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  1. P4C as Microcosm of Civil Society.Senem Saner - forthcoming - Precollege Philosophy and Public Practice.
    Philosophy for Children (P4C) practice and its distinctive method of cultivating communities of philosophical inquiry model two main functions of democratic civil society. Civil society makes explicit the implicit agreement of communal membership and common belonging and mediates the diverse interests and values of community members. An essential principle of civil society that underlies these two functions is that its members possess intrinsic and political equality, fostering a unique space for civic engagement and democratic will-formation. P4C programs enact these functions (...)
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  2. The Narrow-Sense and Wide-Sense Community of Inquiry: What It Means for Teachers.Gilbert Burgh - 2021 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 41 (1):12-26.
    In this paper, I introduce the narrow-sense and wide-sense conceptions of the community of inquiry (Sprod, 2001) as a way of understanding what is meant by the phrase ‘converting the classroom into a community of inquiry.’ The wide-sense conception is the organising or regulative principle of scholarly communities of inquiry and a classroom-wide ideal for the reconstruction of education. I argue that converting the classroom into a community of inquiry requires more than following a specific procedural method, and, therefore, that (...)
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  3. Teaching Democracy in an Age of Uncertainty: Place-Responsive Learning.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2021 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    The strength of democracy lies in its ability to self-correct, to solve problems and adapt to new challenges. However, increased volatility, resulting from multiple crises on multiple fronts – humanitarian, financial, and environmental – is testing this ability. By offering a new framework for democratic education, Teaching Democracy in an Age of Uncertainty begins a dialogue with education professionals towards the reconstruction of education and by extension our social, cultural and political institutions. -/- This book is the first monograph on (...)
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  4. Is That a Philosophical Question? The Philosopher as Teacher.Karen S. Emmerman - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (2):302-320.
  5. Philosophy for Children and Children’s Philosophical Thinking.Maughn Gregory - 2021 - In Anna Pagès (ed.), A History of Western Philosophy of Education in the Contemporary Landscape. Bloomsbury. pp. 153-177.
    Since the late 1960s, philosophy for children has become a global, multi-disciplinary movement involving innovations in curriculum, pedagogy, educational theory, and teacher education; in moral, social and political philosophy; and in discourse and literary theory. And it has generated the new academic field of philosophy of childhood. Gareth B. Matthews (1929-2011) traced contemporary disrespect for children to Aristotle, for whom the child is essentially a pre-intellectual and pre-moral precursor to the fully realized human adult. Matthews Matthews dubbed this the “deficit (...)
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  6. P4C & Community-Engaged Pedagogy.Erik Kenyon - 2021 - In Stephen Miller (ed.), Intentional Disruptions: Expanding Access to Philosophy. pp. 35-48.
  7. A Seminar on Philosophy for/with Children as a Dialogical Space Between Jews and Arabs at the University of Haifa.Arie Kizel - 2021 - In International Association for Teachers of Philosophy at Schools and Universities Yearbook. Zürich: pp. 176-184.
    In recent years, the educational-system development specialization of the MA program in the University of Haifa’s Faculty of Education has held an annual seminar on Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC). Under my guidance, Jewish, Muslim, Christian, Druze, and Circassian students have formed a group embodying a living and breathing dialogical space. Despite the global spread of P4wC principles following the emergence of the P4C movement promoted by the International Council of Philosophical Inquiry and its practice in dozens of national and regional (...)
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  8. The Facilitator as Self-Liberator and Enabler: Ethical Responsibility in Communities of Philosophical Inquiry.Arie Kizel - 2021 - Childhood and Philosophy 17:1-20.
    From its inception, philosophy for/with children (P4wC) has sought to promote philosophical discussion with children based on the latter’s own questions and a pedagogic method designed to encourage critical, creative, and caring thinking. Communities of inquiry can be plagued by power struggles prompted by diverse identities, however. These not always being highlighted in the literature or P4wC discourse, this article proposes a two-stage model for facilitators as part of their ethical responsibility. In the first phase, they should free themselves from (...)
