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Subcategories:History/traditions: Non-Human Animals

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  1. How to Tell If Animals Can Understand Death.Susana Monsó - 2022 - Erkenntnis 87 (1):117-136.
    It is generally assumed that humans are the only animals who can possess a concept of death. However, the ubiquity of death in nature and the evolutionary advantages that would come with an understanding of death provide two prima facie reasons for doubting this assumption. In this paper, my intention is not to defend that animals of this or that nonhuman species possess a concept of death, but rather to examine how we could go about empirically determining whether animals can (...)
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  2. The Problem of Interspecies Welfare Comparisons (Preprint).Heather Browning - manuscript
    One of the biggest problems in applications of animal welfare science is our ability to make comparisons between different individuals, particularly different species. Although welfare science provides methods for measuring the welfare of individual animals, there’s no established method for comparing measures between individuals. This problem occurs because of the underdetermination of the conclusions given the data, arising from two sources of variation that we cannot distinguish – variation in the underlying target variable (welfare experience) and in the relationship of (...)
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  3. La zarigüeya de Schrödinger: Cómo viven y entienden la muerte los animales.Susana Monsó - 2021 - Madrid, Spain: Plaza y Valdés.
    Cuando la zarigüeya se siente amenazada, se paraliza, con los ojos y la boca abiertos en una mueca petrificada, la temperatura corporal y respiración reducidas al mínimo, la lengua desplegando un tono azulado y sus glándulas anales oliendo a podrido. Pese a este disfraz de cadáver putrefacto, sigue pendiente de su entorno, lista para volver a la acción. Como el gato en la famosa paradoja de Schrödinger, la zarigüeya está viva y muerta al mismo tiempo. -/- En este libro exploraremos (...)
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  4. Curiosidad clasificatoria y cultura nacional en el Reino Unido entre los siglos XVIII y XIX. Reseña de Harriet Ritvo, The Platypus and the Mermaid and Other Figments of the Classifying Imagination, Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 1997. [REVIEW]Biani Paola Sánchez López -
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  5. Noble Animals, Brutish Animals.Marcus Hunt - 2021 - Between the Species 24 (1):70-92.
    The paper begins with a description of a grey seal performing conspecific infanticide. The paper then gives an account of “nobleness” and “brutishness.” Roughly, a behavioural-disposition is noble/brutish if it is one that would be a moral virtue/vice if the possessor of the behavioural-disposition were a moral agent. The paper then advances two pairs of axiological claims. The first pair of claims is that nobleness is good and that brutishness is bad. The second pair of claims is about an axiological (...)
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  6. Margery Fee. Polar Bear. (Animal.) 224 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. London: Reaktion Books, 2019. £12.95 (Paper); ISBN 9781789141467. [REVIEW]Ann Norton Greene - 2021 - Isis 112 (1):168-169.
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  7. Human Beings Among the Beasts.Andrew M. Bailey & Alexander R. Pruss - 2021 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 102 (3):455-467.
    In this article, we develop and defend a new argument for animalism -- the thesis that we human persons are human animals. The argument takes this rough form: since our pets are animals, we are too. We’ll begin with remarks on animalism and its rivals, develop our main argument, and then defend it against a few replies.
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  8. Issues and Themes in Comparative Studies: Language, Cognition and Culture .Louise Röska-Hardy - 2008 - In Louise Röska-Hardy & Eva Neumann-Held (eds.), In: Learning from animals? Examining the nature of human uniqueness. Hove, UK: pp. 1-12.
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  9. Angelica Groom. Exotic Animals in the Art and Culture of the Medici Court in Florence. (Rulers and Elites, 16.) Xix + 340 Pp., Figs., Bibl., Index. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2018. €127 (Cloth). E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Adriana Turpin - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):665-666.
  10. Michel Anctil. Luminous Creatures: The History and Science of Light Production in Living Organisms. Xvii + 467 Pp., Bibl., Index. Montreal/Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2018. $49.95 (Cloth). E-Book Available. [REVIEW]Rachel A. Ankeny - 2020 - Isis 111 (3):654-655.
