political indoctrination if they teach climate change in their classrooms. Research shows that many teachers are using the ‘teaching the controversy’ approach to teach climate change, essentially allowing students to make up their own mind about climate change. Drawing on some philosophical literature about indoctrination and controversial issues, we argue that such an approach is inappropriate and, given the escalating crisis (...)
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  3. Philosothons: Rewarding collaborative thinking.Danielle Diver - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):28-46.
    Competition, and its effect on educational environments, has been widely debated. On the one hand, it is argued that competition raises attainment and, on the other, it is said that whilst it may raise attainment for some, it exists at the expense of a supportive school environment. Should philosophy undertaken as a subject in schools, such as P4C, involve any level of competition if there is a chance of it raising performance? Scholars have argued that communities of inquiry within P4C (...)
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  4. Competition and its tendency to corrupt philosophy.Yvette Drissen - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (1):5-27.
    Competition plays a substantial and structural role in philosophy today. It is therefore remarkable that it has received little systematic ethical scrutiny in the literature until now. This paper aims to contribute to establishing a discussion about competition in the discipline of philosophy by arguing that philosophy is not inherently competitive and that competition tends to corrupt the practice of philosophy. Regarding, I argue that philosophy can best be understood as a cooperative endeavour. The idea that philosophy is a matter (...)
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  5. Daring a childlike writing: children for philosophy, moral end, and the childhood of conceptions.Walter Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2022 - In Dina Mendonça & Florian Franken Figueiredo (eds.), Conceptions of Childhood and Moral Education in Philosophy for Children. Metzler. pp. 57-78.
    A child arrives as a new world because in her and with her we feel that the whole world can start over. But that is not the only reason. A child also arrives as a new world because her arrival tells us what, being so simple, we had almost forgotten: that the world is not just old and unquestionable. The child doesn’t let us be indif-ferent; she breaks with conformity and arrives as hope, reeking of the unpredictable. Of questions. A (...)
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  6. Conceptions of Childhood and Moral Education in Philosophy for Children.Dina Mendonça & Florian Franken Figueiredo (eds.) - 2022 - Berlin: Springer Nature.
    Philosophy for Children has long been considered as crucial for children’s ethical and moral education and a decisive contribution for education for the democratic life. The book gathers contributions from experts in the field who reflect on fundamental issues on how childhood and ethics are interrelated within the P4C movement. The main interest of this volume is to offer an understanding of how different philosophical conceptions of childhood can be coordinated with different ethical and meta-ethical philosophical considerations in P4C addressing (...)
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  7. The case for philosophy for children in kenyan schools.Eliud Shani Ominde, Atieno Kili K'odhiambo & Samsom Okuro Gunga - 2022 - Childhood and Philosophy 18:01-17.
    The significance of value-based education in character development and inculcation of ethical citizenship attitudes in Kenyan schools cannot be overemphasized. In the recent past, cases of unethical behaviour among primary school-going children and those who have graduated from this important segment of education have been on the rise, despite the various interventions by the Kenyan government to integrate value concerns in the curriculum. Since 2020, there has been a sharp increase in the cases of student-led arsons in learning institutions in (...)
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  8. Cooperation and competition in the Philosothon.Alan Tapper & Matthew Wills - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):78-89.
    Philosothons are events in which students practise Community of Philosophical Inquiry, usually with awards being made using three criteria: critical thinking, creative thinking and collaboration. This seems to generate a tension. On the one hand it recognises collaboration as a valued trait; on the other hand, the element of competition may seem antithetical to collaboration. There are various possible considerations relevant to this apparent problem. We can pose them as seven questions. One, do the awards really recognise the best performers? (...)
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  9. The facilitator as self-liberator and enabler: ethical responsibility in communities of philosophical inquiry.Arie Kizel - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:1-20.
    From its inception, philosophy for/with children (P4wC) has sought to promote philosophical discussion with children based on the latter’s own questions and a pedagogic method designed to encourage critical, creative, and caring thinking. Communities of inquiry can be plagued by power struggles prompted by diverse identities, however. These not always being highlighted in the literature or P4wC discourse, this article proposes a two-stage model for facilitators as part of their ethical responsibility. In the first phase, they should free themselves from (...)