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  9. Practising Philosophy of Mathematics with Children.Elisa Bezençon - 2020 - Philosophy of Mathematics Education Journal 36.
    This article examines the possibility of philosophizing about mathematics with children. It aims at outlining the nature of the practice of philosophy of mathematics with children in a mainly theoretical and exploratory way. First, an attempt at a definition is proposed. Second, I suggest some reasons that might motivate such a practice. My thesis is that one can identify an intrinsic as well as two extrinsic goals of philosophizing about mathematics with children. The intrinsic goal is related to a presumed (...)
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  10. Book Review: In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education, by Maughn Rollins Gregory and Megan Jane Laverty (Eds). [REVIEW]Gilbert Burgh - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 7 (1):132-138.
    In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education is the first in a series edited by Maughn Gregory and Megan Laverty, Philosophy for Children Founders, and is a major contribution to the literature on philosophy in schools. It draws attention to an author and practitioner who was largely responsible for the development of scholarship on the community of inquiry, who co-founded the Institute for the Advancement of Philosophy for Children (IAPC), and who undeniably made a significant (...)
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  11. filosofia para crianças: a (im)possibilidade de lhe chamar outras coisas.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2020 - Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brasil: NEFI Edições.
    Apresentamos um trabalho composto por um conjunto de reflexões nascidas em tempos e espaços distintos. A maior parte dos capítulos retoma textos já publicados, mas que foram repensados e reescritos a partir do que hoje vemos. Outros só agora se tornam dia. Paralelamente à escolha dos textos, à depuração da escrita e ao afinamento da redação, um outro exercício emergiu: pensar cada capítulo como evento de um processo cujo dinamismo próprio não se deixa fixar. Os textos mostraram-se, então, como inscrições (...)
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  12. Resisting the 'View From Nowhere': Positionality in Philosophy for/with Children Research.Peter Paul Elicor - 2020 - Philosophia International Journal of Philosophy (Philippines) 1 (21):10-33.
    While Philosophy for/with Children (P4wC) provides a better alternative to the usual ‘banking’ model of education, questions have been raised regarding its applicability in non-western contexts. Despite its adherence to the ideals of democratic dialogue, not all members of a Community of Inquiry (COI) will be disposed to participate in the inquiry, not because they are incapable of doing so, but because they are positioned inferiorly within the group thereby affecting their efforts to speak out on topics that are meaningful (...)
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  13. 子どもの哲学と民主主義 選好の変化とコンセンサス形成を 可視化するワークの開発と実践̶.Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - 思考と対話 1 (2):26-37.
    This article examines the relationship between Philosophy for/with Children and democracy from both theoretical and empirical perspectives. The first half of the article draws on the theory of deliberative democracy to identify some democratic aspects of Philosophy for/with Children. The second half of the article empirically investigates the way in which we can practice Philosophy for/with Children as a practice of deliberative democracy. To this end, the article illustrates the classroom activity designed by the authors, the aim of which is (...)
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  14. The Utah Lyceum: Cultivating "Reasonableness" in Southwest Utah.Kristopher G. Phillips & Gracia Allen - 2020 - In Claire Katz (ed.), Growing Up with Philosophy Camp. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 111-120.
    In this chapter we discuss the role of what we call "reasonableness" in a philosophy summer camp held at Southern Utah University. "Reasonableness," as we call it, is a more narrowly prescribed form of rationality - indeed one can be rational but unreasonable, but not the other way around. We discuss the importance and value of introducing philosophy to students before they get to college, and describe some of the challenges we face in introducing students in SW Utah to philosophy.
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  15. Engineer Education as Citizenship Education.Ogawa Taiji, Murase Tomoyuki & Kei Nishiyama - 2020 - In Proceedings of InInternational Symposium on Advances in Technology Education Conference. International Symposium on Advances in Technology Education. pp. 326-331.
    Engineering and technology aim to lead a better life for people. But the meaning of “better” is highly contested in modern democratic societies where different citizens have different cultures and values. Engineers, as one of the citizens in such societies, are also living in multicultural and multi-value settings, and therefore they need to be responsible for such diversity when they engage in technological developments. Therefore, in engineering education, it is necessary to aim at not only acquiring the specialized technological knowledge (...)