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  11. Michael Worboys; Julie-Marie Strange; Neil Pemberton. The Invention of the Modern Dog: Breed and Blood in Victorian Britain. (Animals, History, Culture.) Viii + 282 Pp., Notes, Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2018. [REVIEW]Peter Hobbins - 2020 - Isis 111 (2):407-409.
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  12. Posthumanism: A Guide for the Perplexed. By Peter Mahon. Pp. Vi, 346, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, £21.99.Peter Admirand - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):587-588.
    In Posthumanism: A Guide for the Perplexed, Peter Mahon gives his readers an overview of posthumanism, examining the intoxicating-and often troubling-entanglements of humans, animals and technology in science, society and culture that constitute its field. Mahon not only explores the key scientific advances in information technology and genetics have made us and society posthuman, but also how certain strands in art (such as science fiction and video games) and philosophy (for example, in the work of Andy Clarke and Jacques Derrida) (...)
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  13. Learning From Animals? Examining the Nature of Human Uniqueness.Louise Röska-Hardy & Eva M. Neumann-Held (eds.) - 2008 - London: Psychology Press.
    Human language, cognition, and culture are unique; they are unparalleled in the animal kingdom. The claim that we can learn what makes us human by studying other animal species provokes vigorous reactions and many deny that comparative research can shed any light on the origins and character of human distinctive capacities. However, Learning from Animals? presents empirical research and an analysis of comparative approaches for an understanding of human uniqueness, arguing that we cannot know what capacities are uniquely human until (...)
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  14. A ‘Monster with Human Visage’: The Orangutan, Savagery, and the Borders of Humanity in the Global Enlightenment.Silvia Sebastiani - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (4):80-99.
    To what extent did the debate on the orangutan contribute to the global Enlightenment? This article focuses on the first 150 years of the introduction, dissection, and public exposition of the so-called ‘orangutan’ in Europe, between the 1630s, when the first specimens arrived in the Netherlands, and the 1770s, when the British debate about slavery and abolitionism reframed the boundaries between the human and animal kingdoms. Physicians, natural historians, antiquarians, philosophers, geographers, lawyers, and merchants all contributed to the knowledge of (...)
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  15. Animal Moral Psychologies.Susana Monsó & Kristin Andrews - forthcoming - In John M. Doris & Manuel Vargas (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.
    Observations of animals engaging in apparently moral behavior have led academics and the public alike to ask whether morality is shared between humans and other animals. Some philosophers explicitly argue that morality is unique to humans, because moral agency requires capacities that are only demonstrated in our species. Other philosophers argue that some animals can participate in morality because they possess these capacities in a rudimentary form. Scientists have also joined the discussion, and their views are just as varied as (...)
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  16. The Problem of Evil: Unseen Animal Suffering.Daniel Molto - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    On my view, every bone, every fossil, and every putrid whiff of carrion that one smells on a hike in the country is just as good evidence for a divine intervention as it is for the suffering of an animal.
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  17. Deconstructing Anthropocentric Privilege: Imago Dei and Nonhuman Agency.Daniel P. Horan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):560-570.
  18. Book Review: When Species Meet: Donna Haraway, When Species Meet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-8166-5046-0. X + 420 Pp. $24.95. [REVIEW]Duncan Wilson - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (1):149-155.
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  19. Animal Lessons. [REVIEW]Bronwyn Singleton - 2011 - Symposium 15 (1):241-245.
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  20. Reckoning with the Beast: Animals, Pain, and Humanity in the Victorian Mind. James Turner.Lindsay Granshaw - 1982 - Isis 73 (2):321-322.
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  21. Animal Lifestyles and Anatomies: The Case of the Prosimian Primates.Russell H. Tuttle - 1991 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 34 (4):617-618.
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  22. Thinking with Crocodiles: An Iconic Animal at the Intersection of Early-Modern Religion and Natural Philosophy.Spencer J. Weinreich - 2015 - Early Science and Medicine 20 (3):209-240.
