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  1. The functions of shame in Nietzsche.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In Raffaele Rodogno & Alessandra Fussi (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Shame. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Nietzsche talks about shame [scham*, schmach*, schand*] in all of his published and authorized works, from The Birth of Tragedy to Ecce Homo. He refers to shame in over one hundred passages – at least five times as often as he refers to resentment/ressentiment. Yet the scholarly literature on Nietzsche and shame includes just a handful of publications, while the literature on Nietzsche and resentment includes over a thousand. Arguably, this disproportionate engagement has been driven by the fact that English (...)
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  2. Digital humanities for history of philosophy: A case study on Nietzsche.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In T. Neilson L. Levenberg D. Rheems & M. Thomas (ed.), Handbook of Methods in the Digital Humanities. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Nietzsche promises to “translate man back into nature,” but it remains unclear what he meant by this and to what extent he succeeded at it. To help come to grips with Nietzsche’s conceptions of drive (Trieb), instinct (Instinkt) and virtue (Tugend and/or Keuschheit), I develop novel digital humanities methods to systematically track his use of these terms, constructing a near-comprehensive catalogue of what he takes these dispositions to be and how he thinks they are related. Nietzsche individuate drives and instincts (...)
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  3. Genealogy Revisited. [REVIEW]Mark Alfano - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Philosophy.
    “Another Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality?” one might be excused for asking at the sight of Simon May’s new collection. This volume has to contend for shelf space with homonymic monographs by Lawrence Hatab (2008) and David Owen (2007), as well as Daniel Conway’s (2008) Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals, a compilation of the same name edited by Christa Acampora (2006), and Brian Leiter’s Nietzsche on Morality (2002). Add to this that Hatab contributes to May’s collection, Owen and (...)
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  4. How one becomes what one is: The case for a Nietzschean conception of character development.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In Iskra Fileva (ed.), Perspectives on Character. Oxford University Press.
    Gone are the heady days when Bernard Williams (1993) could get away with saying that “Nietzsche is not a source of philosophical theories” (p. 4). The last two decades have witnessed a flowering of research that aims to interpret, elucidate, and defend Nietzsche’s theories about science, the mind, and morality. This paper is one more blossom in that efflorescence. What I want to argue is that Nietzsche theorized three important and surprising moral psychological insights that have been born out by (...)
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  5. Nietzsche on humility and modesty.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - In Justin Steinberg (ed.), Humility: A History. Oxford University Press.
    Beginning with the Untimely Meditations (1873) and continuing until his final writings of 1888-9, Nietzsche refers to humility (Demuth or a cognate) in fifty-two passages and to modesty (Bescheidenheit or a cognate) in one hundred and four passages, yet there are only four passages that refer to both terms. Moreover, perhaps surprisingly, he often speaks positively of modesty, especially in epistemic contexts. These curious facts might be expected to lead scholars to explore what Nietzsche thinks of humility and modesty, but (...)
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  6. Strangers to ourselves: a Nietzschean challenge to the badness of suffering.Nicolas Delon - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    Is suffering really bad? The late Derek Parfit argued that we all have reasons to want to avoid future agony and that suffering is in itself bad both for the one who suffers and impersonally. Nietzsche denied that suffering was intrinsically bad and that its value could even be impersonal. This paper has two aims. It argues against what I call ‘Realism about the Value of Suffering’ by drawing from a broadly Nietzschean debunking of our evaluative attitudes, showing that a (...)
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  7. Nietzsche on Magnanimity, Greatness, and Greatness of Soul.Andrew Huddleston - forthcoming - In Sophia Vasalou (ed.), The Measure of Greatness: Philosophers on Magnanimity. Oxford, UK:
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  8. Sexism is Exhausting: Nietzsche and the Emotional Dynamics of Sexist Oppression.Kaitlyn Creasy - 2024 - In Rebecca Bamford & Allison Merrick (eds.), Nietzsche and Politicized Identities. Albany: State University of New York Press.
    In this paper, I examine a set of theoretical tools Nietzsche offers for making sense of the emotional dynamics and psychophysiological impacts of sexist oppression. Specifically, I indicate how Nietzsche’s account of the social and cultural production of emotional experience (i.e. his account of the transpersonal nature of emotional experience) can serve as a conceptual resource for understanding the detrimental emotional impacts of social norms, beliefs, and practices that systematically devalue certain of one’s ends and interests.