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  10. atrever-se a uma escrita infantil: a infância como abrigo e refúgio.Walter Omar Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17 (17):1-30.
    The present text is a childlike exercise in writing. In responding to an invitation to write an adult, academic text, we the authors found that the presence of a child's standpoint acted to change the expressions that were to be elucidated, and that the project that adult writing represents was suspended by the creative force of childhood. "Philosophy for children" became "children for philosophy"; "moral education" became "the end (of) morality" and "conceptions of childhood" became the "childhood of conceptions." As (...)
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  11. escritura infantil: niñas y niños para filosofía o la infancia como abrigo y refugio.Walter Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2021 - In Tópicos filosofía educación para el siglo XXI. 88: pp. 55.
    Este ha sido el mundo infantil – imposible y contradictorio – que sentimos habitar en este escrito, en esta escritura. En ese mundo, como ahora, el inicio y el final coinciden. En ese mundo, que Heráclito llamaría aión, es la infancia la que gobierna. Un gobierno infantil. Por lo tanto, es tiempo de callarnos. De estarnos sin tanta luz y sin tantas palabras. Para dormir y soñar. Es tiempo de terminar. O de comenzar. Los y las lectores infantiles (no) tienen (...)
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  12. Place-based philosophical education: Reconstructing ‘place’, reconstructing ethics.Simone Thornton, Mary Graham & Gilbert Burgh - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:1-29.
    Education as identity formation in Western-style liberal-democracies relies, in part, on neutrality as a justification for the reproduction of collective individual identity, including societal, cultural, institutional and political identities, many aspects of which are problematic in terms of the reproduction of environmentally harmful attitudes, beliefs and actions. Taking a position on an issue necessitates letting go of certain forms of neutrality, as does effectively teaching environmental education. We contend that to claim a stance of neutrality is to claim a position (...)
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  13. Does Developing Moral Thinking Skills lead to Moral Action? Developing Moral Proprioception.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2021 - International Journal of Philosophical Practice.
    This paper explores the relationship between thinking and acting morally. Can we transfer critical thinking skills to real life situations? Philosophical practice with clients as well as with school children creates a context for not only being a critical and reflective thinker but also a self -critical thinker and self -reflective thinker. In his book On Dialogue, David Bohm explores the notion of proprioception of thinking; focusing on thinking as a movement. The tacit, concrete process of thinking informs our actions (...)
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  14. Student and teacher outcomes from participating in a Philosophy for Children program: Volunteer ethics teachers’ perspectives.Gianni Zappalà & Ciara Smyth - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 8 (1):104-128.
    Despite the growth of philosophy for/with children over the last five decades, its legitimacy remains contested. Key themes within the P4C literature are the potential learning outcomes for children as well as possible personal and professional development benefits for those that teach it. The literature on the former, while extensive, presents a mixed picture and highlights the challenges inherent in determining the impact of P4C on learning outcomes. The literature on the latter, while little explored, may provide valuable insights for (...)
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  15. The Child’s Right to a Voice.David Archard & Suzanne Uniacke - 2020 - Res Publica 27 (4):521-536.
    This article provides a philosophical analysis of a putative right of the child to have their expressed views considered in matters that affect them. Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989 is an influential and interesting statement of that right. The article shows that the child’s ‘right to a voice’ is complex. Its complexity lies in the problem of contrasting an adult’s normative power of choice with a child’s weighted views, in the various (...)
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  16. Mapping Identity Prejudice: Locations of Epistemic Injustice in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Ejera Elicor - 2020 - Childhood and Philosophy 16 (1):1-25.
    This article aims to map the locations of identity prejudice that occurs in the context of a Community of Inquiry. My claim is that epistemic injustice, which usually originates from seemingly ‘minor’ cases of identity prejudice, can potentially leak into the actual practice of P4wC. Drawing from Fricker, the various forms of epistemic injustice are made explicit when epistemic practices are framed within concrete social circumstances where power, privilege and authority intersect, which is observable in school settings. In connection, despite (...)
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  17. Does philosophy kill culture?Susan T. Gardner & Jason Chen - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (1):4.