    This paper seeks to explore how culturally and religiously significant animals could shape discourses in which they were deployed, taking the crocodile as its case study. Beginning with the textual and visual traditions linking the crocodile with Africa and the Middle East, I read sixteenth- and seventeenth-century travel narratives categorizing American reptiles as “crocodiles” rather than “alligators,” as attempts to mitigate the disruptive strangeness of the Americas. The second section draws on Ann Blair’s study of “Mosaic Philosophy” to examine scholarly (...)
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  23. Animal Affects: Spinoza and the Frontiers of the Human.Hasana Sharp - 2011 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 9 (1-2):48-68.
    Like any broad narrative about the history of ideas, this one involves a number of simplifications. My hope is that by taking a closer look Spinoza's notorious remarks on animals, we can understand better why it becomes especially urgent in this period as well as our own for philosophers to emphasize a distinction between human and nonhuman animals. In diagnosing the concerns that give rise to the desire to dismiss the independent purposes of animals, we may come to focus on (...)
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  24. Man, The Believing Animal.F. H. Heinemann - 1954 - Hibbert Journal 53:51.
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  25. Primate Encounters: Models of Science, Gender, and Society. [REVIEW]Nina Jablonksi - 2002 - Isis 93:168-169.
    Primates have been studied by more people, from more angles, for longer periods of time than any other vertebrates. Primate studies have existed for over fifty years and have attracted leagues of students from diverse backgrounds to studies of primate behavior, ecology, and evolution. The nature of the primates and their students has insured that the field has enjoyed considerable public exposure. Most people with access to a television have watched programs in which the lives of baboons, chimps, or gorillas (...)
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  26. Descartes' Bête Machine, the Leibnizian Correction and Religious Influence.John Voelpel - unknown
    René Descartes’ 1637 “bête machine” characterization of nonhuman animals has assisted in the strengthening of the Genesis 1:26 and 1: 28 disparate categorization of nonhuman animals and human animals. That characterization appeared in Descartes’ first important published writing, the Discourse on the Method, and can be summarized as including the ideas that nonhuman animals are like machines; do not have thoughts, reason or souls like human animals; and thus, cannot be categorized with humans; and, as a result, do not experience (...)
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  27. Reply to Dale Jamieson and Marc Bekoff.Kenneth Joel Shapiro - unknown
  28. A Strong Distinction Between Humans and Non-Humans is No Longer Required for Research Purposes: A Debate Between Bruno Latour and Steve Fuller.Colin Barron - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (2):77-99.
    The second International Knowledge and Discourse Conference, held at the University of Hong Kong in June 2002, was the forum for the long-awaited debate between Bruno Latour and Steve Fuller. Bruno Latour counts beyond two. He places the blame for the emphasis in academia on the subject-object distinction on Kant. Latour wants academics to acknowledge that things act, and suggests we look at other traditions, e.g. the Chinese, for alternatives to the subject-object dichotomy. Steve Fuller concentrated on the moral project (...)
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  29. The Lion's Share.Ian Ground & Michael Bavidge - forthcoming - The Philosopher.
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  30. Managing Cows: An Ethnography of Breeding Practices and Uses of Reproductive Technology in Contemporary Dairy Farming in Lombardy (Italy).Cristina Grasseni - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (2):488-510.
    The aim of this article is to contribute detailed ethnographic material to broaden the scope of what we mean by reproductive technology. Technology can be defined not only by a series of laboratory techniques that are drafted into the daily management of the animal body, but also by a range of on-farm management strategies and working routines, as well as the cultural dispositions, social networks and tacit knowledge of the actors involved. RT is communicated to lay operators and disseminated amongst (...)
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Critical Animal Studies
  1. Being Consistently Biocentric: On the (Im)Possibility of Spinozist Animal Ethics.Chandler D. Rogers - 2021 - Journal for Critical Animal Studies 18 (1):52-72.
    Spinoza’s attitude toward nonhuman animals is uncharacteristically cruel. This essay elaborates upon this ostensible idiosyncrasy in reference to Hasana Sharp’s commendable desire to revitalize a basis for animal ethics from within the bounds of his system. Despite our favoring an ethics beginning from animal affect, this essay argues that an animal ethic adequate to the demands of our historical moment cannot be developed from within the confines of strict adherence to Spinoza’s system—and this is not yet to speak of a (...)