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  9. Plato and Nietzsche on the Ideal Soul.Mattia Riccardi - 2024 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 55 (1):27-48.
    Nietzsche scholars have remarked on the similarities between his conception of the ideal soul and that of Plato. This article provides a systematic examination of this issue. The first part of the article demonstrates that there is in fact a substantive convergence between their views. However, this result is puzzling given that Nietzsche accuses Plato’s moral psychology of being deeply ascetic. Thus, the second part of the article focuses on this charge. Though the textual evidence provided by Plato’s dialogues remains (...)
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  10. Nietzsche on Trust and Mistrust.Mark Alfano - 2023 - In Mark Alfano, David Collins & Iris Jovanovic (eds.), Perspectives on Trust in the History of Philosophy. Lanham: Lexington.
    Nietzsche talks about trust [vertraue*] and mistrust [misstrau*] in all of his published and authorized works, from The Birth of Tragedy to Ecce Homo. He refers to trust in 90 passages and mistrust in 101 – approximately ten times as often as he refers to resentment/ressentiment. Yet the scholarly literature on Nietzsche and trust includes just a handful of publications. Worse still, I have been unable to find a single publication devoted to Nietzsche and mistrust. This chapter aims to fill (...)
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  11. Psychology as a First Principle? Self-Love and the Will to Power in La Rochefoucauld and Nietzsche.Jiani Fan - 2023 - The European Legacy 29 (1):1-19.
    Both Nietzsche and La Rochefoucauld rejected metaphysical principles, such as the Kantian moral imperatives, and adopted psychology as their first philosophy. In this article I explore their views of self-love and of the will to power as the first principles of human motivation. Although both thinkers reduce actions to egoistic motives, they define the human drives and passions differently. While Nietzsche criticizes La Rochefoucauld’s view of a self-love-oriented intention as the principal cause of deeds, his interpretation is reductionist seeing that (...)
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  12. Nietzsche, Virtue, and Education: Cultivating the Sovereign Individual Through a New Type of Education.Steven A. Stolz - 2023 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 43 (1):31-45.
    From a prima facie point of view, Nietzsche’s use of virtue may appear to be a form of virtue ethics. Certainly, this is one position that has been established within the secondary literature; however, I argue that a more fruitful philosophical reading is to view his use of virtue as a part of his drive psychology. Indeed, what makes Nietzsche’s philosophical psychology relevant to this topic, is the way in which he characterises the “sovereign individual” as an agent that is (...)
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  13. Nietzsche’s Moral Psychology by Mark Alfano. [REVIEW]Kaitlyn Creasy - 2022 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 53 (2):202-210.
    If you're a Nietzsche scholar and you haven't heard of Mark Alfano's book, you're not paying attention. Published in 2019, Nietzsche's Moral Psychology has already been reviewed by leading Nietzsche scholars in numerous venues, dissected in a book symposium published in this very journal, and featured on a popular philosophy blog's book review forum. Its broad influence is already evidenced by the extensive scholarly debate it has provoked and the predominantly positive evaluations it has received, and its impact is particularly (...)
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  14. Nietzsche on the Sociality of Emotional Experience.Kaitlyn Creasy - 2022 - European Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):748-768.
    In this paper, I explore the sociality of emotional experience in the work of Friedrich Nietzsche. Specifically, I describe four key mechanisms through which an individual's sociocultural context shapes her emotional experience on Nietzsche's view—emotional contagion as habitual affective mimicry, the production of emotions' felt character through the assimilation of dominant social beliefs and norms, affective interpretation à la Christopher Fowles, and the imposition of dominant notions of emotional appropriateness—fleshing out a dimension of Nietzsche's thought which is largely taken for (...)
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  15. Nietzsche on Self-Reverence.Joel A. Van Fossen - 2022 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 53 (2):181-201.
    Respect and self-respect are the cornerstone motivations in Kantian moral psychology. But “respect” is an ambiguous term. As Stephen Darwall has argued, sometimes respect refers to a constraint on practical reason, but at other times it refers to a person-directed pro-attitude. In this article, I argue that this distinction is a problem regarding self-respect since self-respect, in the latter sense, lacks warrant. Furthermore, I discuss Nietzsche’s conception of “self-reverence,” which in some ways serves as a replacement for Kantian self-respect in (...)