    Given that one of the major goals of the practice of Philosophy for Children (P4C) is the development of critical thinking skills (Sharp 1987/2018, pp. 4 6), an urgent question that emerged for one of the authors, who is of Chinese Heritage and a novice practitioner at a P4C summer camp was whether this emphasis on critical thinking might make this practice incompatible with the fabric of Chinese culture. Filial piety (孝), which requires respect for one’s parents, elders, and ancestors (...)
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  18. Youth Philosophy Conferences and the Development of Adolescent Social Skills.Jane Gatley, Elliott Woodhouse & Joshua Forstenzer - 2020 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 1 (2):107-125.
    In this paper we present an empirical case study into the effects of attending a philosophy conference on social skill development in 15- to 18-year-old students. We focus on the impact that the conference had on their communication skills, sociability, cooperation and teamwork skills, self-confidence, determination, social responsibility, and empathy. These are social skills previously studied in 2017 by Siddiqui et al. who found student development in these areas as a result of Philosophy for Children (P4C) sessions in primary schools. (...)
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  19. What Can Philosophy Learn from Improvisational Theater?Erica Preston-Roedder - 2020 - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice 2:18-35.
    Can we learn about philosophical practice, and philosophical teaching, by examining an apparently very different discipline—improvisational theater? The short answer: yes! In particular, a consideration of improvisational theater reveals four values—play/playfulness, physicality, ensemble, and inclusivity—all of which have a role in philosophical practice and pedagogy. First, we can think of philosophy as a form of intellectual play, where theatrical techniques demonstrate that play can deepen the focus of our students. Second, philosophical teaching can be done in ways that productively utilize (...)
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  20. Direction in a community of ethical inquiry.Tim Sprod - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (2).
    In response to Hand’s paper, I undertake three tasks. Firstly, I believe that his characterisation of the theory and practice of Community of Inquiry facilitation does not take account of approaches to indoctrination and the idea of philosophical self-effacement that can lessen his worries. Secondly, I will argue that Hand makes some sharp cuts—particularly between justified, controversial and unjustified moral standards—that do not stand up to scrutiny, and that he unnecessarily narrows the scope of moral inquiry. Finally, I will explore (...)
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  21. How Doing Philosophy with Children enhances Proprioception of Thinking and Emotional Intelligence.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2020 - Socium I Vlast’ 1 (81):90-95.
    The article is a more detailed consideration of the problems that were outlined in the first part of this study, “The Application of the Proprioception of Thinking in Doing Philosophy with Children” (Socium and Power, 2019, no. 4). This time, the author pays attention to the characterization of thinking as a process in the practice of philosophizing with children, justifying the effectiveness of this practice, which forms the awareness of actions and develops emotional intelligence. The author contrasts static abstract thinking (...)
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  22. Ethics for the Very Young: A Philosophy Curriculum for Early Childhood Education.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Can you be brave if you’re afraid? Why do we “know better” and do things anyway? What makes a family? Philosophers have wrestled with such questions for centuries. They are also the stuff of playground debates. Ethics for the Very Young uses the perplexities of young children’s lives to spark philosophical dialogue. Its lessons scaffold discussion through executive function games (Telephone, Red Light Green Light), dialogic reading of picture books and Reggio Emilia’s art-based inquiry. In the process, children develop skills (...)
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  23. Bringing Undergraduates to Preschool: An Ethics Course for the Very Young.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - In Thomas E. Wartenberg (ed.), Philosophy in Classrooms and Beyond: New Approaches to Picture-Book Philosophy. pp. 1-16.
  24. The influence of philosophy for children on japanese secondary school students’ socioemotional learning.Yoko Kitami - 2019 - Dissertation, University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa
    This study focused on the influence of philosophy for children on the socioemotional learning of Japanese middle school students. p4c is a student-centered learning approach that helps learners explore inquiry and encourage them to think and reason with peers and a teacher in a classroom setting. Previous research indicated that Japanese children rarely interacted with people other than their parents on a daily basis, and only within small cliques. As a result, they may be losing the ability to develop and (...)