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  2. Capitalism’s Holocaust of Animals.Katerina Kolozova - 2019 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    Laruelle's version of Marxism is termed "non-Marxism" whereby the "non-" is stated to stand for bracketing out Marxism's "philosophical sufficiency" and seeking to radicalise Marxism. It stands for the Laruellian non-philosophical variant of Marxism. It is precisely the non-philosophical use of Marx that has enabled the analysis at hand, demonstrating that at the heart of patriarchy and capitalism stands philosophical reason and its treatment of the Animal (both human and non-human). Women are de-realised even as use value and what is (...)
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  3. From the Hiatus Model to the Diffuse Discontinuities: A Turning Point in Human-Animal Studies.Carlo Brentari - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):331-345.
    In twentieth-century continental philosophy, German philosophical anthropology can be seen as a sort of conceptual laboratory devoted to human/animal research, and, in particular, to the discontinuity between human and non-human animals. Its main notion—the idea of the special position of humans in nature—is one of the first philosophical attempts to think of the specificity of humans as a natural and qualitative difference from non-human animals. This school of thought correctly rejects both the metaphysical and/or religious characterisations of humans, and the (...)
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  4. Beyond Biosecurity.Chandler D. Rogers - 2018 - Environmental Philosophy 15 (1):7-19.
    As boundaries between domesticity and the undomesticated increasingly blur for cohabitants of Vancouver Island, home to North America’s densest cougar population, predatorial problems become more and more pressing. Rosemary-Claire Collard responds on a pragmatic plane, arguing that the encounter between human and cougar is only ever destructive, that contact results in death and almost always for the cougar. Advocating for vigilance in policing boundaries separating cougar from civilization, therefore, she looks to Foucault’s analysis of modern biopower in the first volume (...)
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  5. Classical Cats: The Rise and Fall of the Sacred Cat. [REVIEW]N. G. Wilson - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (1):178-178.
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  6. Review of Jean-Christophe Bailly, The Animal Side. [REVIEW]Chandler D. Rogers - 2016 - Between the Species 19 (1):215-220.
  7. Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing.Scott D. Churchill - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (sup1):1-13.
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  8. The Animal Inside: Essays at the Intersection of Philosophical Anthropology and Animal Studies.Geoffrey Dierckxsens, Rudmer Bijlsma, Michael Begun & Thomas Kiefer (eds.) - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A team of renowned philosophers and a new generation of thinkers come together to offer the first book-length examination of the relationship between philosophical anthropology and animal studies.
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  9. Becoming Animal in Michel de Montaigne’s Views. Toward an Animal Community.Krzysztof Skonieczny - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):87-102.
    It is a recent tendency to read certain pre- and early-modern thinkers as “anticipatory critics” of modernity; the name of Michel de Montaigne often comes up in this context. Most of the critical approaches treat Montaigne like a pre-Rousseau proto-romantic which is indeed is an important part of Montaigne’s thinking. However, as I show in this paper, his Essays also allow for a different interpretation. Namely, I demonstrate that 1) Montaigne’s appraisal of Nature is far from a romantic-idyllic one; 2) (...)
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  10. Domesticating Animals: Description of a Certain Disturbance.Szymon Wróbel - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):173-191.
    In my text, I ask—investigating mainly the works of Freud, Lévi-Strauss, and Kafka—if humanity empowered by kinship or even contamination with other species would be a sick society, frail and ill-selected, or whether it would rather be a society which is active and audacious, devoid of the traces of resentment towards other living beings. I analyze the mono-individual species on the basis of examples which are clinical , literary , and also those borrowed from mass culture in order to illustrate (...)
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  11. Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme "autres moi".Christiane Bailey - 2013 - Chiasmi International: Trilingual Studies Concerning Merleau-Ponty’s Thought 15:219-250.
    Alors que les phénoménologues prétendent avoir dépassé le solipsisme, la plupart n’ont en fait que repousser les frontières de l’intersubjectivité des individus humains aux individus des autres espèces. Pourtant, Husserl reconnaît l’existence d’une intersubjectivité interspécifique, c’est-à-dire d’une intersubjectivité dépassant les limites de l’espèce. Il va même jusqu’à affirmer qu’on comprend parfois mieux un animal familier qu’un humain étranger. Toutefois, même s’il admet que plusieurs animaux sont capables d’une vie de conscience subjective et qu’ils vivent dans un monde de sens partagé, (...)