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  16. Philosophy and the Curriculum.Monica Bini, Alan Tapper, Peter Ellerton, Stephan John Millett & Sue Knight - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 156-171.
    Philosophy in schools in Australia dates back to the 1980s and is rooted in the Philosophy for Children curriculum and pedagogy. Seeing potential for educational change, Australian advocates were quick to develop new classroom resources and innovative programs that have proved influential in educational practice throughout Australia and internationally. Behind their contributions lie key philosophical and educational discussions and controversies which have shaped attempts to introduce philosophy in schools and embed it in state and national curricula. Drawing together a wide (...)
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  17. The Philosophical Classroom: An Australian Story.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 1-5.
  18. Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The Development of an Inquiring Society in Australia.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.) - 2019 - Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
    Philosophy in schools in Australia dates back to the 1980s and is rooted in the Philosophy for Children curriculum and pedagogy. Seeing potential for educational change, Australian advocates were quick to develop new classroom resources and innovative programs that have proved influential in educational practice throughout Australia and internationally. Behind their contributions lie key philosophical and educational discussions and controversies which have shaped attempts to introduce philosophy in schools and embed it in state and national curricula. -/- Drawing together a (...)
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  19. A possibilidade do tempo e a temporalidade dos possíveis na comunidade de investigação filosófica.Magda Costa Carvalho - 2019 - Revista Do NESEF 2 (8):62-76.
    Following Lévinas, for whom the Bergsonian defense of duration beyond time that is merely chronological corresponds to the release of terror of a world where novelty is impossible, this article proposes, in the field of philosophy for children, a thought exercise beyond what is known and mastered, that upsets the comfortable and habitual rhythms of the predictable and dislodges itself from naturally accepted ideas. Starting from the intersection of the Bergsonian concepts of possibility and temporality, we propose promoting collaborative, problematizing (...)
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  20. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Magda Costa Carvalho & Walter Kohan - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a problem with (...)
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  21. Philosophical Inquiry with Indigenous Children: An Attempt to Integrate Indigenous Knowledge in Philosophy for/with Children.Peter Paul Elicor - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:1-22.
    In this article, I propose to integrate indigenous knowledges in the Philosophy for/with Children theory and practice. I make the claim that it is possible to treat indigenous knowledges, not only as topics for philosophical dialogues with children but as presuppositions of the philosophical activity itself within the Community of Inquiry. Such integration is important for at least three (3) reasons: First, recognizing indigenous ways of thinking and seeing the world informs us of other non-dominant forms of knowledges, methods to (...)
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  22. Bringing Undergraduates to Preschool: An Ethics Course for the Very Young.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - In Thomas E. Wartenberg (ed.), Philosophy in Classrooms and Beyond: New Approaches to Picture-Book Philosophy. pp. 1-16.
  23. Ethics for the Very Young.Erik Kenyon - 2019 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    Can you be brave if you’re afraid? Why do we “know better” and do things anyway? What makes a family? Philosophers have wrestled with such questions for centuries. They are also the stuff of playground debates. Ethics for the Very Young uses the perplexities of young children’s lives to spark philosophical dialogue. Its lessons scaffold discussion through executive function games (Telephone, Red Light Green Light), dialogic reading of picture books and Reggio Emilia’s art-based inquiry. In the process, children develop skills (...)
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  24. I–Thou Dialogical Encounters in Adolescents’ WhatsApp Virtual Communities.Arie Kizel - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (1):19-27.
    The use of WhatsApp as a means of communication is widespread amongst today‘s youth, many of whom spend hours in virtual space, in particular during the evenings and nighttime in the privacy of their own homes. This article seeks to contribute to the discussion of the dialogical language and ―conversations‖ conducted in virtual-space encounters and the way in which young people perceive this space, its affect on them, and their interrelations within it. It presents the findings of a study based (...)