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  25. Kizel, A. (2019) “Enabling Identity as an Ethical Tension in Community of Philosophical Inquiry with Children and Young Adults”. Global Studies of Childhood 9 (2) 145–155.Arie Kizel - 2019 - Global Studies of Childhood 2 (9):145–155.
    This paper will focus on an ethical tension in community of philosophical inquiry with children and young adults and the resolution that I suggest is called Enabling Identity. The model Enabling Identity seeks to endow a voice for children and adolescents from marginalized groups by challenging the mainstream hegemonic discourse that governs the discourse where communities of philosophical inquiry operate. One of the challenges Philosophy for Children (P4C) faces today is enabling the voices of marginalized groups represented within communities of (...)
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  26. Rethinking consensus in the community of philosophical inquiry: A research agenda.Kei Nishiyama - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:83-97.
    In Philosophy for Children (P4C), consensus-making is often regarded as something that needs to be avoided. P4C scholars believe that consensus-making would dismiss P4C’s ideals, such as freedom, inclusiveness, and diversity. This paper aims to counteract such assumptions, arguing that P4C scholars tend to focus on a narrow, or universal, concept of “consensus” and dismiss various forms of consensus, especially what Niemeyer and Dryzek (2007) call meta-consensus. Meta-consensus does not search for universal consensus, but focuses on the process by which (...)
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  27. A Skill-Based Framework for Teaching Morality and Religion.Jason D. Swartwood - 2019 - Teaching Ethics 18 (1):39-62.
    One important aim of moral philosophy courses is to help students build the skills necessary to make their own well-reasoned decisions about moral issues. This includes the skill of determining when a particular moral reason provides a good answer to a moral question or not. Helping students think critically about religious reasons like “because God says so” and “because scripture explicitly says so” can be challenging because such lessons can be misperceived as coercive or anti-religious. I describe a framework for (...)
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  28. Aporia and Picture Books.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 39 (2):11-22.
    Here is an example using a picture book story: A New House, in Grasshopper on the Road: by Arnold Lobel Grasshopper sees an apple on top of a hill and decides, yum! lunch, as he takes a big bite out of the apple. This, however, causes the apple to start rolling down the hill. Grasshopper hears a voice inside the apple, telling him to keep his house from being destroyed as it is rolling down the hill. My bathtub is in (...)
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  29. Socratic Wisdom & The Knowledge of Children.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Philosophy Now 131:27-29.
    Thinking together not only binds us, but also allows us to explore unknown, perhaps unknowable, territory with joy, curiosity and confidence. Through asking children what they in some sense already know through their intuitive knowledge and putting thinking itself into question, we can help them become more aware of themselves as thinking beings. And as thinking beings children can learn the skills they’re taught in school, but not at the expense of their own thinking. With their thinking intact, they can (...)
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  30. Racism as ‘Reasonableness’: Philosophy for Children and the Gated Community of Inquiry.Darren Chetty - 2018 - Ethics and Education 13 (1):39-54.
    In this paper, I argue that the notion of ‘reasonableness’ that is, for many, at the heart of the Philosophy for Children approach particularly and education for democratic citizenship more broadly, is constituted within the epistemology of ‘white ignorance’ and operates in such a way that it is unlikely to transgress the boundaries of white ignorance so as to view it from without. Drawing on scholarship in critical legal studies and social epistemology, I highlight how notions of reasonableness often include (...)
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  31. Media and Moral Education: a philosophy of critical engagement.Laura D'olimpio - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    Media and Moral Education demonstrates that the study of philosophy can be used to enhance critical thinking skills, which are sorely needed in today’s technological age. It addresses the current oversight of the educational environment not keeping pace with rapid advances in technology, despite the fact that educating students to engage critically and compassionately with others via online media is of the utmost importance. -/- D’Olimpio claims that philosophical thinking skills support the adoption of an attitude she calls critical perspectivism, (...)
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  32. Trust as a virtue in education.Laura D’Olimpio - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):193-202.
    As social and political beings, we are able to flourish only if we collaborate with others. Trust, understood as a virtue, incorporates appropriate rational emotional dispositions such as compassion as well as action that is contextual, situated in a time and place. We judge responses as appropriate and characters as trustworthy or untrustworthy based on these factors. To be considered worthy of trust, as an individual or an institution, one must do the right thing at the right time for the (...)