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  12. Why Do We Go to the Zoo?: Communication, Animals, and the Cultural-Historical Experience of Zoos.Erik A. Garrett - 2013 - Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book is a phenomenological investigation of the zoo visit experience. Why Do We Go to the Zoo? is rooted in Husserlian phenomenology and focuses on the communicative interactions between humans and animals in the zoo setting.
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  13. Marx on Humans and Animals.Ted Benton - 1984 - In Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.), Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge. pp. 235.
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  14. The Birth of the Herd.Dimitrij Mlekuž - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):150-161.
    One of the most significant contributions of archaeology to the studies of human-animal relations is the concept of the “domestication” of non-human animals. Domestication is often seen as a specific human-animal relation that explains the ways people and animals interact. However, I argue, that “domestication” does not explain anything but has to be explained or “reassembled” by focusing on the many historically specific ways human and animals live together. Thus, the paper tackles the emergence of a “herd”, an assembly of (...)
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  15. Der Mensch, das Tier. [REVIEW]Kristin Hagen - 2011 - Philosophische Rundschau 58 (2):139 - 157.
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  16. Why Was Thomas A. Sebeok Not a Cognitive Ethologist? From “Animal Mind” to “Semiotic Self”.Timo Maran - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):315-329.
    In the current debates about zoosemiotics its relations with the neighbouring disciplines are a relevant topic. The present article aims to analyse the complex relations between zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology with special attention to their establishers: Thomas A. Sebeok and Donald R. Griffin. It is argued that zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology have common roots in comparative studies of animal communication in the early 1960s. For supporting this claim Sebeok’s works are analysed, the classical and philosophical periods of his zoosemiotic views (...)
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  17. From Blubber and Baleen to Buddha of the Deep: The Rise of the Metaphysical Whale.Frank Zelko - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (1):91-108.
    Human attitudes to various nonhuman animals have varied considerably\nacross cultures and throughout time. While some of our responses are\nundoubtedly instinctive and universal-a visceral fear of large\ncarnivores or the feeling of spontaneous warmth for creatures exhibiting\nhigh degrees of neoteny-it is clear that our attitude toward specific\nspecies is largely shaped by our innate anthropomorphism: that is, when\nwe think about animals, we are also thinking about ourselves. There are\nfew better examples of this than the shifting attitudes toward whales\nand dolphins throughout the 20th century, (...)
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  18. The Lived Revolution: Solidarity with the Body in Pain as the New Political Universal.Katerina Kolozova - 2010 - Evro-Balkan Press.
    The book explores the themes of a) “radical concepts” in politics (inspired by François Laruelle’s “non-Marxism” and “non-philosophy,” developed in accordance with Badiouan and Žižekian “realism”); b) politically relevant and applicable epistemologies of “Thought’s Correlating with the Real” (Laruelle), inspired by Laruelle, Badiou and Žižek and c) the possibility of hybridization of the epistemic stance of “radical concept” with the politics of grief and “identification with the suffering itself” proposed by Judith Butler. Radical concepts, the political vision and the theory (...)
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  19. Between Explanation and Understanding: Hermeneutical Circles, Animal Minds and Internal Causes of Behavior.A. M. Karremans & P. Sleurink - unknown
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Non-Human Animals, Misc
  1. Evolutionary origin of emotions: Continuity between animals and humans.Zorana Todorovic - 2014 - Glasnik Za Društvene Nauke 6 (2014):45-62.
    This paper discusses the evolutionary origin and adaptive functions of emotions, in line with contemporary evolutionary psychology. Drawing upon Charles Darwin’s study of emotional expressions, it is argued that there is an evolutionary continuity among animals in emotional capacities, and that the differences between humans and animals are differences in degree and not in kind. The focus is on basic or primary emotions (joy, fear, sadness, anger), as it has been consistently shown that they are universal and shared among many (...)
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