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  25. Finding Treasures: Is the Community of Philosophical Inquiry a Methodology?Walter Omar Kohan & Magda Costa Carvalho - 2019 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 38 (3):275-289.
    In the world of Philosophy for Children, the word “method” is found frequently in its literature and in its practitioner’s handbooks. This paper focuses on the idea of community of philosophical inquiry as P4C’s methodological framework for educational purposes, and evaluates that framework and those purposes in light of the question, what does it mean to bring children and philosophy together, and what methodological framework, if any, is appropriate to that project? Our broader aim is to highlight a problem with (...)
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  26. Rethinking Consensus in the Community of Philosophical Inquiry: A Research Agenda.Kei Nishiyama - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15:83-97.
    In Philosophy for Children (P4C), consensus-making is often regarded as something that needs to be avoided. P4C scholars believe that consensus-making would dismiss P4C’s ideals, such as freedom, inclusiveness, and diversity. This paper aims to counteract such assumptions, arguing that P4C scholars tend to focus on a narrow, or universal, concept of “consensus” and dismiss various forms of consensus, especially what Niemeyer and Dryzek (2007) call meta-consensus. Meta-consensus does not search for universal consensus, but focuses on the process by which (...)
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  27. Growing Up with Philosophy in Australia: Philosophy as Cultural Discourse.Simone Thornton & Gilbert Burgh - 2019 - In Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton (eds.), Philosophical Inquiry with Children: The development of an inquiring society in Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge. pp. 236‒249.
    As the purpose of this book is to open dialogue, we draw no conclusions. Instead, reflecting on the theoretical and practical implications that arise from each chapter, we offer some reflection through an exploration of the ways in which Australia has broadened discussions on P4C. In addition, we situate our discussion in contemporary global issues relevant to education and schooling: gender stereotyping, bias and language; Aboriginal philosophy; environmental education; and sexuality, adolescence and discrimination. As a community of children, adolescents and (...)
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  28. Aporia and Picture Books.Maria daVenza Tillmanns - 2019 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 39 (2):11-22.
    Here is an example using a picture book story: A New House, in Grasshopper on the Road: by Arnold Lobel Grasshopper sees an apple on top of a hill and decides, yum! lunch, as he takes a big bite out of the apple. This, however, causes the apple to start rolling down the hill. Grasshopper hears a voice inside the apple, telling him to keep his house from being destroyed as it is rolling down the hill. My bathtub is in (...)
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  29. Teaching Critical Thinking and Metacognitive Skills Through Philosophical Enquiry. A Practitioner's Report on Experiments in the Classroom.Emma Worley & Peter Worley - 2019 - Childhood and Philosophy 15.
    Although expert consensus states that critical thinking (CT) is essential to enquiry, it doesn’t necessarily follow that by practicing enquiry children are developing CT skills. Philosophy with children programmes around the world aim to develop CT dispositions and skills through a community of enquiry, and this study compared the impact of the explicit teaching of CT skills during an enquiry, to The Philosophy Foundation's philosophical enquiry (PhiE) method alone (which had no explicit teaching of CT skills). Philosophy with children is (...)
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  30. The Need for Philosophy in Promoting Democracy: A Case for Philosophy in the Curriculum.Gilbert Burgh - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):38-58.
    The studies by Trickey and Topping, which provide empirical support that philosophy produces cognitive gains and social benefits, have been used to advocate the view that philosophy deserves a place in the curriculum. Arguably, the existing curriculum, built around well-established core subjects, already provides what philosophy is said to do, and, therefore, there is no case to be made for expanding it to include philosophy. However, if we take citizenship education seriously, then the development of active and informed citizens requires (...)
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  31. Da Árvore E Do Rizoma: Pensar Para Além Do Método o Encontro da Filosofia Com a Inf'ncia.Magda Costa Carvalho & Walter Omar Kohan - 2018 - Educação E Filosofia 32 (65).