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  33. The Ethics of Narrative Art: philosophy in schools, compassion and learning from stories.Laura D’Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing us (...)
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  34. Ethics education and the practice of wisdom.Maughn Rollins Gregory - 2018 - In Elena K. Theodoropoulou, Didier Moreau & Christiane Gohier (eds.), Ethics in Education: Philosophical tracings and clearings. Rhodes: Laboratory of Research on Practical and Applied Philosophy, University of the Aegean. pp. 199-234.
    Ethics education in post-graduate philosophy departments and professional schools involves disciplinary knowledge and textual analysis but is mostly unconcerned with the ethical lives of students. Ethics or values education below college aims at shaping students’ ethical beliefs and conduct but lacks philosophical depth and methods of value inquiry. The «values transmission» approach to values education does not provide the opportunity for students to express doubt or criticism of the proffered values, or to practice ethical inquiry. The «inquiry» approach to values (...)
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  35. On the distinctive educational value of philosophy.Michael Hand - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):4-19.
    Should philosophy be a compulsory subject in schools? I take it as read that philosophy has general educational value: like other academic disciplines, it cultivates a range of intellectual virtues in those who study it. But that may not be a good enough reason to add it to the roster of established school subjects. The claim I defend in this article is that philosophy also has distinctive educational value: there are philosophical problems that feature prominently and pressingly in ordinary human (...)
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  36. Ethics in Education: Philosophical tracings and clearings.Elena K. Theodoropoulou, Didier Moreau & Christiane Gohier (eds.) - 2018 - Rhodes: Laboratory of Research on Practical and Applied Philosophy, University of the Aegean.
  37. Deep thinking and high ceilings: Using philosophy to challenge ‘more able’ pupils.Carrie Winstanley - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):111-133.
    At different times in their school career and across different subject areas, some pupils may require additional and/or more complex tasks from their teachers, since they find the work set to be insufficiently challenging. Recommendations for coping with these pupils’ needs are varied, but among other responses, it is common, in the field of ‘gifted and talented’ education, to advocate the use of critical thinking programmes. These can be very effective in providing the missing challenge through helping develop pupils’ facilities (...)
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  38. Melarete and peech: Preface to an international philosophy with children collaboration.Michael Burroughs & Mortari Luigina - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):69-86.
    In this paper we discuss two research programs – MELARETE and Philosophical Ethics in Early Childhood – and an emerging international research collaboration based on the benefits of practicing philosophy for meaning in early and middle childhood education. We argue for the good of philosophical thinking and its benefits to young students, with a particular focus on ethical development and meaning. We contend that through philosophical pedagogy we can make learning, meaning, vital to students. This is particularly relevant when dealing (...)
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  39. Venture in/between ethics, education and literary media: making cases for dialogic communities of ethical enquiry.Kenny Colm - 2017 - Dissertation, Dublin City University
    The thesis contends that education and literary studies can make a valuable contribution to ethics and ethical development of persons, their relations with others and with the world. It promotes an approach to ethics education through dialogic enquiry based on theories and practices associated with comparative literature and philosophical enquiry. These involve students sharing experiences and meanings as they participate in interpretive communities and communities of philosophical enquiry. There are two main components to the research: ethically focused studies of literary (...)
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  40. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  41. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children.Maughn Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world. The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy (...)
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  42. Philosophic Communities of Inquiry: The Search for and Finding of Meaning as the Basis for Developing a Sense of Responsibility.Arie Kizel - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):87 - 103.
    The attempt to define meaning arouses numerous questions, such as whether life can be meaningful without actions devoted to a central purpose or whether the latter guarantee a meaningful life. Communities of inquiry are relevant in this context because they create relationships within and between people and the environment. The more they address relations—social, cognitive, emotional, etc.—that tie-in with the children’s world even if not in a concrete fashion, the more they enable young people to search for and find meaning. (...)
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  43. How effective is Philosophy for Children in contributing to the affective engagement of pupils in the context of secondary Religious Education?Asha Lancaster-Thomas - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1):102-122.