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  16. Os riscos de se tentar conferir plena cidadania teórica ao pensamento ético de Nietzsche: uma discussão de "Nietzsche and Contemporary Ethics" de Simon Robertson.Rogerio Lopes - 2022 - Estudos Nietzsche 13 (1):115-140.
    The aim of the present article is to display and debate the main interpretive and philosophical claims defended by Simon Robertson in his Nietzsche and Contemporary Ethics. Robertson presents innovative and stimulating arguments that might interest primarily readers willing to better understand the Nietzschean moral theory and researchers interested in broader issues of contemporary moral theory, particularly in the analytic tradition. The author covers the main debates in the area, taking sides in disputes going on in normative theory, metaethics, moral (...)
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  17. On willing and the phantasy of empathy.Vasfi Onur Özen - 2022 - Dissertation, University of Kansas
    The ultimate goal of this dissertation is to expose Friedrich Nietzsche’s critically neglected account of empathic concern. In what follows, I will briefly present the main ideas and purpose of the project, and include necessary background. -/- Since a significant portion of Nietzsche’s work on moral psychology and ethics is directed toward naturalizing and conceptually redefining the metaphysical implications of Arthur Schopenhauer’s account of compassion, I begin by critically examining Schopenhauer’s metaphysics. At its simplest, Schopenhauer’s narrative goes as follows: the (...)
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  18. Zarathustra’s Moral Psychology.Neil Sinhababu - 2022 - In Keith Ansell-Pearson & Paul S. Loeb (eds.), Nietzsche's ‘Thus Spoke Zarathustra': A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press. pp. 148-167.
    In Thus Spoke Zarathustra, Nietzsche presents passion as constituting human agency. He encountered this Humean view in Schopenhauer, and recognized its explanatory advantages over Platonic and Kantian rationalism. Zarathustra's poetic speeches anticipate and address contemporary objections to the view that passion constitutes agency. "On the Despisers of the Body" explains why understanding the self as constituted by passion provides better explanations of reasoning, value judgment, and the unity of the self than Christine Korsgaard's neo-Kantian view. "On Enjoying and Suffering the (...)
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  19. Nietzsche's virtues: curiosity, courage, pathos of distance, sense of humor, and solitude.Mark Alfano - 2021 - In Christoph Halbig & Felix Timmermann (eds.), The Handbook of Virtue and Virtue Ethics.
  20. Nietzsche’s Virtues: Curiosity, Courage, Pathos of Distance, Sense of Humor, and Solitude.Mark Alfano - 2021 - In Christoph Halbig & Felix Timmermann (eds.), Handbuch Tugend Und Tugendethik. Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden. pp. 271-286.
    The contours of Nietzsche’s socio-moral framework are idiosyncratic when compared to contemporary neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics. Nietzsche starts with a naturalistic conception of drives, instincts, and types of people. He then moves in a normative direction by identifying some drives and instincts as virtues – at least for certain types of people in particular social and cultural contexts. Much of Nietzsche’s understanding of virtue must therefore be understood relative to a type of person and the context in which they find themselves. (...)
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  21. The Nietzschean Mind ed. by Paul Katsafanas. [REVIEW]Matthew Bennett - 2021 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 52 (1):164-170.
    Paul Katsafanas has put together a valuable collection of essays covering many of the main areas of contemporary Anglophone, philosophically oriented Nietzsche scholarship. The title of the book may lead some to expect a volume that deals exclusively with Nietzsche's philosophy of mind or moral psychology, but in fact its themes are more varied. The twenty-eight chapters address Nietzsche's views on philosophical and moral psychology, the self, value, society and culture, metaphysics, and philosophy itself, and the book includes a welcome (...)
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  22. Nietzsche and Experimental philosophy. Studies and perspectives. Nietzsche y la filosofía experimental. Estudios y perspectivas.Osman Choque - 2021 - Praxis Filosófica 53:109-132.
    The expression experimental philosophy has taken on a lively interest in recent research on Nietzsche, as the growing shows number of interpreters. This reflection occupied a small place in the discussions at the end of the 20th century; a situation that changed dramatically at the beginning of our century. To understanding the questions that revolve around this philosophy, it is necessary to consider its limits and scope and, above all, the space it occupies in the work of the German thinker. (...)