    This work aims to consider philosophically the issue of the method in philosophical practices with children. It analyzes some influences received by the creators of Philosophy for Children, Matthew Lipman and Ann Margaret Sharp, like the pragmatism of J. Dewey. It describes the meanings of three similar expressions in Lipman's work: methodical, methodological and method. It offers some criticisms of method: Hans-Georg Gadamer, but especially Henri Bergson and Gilles Deleuze. Finally, he questions the need of a method for doing philosophy (...)
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  32. Media and Moral Education: A Philosophy of Critical Engagement.Laura D'olimpio - 2018 - London, UK: Routledge.
    Media and Moral Education demonstrates that the study of philosophy can be used to enhance critical thinking skills, which are sorely needed in today’s technological age. It addresses the current oversight of the educational environment not keeping pace with rapid advances in technology, despite the fact that educating students to engage critically and compassionately with others via online media is of the utmost importance. -/- D’Olimpio claims that philosophical thinking skills support the adoption of an attitude she calls critical perspectivism, (...)
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  33. The Ethics of Narrative Art: Philosophy in Schools, Compassion and Learning From Stories.Laura D’Olimpio & Andrew Peterson - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (1):92-110.
    Following neo-Aristotelians Alasdair MacIntyre and Martha Nussbaum, we claim that humans are story-telling animals who learn from the stories of diverse others. Moral agents use rational emotions, such as compassion which is our focus here, to imaginatively reconstruct others’ thoughts, feelings and goals. In turn, this imaginative reconstruction plays a crucial role in deliberating and discerning how to act. A body of literature has developed in support of the role narrative artworks (i.e. novels and films) can play in allowing us (...)
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  34. Promoting Human Development by Doing Philosophy at the Heart of the Family.Helena Modzelewski - 2018 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 5 (2):127-149.
    Human development requires the education of autonomous citizens, capable of critically approaching their opportunities. However, if this is left to the school alone, the children’s most important educational environment—the family—is neglected. The Community of Inquiry, developed by Matthew Lipman into an educational methodology, aims at educating students to be critical citizens by developing habits of mind through collaborative philosophical inquiry. The research reported here was targeted at introducing the COI into the family, particularly addressing the intersubjective relationships among participants. In (...)
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  35. Between Crisis-Philia and Crisis-Phobia: Reflections on the Community of Inquiry.Aaron Yarmel - 2018 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 39 (1):46-64.
    Conflict is a ubiquitous feature of community life, and communities based on inquiry are no exception. Sometimes, conflict escalates into crisis. A crisis may help a community by providing opportunities for its members to recognize and ameliorate their shortcomings, but it may also destroy a community or limit its ability to sustain productive projects. In this discussion, I articulate two orientations towards crisis: crisis-philia (loving crises and seeking them out) and crisis-phobia (fearing crises and seeking to avoid them). I argue, (...)
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  36. Os diagramas de Venn como recurso filosófico no jardim de infancia.Magda Costa Carvalho, Ana Isabel Santos & Renata Sequeira - 2017 - Educação E Filosofia 31 (62):727-750.
    This research lies within the scientific and pedagogic scope of Philosophy for Children, more specifically its implementation in a community of philosophical inquiry, the pedagogic and epistemological model of the Philosophy for Children, with pre-school children. The purpose was to research the type of answer this community of inquiry would give to some logic problems by resorting to Venn Diagrams. Specifically, the observation of problem-solving through the intersection of sets was under scrutiny, and the conclusion was that this logic resource (...)
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  37. The Community of Philosophical Inquiry as a Regulative Ideal.Magda Costa Carvalho & Dina Mendonça - 2017 - In Felix Moryion, Elen Duthie & R. Robles (eds.), Parecidos de familia. Propuestas actuales en Filosofía para Niños / Family ressemblances. Current proposals in Philosophy for Children. Madrid: Anaya. pp. 36-46.
    The paper proposes that taking the notion of “community of inquiry” as a regulative ideal is a valuable working tool for the refinement and improvement of the practice of Philosophy for Children (P4C). Reed (1996) and Sprod (1997) have already drawn attention to this, stating that the community of inquiry is more a regulative idea than a typical occurrence. Building on these claims, we will show that taking the notion of community of inquiry as such gives new light to many (...)