    This paper reports the findings of a predominantly qualitative study that explored the effects of the practice of Philosophy for Children on pupils’ affective engagement.[1] From its conception, the practice of P4C has been linked to the development of caring and collaborative thinking and the study aimed to closely consider that relationship. An appropriate self-designed P4C program was implemented with 75 Year 9 pupils of Religious Education at an independent secondary school in the United Kingdom. An interpretive research approach was (...)
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  44. Justice and Children’s Rights: the Role of Moral Psychology in the Practical Philosophy Discourse.Mar Cabezas - 2016 - Las Torres de Lucca: Revista Internacional de Filosofía Política 5 (8):41-73.
    Justice for children meets specific obstacles when it comes to its realization due not only to the nature of rights and the peculiarities of children as subjects of rights. The conflict of interests between short-term and long-term aims, and the different interpretations a state can do on the question concerning how to materialize social rights policies and how to interpret its commitments on social justice play also a role. Starting by the question on why the affluent states do not seem (...)
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  45. Sentir, pensar, agir: estrutura ética do programa de Filosofia para Crianças.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2016 - In Malvina Dorneles (ed.), O Sensível e a Sensibilidade na Pesquisa em Educação. Bahia: Editora Universidade Federal do Recôncavo da Bahia. pp. 87-108.
    In the 1970s, Lipman and Sharp created the Philosophy for Children programme, which was later adopted by several countries and implemented according to specific settings and pedagogical nuances. At the same time, Philosophy for Children is nowadays an autonomous subject in Philosophy and its history has been acknowledged. Its purpose goes beyond the logical structuring of thought, and its philosophical-educational premise offers an operative complementarity between rationality and affectivity. Demanding challenges are put to the facilitators of the communities of philosophical (...)
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  46. Philosophy for children meets the art of living: a holistic approach to an education for life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical application of philosophy (...)
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  47. Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. [REVIEW]Laura D’Olimpio - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):104-106.
    Philosophy in Schools: An introduction for philosophers and teachers edited by Sara Goering, Nicholas J Shudak and Thomas E Wartenberg. Taylor & Francis, New York, NY. ISBN: 9780415640633. The edited collection Philosophy in Schools: An introduction for philosophers and teachers is exactly that; an introduction to the central ideas of the Philosophy in Schools movement, with tips and strategies as to how to implement Philosophy for Children in your classroom or educational space. With 25 chapters, this handy edition includes the (...)
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  48. To Describe, Transmit or Inquire: Ethics and technology in school.Viktor Gardelli - 2016 - Dissertation, Luleå University of Technology
    Ethics is of vital importance to the Swedish educational system, as in many other educational systems around the world.Yet, it is unclear how ethics should be dealt with in school, and prior research and evaluations have found serious problems regarding ethics in education.The field of moral education lacks clear and widely accepted definitions of key concepts, and these ambiguities negatively impact both research and educational practice. This thesis draws a distinction between three approaches to ethics in school – the descriptive (...)
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  49. From laboratory to praxis: communities of philosophical inquiry as a model of (and for) social activism.Arie Kizel - 2016 - Childhood and Philosophy 12 (25):497 – 517.
    This article discusses the conditions under which dialogical learner-researchers can move out of the philosophical laboratory of a community of philosophical inquiry into the field of social activism, engaging in a critical and creative examination of society and seeking to change it. Based on Matthew Lipman’s proposal that communities of philosophical inquiry can serve as a model of social activism in the present, it presents the community of philosophical inquiry as a model for social activism in the future. In other (...)
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  50. Enabling identity: The challenge of presenting the silenced voices of repressed groups in philosophic communities of inquiry.Arie Kizel - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):16-39.
    This article seeks to contribute to the challenge of presenting the silenced voices of excluded groups in society by means of a philosophic community of inquiry composed primarily of children and young adults. It proposes a theoretical model named ‘enabling identity’ that presents the stages whereby, under the guiding role played by the community of philosophic inquiry, the hegemonic meta-narrative of the mainstream society makes room for the identity of members of marginalised groups. The model is based on the recognition (...)
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