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  23. Ressentiment.Andrew Huddleston - 2021 - Ethics 131 (4):670-696.
    Nietzsche famously discusses a psychological condition he calls ressentiment, a condition involving toxic, vengeful anger. I offer a free-standing theory in philosophical psychology of the familiar...
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  24. Recent Work on Nietzsche’s Moral Psychology and Ethics.Paul Katsafanas - 2021 - Nietzsche Studien 50 (1):361-381.
    A review of the following for books, plus some reflections on Nietzsche's moral psychology and ethics: Alfano: Nietzsche’s Moral Psychology (Cambridge University Press 2019). Leiter: Moral Psychology with Nietzsche (Oxford University Press 2019) Ridley: The Deed is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action (Oxford University Press 2018) Stern: Nietzsche’s Ethics (Cambridge University Press 2020) These four books are broadly on Nietzsche’s moral psychology and ethics. The books differ widely in their aspirations: Ridley’s is focused solely on Nietzsche’s notion of action, (...)
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  25. Moral Psychology with Nietzsche by Brian Leiter.Paul S. Loeb - 2021 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 59 (1):160-161.
    Brian Leiter’s second book on Nietzsche brings together ideas and arguments that have already had a significant influence on the field through their earlier formulations in his articles from the past two decades. It is thus indispensable reading for anyone interested in Leiter’s evolving project of showing that Nietzsche has the correct naturalistic approach to issues in moral philosophy and moral psychology. As usual with Leiter’s scholarship, this monograph is extremely clear, densely argued, and philosophically sophisticated.Leiter nicely frames this book (...)
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  26. Moral Psychology with Nietzsche, by Brian Leiter. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, 224 pp., ISBN: 9780199696505, Hardcover $65.00. [REVIEW]Alexander Prescott-Couch - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):260-265.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  27. Brian Leiter, Moral Psychology with Nietzsche.Avery Snelson - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):256-261.
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  28. Moral Psychology with Nietzsche, by Brian Leiter. [REVIEW]Tom Stern - 2021 - Mind 130 (518):661-671.
    Moral Psychology with Nietzsche, by Brian Leiter. Oxford: OUP, 2019. Pp. x + 198.
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  29. Nietzsche, Mitleid, and Moral Imagination.Keith Ansell-Pearson & Rebecca Bamford - 2020 - In Carol Diethe, Keith Ansell‐Pearson & Rebecca Bamford (eds.), Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy, Ethics, and the Passion of Knowledge. Chichester, UK: Wiley. pp. 93–113.
    This chapter examines Nietzsche's thinking on the concept of Mitleid and discusses the complexities of translating this concept into English in Dawn. It describes how Nietzsche's critical engagement with this concept is importantly dependent on the role of drives in his wider moral psychology. The chapter also examines the role of mood and social transmission of feeling in his critique, arguing that these factors play key roles in Nietzsche's development of a substantial critique of an ethic of compassion, and in (...)
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  30. Digital Humanities and the History of Philosophy: The Case of Nietzsche's Moral Psychology.Rebecca Bamford - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):241-249.
    ABSTRACT This article, invited for presentation to the North American Nietzsche Society at the 2020 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, is a commentary on Mark Alfano's 2019 monograph, Nietzsche's Moral Psychology. It critically discusses Alfano's synoptic digital humanities approach and examines the efficacy of two aspects of his argument about Nietzsche's philosophy developed using this methodology: the connection between life and will to power, and the role of speech acts.
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  31. Virtue and Community in Mark Alfano's Nietzsche's Moral Psychology.Rachel Cristy - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):250-255.
    ABSTRACT This article, invited for presentation to the North American Nietzsche Society at the 2020 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, is a commentary on Mark Alfano's 2019 monograph, Nietzsche's Moral Psychology. I commend Alfano's productive, innovative use of digital humanities methods as well as his more traditional textual interpretation. But I raise some doubts about Alfano's proposed criterion of “external integration” for a drive to qualify as a Nietzschean virtue: the claim that if a drive systematically and (...)
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  32. On the Normativity of Nietzsche's Will to Power.Ian D. Dunkle - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):188-211.
    A prominent tradition in Nietzsche scholarship reads his views about will to power as a psychological thesis and his claims about the value of power as an attempt to derive normativity from psychological necessity. This article shows that these interpretations have failed to articulate a cogent reading faithful to Nietzsche’s texts, and so casts doubt on such an approach. My argument bears not only on how we read Nietzsche, but also on the viability of one recent constitutivist reading. After presenting (...)