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  38. Não deve dar a palavra aos amigos... assim não é justo! Representações das crianças sobre o Gestor da Palavra na Comunidade de Investigação Filosófica.Magda Costa Carvalho & Ana Isabel Santos - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (27):369-391.
    El presente artículo tiene como objetivo la presentación y discusión de las representaciones de los niños sobre el papel del Gestor de la Palabra (GP). Se trata de un recurso concebido y desarrollado en el ámbito de las sesiones de Filosofía para Niños, de acuerdo con la metodología de la comunidad de investigación filosófica (community of philosophical inquiry) de Matthew Lipman (2003) y de Ann Margaret Sharp (1987). Designamos como “Gestor de la Palabra” al miembro de la comunidad de investigación (...)
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  39. Philosophy in the (Gender and the Law) Classroom.Laura D'Olimpio - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):1-16.
    This article reflects on the ‘Philosophy and Gender’ project, which introduced the pedagogical technique known as the ‘Community of Inquiry’ into an undergraduate Gender and the Law course at the University of Western Australia. The Community of Inquiry is a pedagogy developed by Matthew Lipman in the discipline of Philosophy that facilitates collaborative and democratic philosophical thinking in the context of teaching philosophy in schools. Our project was to see if this pedagogy could advance two objectives in Gender and the (...)
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  40. Playing with Philosophy: Gestures, Performance, P4C and an Art of Living.Laura D’Olimpio & Christoph Teschers - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    It can hardly be denied that play is an important tool for the development and socialisation of children. In this article we argue that, through dramaturgical play in combination with pedagogical tools such as the Community of Inquiry (CoI), in the tradition of Philosophy for Children (P4C), students can creatively think, reflect and be more aware of the impact their gestures (Schmid 2000b) have on others. One of the most fundamental aspects of the embodied human life is human interaction that (...)
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  41. The Routledge International Handbook of Philosophy for Children.Maughn Rollins Gregory, Joanna Haynes & Karin Murris (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This rich and diverse collection offers a range of perspectives and practices of Philosophy for Children (P4C). P4C has become a significant educational and philosophical movement with growing impact on schools and educational policy. Its community of inquiry pedagogy has been taken up in community, adult, higher, further and informal educational settings around the world. The internationally sourced chapters offer research findings as well as insights into debates provoked by bringing children’s voices into moral and political arenas and to philosophy (...)
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  42. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp: Childhood, Philosophy and Education.Maughn Rollins Gregory & Megan Laverty (eds.) - 2017 - London, UK: Routledge.
    In close collaboration with the late Matthew Lipman, Ann Margaret Sharp pioneered the theory and practice of ‘the community of philosophical inquiry’ (CPI) as a way of practicing ‘Philosophy for Children’ and prepared thousands of philosophers and teachers throughout the world in this practice. In Community of Inquiry with Ann Margaret Sharp represents a long-awaited and much-needed anthology of Sharp’s insightful and influential scholarship, bringing her enduring legacy to new generations of academics, postgraduate students and researchers in the fields of (...)
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  43. Teaching Philosophy Through Paintings: A Museum Workshop.Savvas Ioannou, Kypros Georgiou & Ourania Maria Ventista - 2017 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 38 (1):62-83.
    There is wide research about the Philosophy for/with Children program. However, there is not any known attempt to investigate how a philosophical discussion can be implemented through a museum workshop. The present research aims to discuss aesthetic and epistemological issues with primary school children through a temporary art exhibition in a museum in Cyprus. Certainly, paintings have been used successfully to connect philosophical topics with the experiences of the children. We suggest, though, that this is not as innovative as the (...)
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  44. Philosophic Communities of Inquiry: The Search for and Finding of Meaning as the Basis for Developing a Sense of Responsibility.Arie Kizel - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (26):87 - 103.
    The attempt to define meaning arouses numerous questions, such as whether life can be meaningful without actions devoted to a central purpose or whether the latter guarantee a meaningful life. Communities of inquiry are relevant in this context because they create relationships within and between people and the environment. The more they address relations—social, cognitive, emotional, etc.—that tie-in with the children’s world even if not in a concrete fashion, the more they enable young people to search for and find meaning. (...)
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  45. Kizel, A. (2017). “Existing in the World: But Whose World—and Why Not Change It?” Childhood and Philosophy 13 (28), 567–577.Arie Kizel - 2017 - Childhood and Philosophy 13 (28):567-577.
    This article takes issue with Gert Biesta’s lecture and the interpretation that one of his main arguments leads to the conclusion that the world is essentialist in nature. Thus, for any specific kind of entity, there is a set of characteristics, all of which any entity of that kind must have. In this text I will argue that existence “in the world” necessarily demands the belief that many other worlds consisting of diverse identities and communities have long been present and (...)
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  46. On the Seam: Philosophy with Palestinian Girls in an East Jerusalem Village as a Pedagogy of Searching.Arie Kizel & Marlene Abdallah - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 4 (1):27 - 49.
    The ‘Marwa’ elementary school (pseudonym) – an Israeli public school on the border between Israel and the Palestinian Authority – is a unique educational institution in that, despite being not religious, it only accepts from Grade 1 through to Grade 6 girls. Several years ago, the principal decided to implement a Philosophy with Children (PwC) programme as an alternative pedagogy. This paper surveys how the educational faculty regarded the introduction of this curriculum and how it contributed towards the development of (...)
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  47. Comparing Two Inquiry Professional Development Interventions in Science on Primary Students’ Questioning and Other Inquiry Behaviours.Kim Nichols, Gilbert Burgh & Callie Kennedy - 2017 - Research in Science Education 47 (1):1–24.
    Developing students’ skills to pose and respond to questions and actively engage in inquiry behaviours enables students to problem solve and critically engage with learning and society. The aim of this study was to analyse the impact of providing teachers with an intervention in inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum in comparison to an intervention in non-inquiry pedagogy alongside inquiry science curriculum on student questioning and other inquiry behaviours. Teacher participants in the comparison condition received training in four inquiry-based science (...)
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  48. Kizel, A. (2016). “Pedagogy Out of Fear of Philosophy as a Way of Pathologizing Children”. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning, Vol. 10, No. 20, Pp. 28 – 47.Kizel Arie - 2016 - Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning 10 (20):28 – 47.
    The article conceptualizes the term Pedagogy of Fear as the master narrative of educational systems around the world. Pedagogy of Fear stunts the active and vital educational growth of the young person, making him/her passive and dependent upon external disciplinary sources. It is motivated by fear that prevents young students—as well as teachers—from dealing with the great existential questions that relate to the essence of human beings. One of the techniques of the Pedagogy of Fear is the internalization of the (...)
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  49. Philosophy in Schools: An Introduction for Philosophers and Teachers. [REVIEW]Laura D’Olimpio - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 3 (1):104-106.
    Philosophy in Schools: An introduction for philosophers and teachers edited by Sara Goering, Nicholas J Shudak and Thomas E Wartenberg. Taylor & Francis, New York, NY. ISBN: 9780415640633. The edited collection Philosophy in Schools: An introduction for philosophers and teachers is exactly that; an introduction to the central ideas of the Philosophy in Schools movement, with tips and strategies as to how to implement Philosophy for Children in your classroom or educational space. With 25 chapters, this handy edition includes the (...)
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  50. Kizel, A. (2016). “Philosophy with Children as an Educational Platform for Self-Determined Learning”. Cogent Education, Vol. 3, Number 1: 1244026.Arie Kizel - 2016 - Cogent Education 3 (1):1244026.
    This article develops a theoretical framework for understanding the applicability and relevance of Philosophy with Children in and out of schools as a platform for self-determined learning in light of the developments of the past 40 years. Based on the philosophical writings of Matthew Lipman, the father of Philosophy for Children, and in particular his ideas regarding the search for meaning, it frames Philosophy with Children in six dimensions that contrast with classic classroom disciplinary learning, advocating a “pedagogy of searching” (...)
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