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  33. Exemplars, Institutions, and Self-Knowledge in Schopenhauer as Educator.Sacha Golob - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 52 (1):46-66.
    As a face in the mirror, so the morals of men are easily corrected with an exemplar.As Christopher Janaway observed, “the topic of Schopenhauer as Educator is really education rather than Schopenhauer.”2 Indeed, Nietzsche described it as addressing a “problem of education without equal”.3 This article reconstructs the pedagogical challenge and solution presented by Nietzsche in that text. It is obvious that Schopenhauer’s example is meant to underpin Nietzsche’s new pedagogy; what is less obvious is how exactly that exemplary role (...)
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  34. Moral Psychology with Nietzsche by Brian Leiter.Andrew Huddleston - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):288-293.
    Brian Leiter's Moral Psychology with Nietzsche draws together seven of his previous papers, expands and updates them, and weaves them together into a unified naturalist line of interpretation. The fundamental positions largely remain the same. The reader already familiar with Leiter's work will thus not be in for major surprises, but will have much to learn from reading the new exegetical and philosophical details in this book.The "moral psychology" indicated in the book's title is construed very broadly to encompass, for (...)
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  35. Nietzsche contra Sublimation.Eli I. Lichtenstein - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (4):755-778.
    Many commentators have claimed that Nietzsche views the “sublimation” (Sublimierung) of drives as a positive achievement. Against this tradition, I argue that, on the dominant if not universal Nietzschean use of Sublimierung and its cognates, sublimation is just a broad psychological analogue of the traditional (al)chemical process: the “vaporization” of drives into a finer or lighter state, figuratively if not literally. This can yield ennobling elevation, or purity in a positive sense—the intensified “sublimate” of an unrefined original sample. But it (...)
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  36. Comments on Mark Alfano's Nietzsche's Moral Psychology.Bernard Reginster - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (2):256-264.
    ABSTRACT This article, invited for presentation to the North American Nietzsche Society at the 2020 Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, is a commentary on Mark Alfano's 2019 monograph, Nietzsche's Moral Psychology. It focuses, first, on the method adopted in the book (a particular combination of “distant reading” through the use of digital tools with close reading) and, second, on two key substantive issues: the analysis of the Nietzschean concepts of drive and virtue respectively.
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  37. Nietzsche's Moral Psychology, by Mark Alfano. [REVIEW]Mattia Riccardi - 2020 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2.
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  38. Nietzsche's Moral Psychology.Mark Alfano - 2019 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Introduction -/- 1 Précis -/- 2 Methodology: Introducing digital humanities to the history of philosophy 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Core constructs 2.3 Operationalizing the constructs 2.4 Querying the Nietzsche Source 2.5 Cleaning the data 2.6 Visualizations and preliminary analysis 2.6.1 Visualization of the whole corpus 2.6.2 Book visualizations 2.7 Summary -/- Nietzsche’s Socio-Moral Framework -/- 3 From instincts and drives to types 3.1 Introduction 3.2 The state of the art on drives, instincts, and types 3.2.1 Drives 3.2.2 Instincts 3.2.3 Types 3.3 (...)
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  39. Quando a ciência é ídolo: um comentário crítico sobre a psicologia moral nietzschiana de Leiter.Jonas Backendorf - 2019 - Cadernos Nietzsche 40 (3):189-213.
    Resumo: A finalidade deste artigo é bastante pontual e específica: evidenciar os problemas do tratamento acrítico dado à psicologia por Brian Leiter em seu recente Moral Psychology with Nietzsche. O autor inclui, sem se empenhar em qualquer discussão metodológica, a psicologia no rol do que chama de “ciências bem-sucedidas”, tomadas como i) certificadoras do m-naturalismo nietzschiano; ii) dotadas de primazia sobre a própria filosofia na determinação do que é um “raciocínio filosófico” significativo; iii) fornecedoras de um amplo e inconteste corpo (...)
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  40. The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious, written by Paul Katsafanas. [REVIEW]Christopher Fowles - 2019 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (3):375-378.
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  41. Moral Psychology with Nietzsche.Brian Leiter - 2019 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    Brian Leiter draws on empirical psychology to defend a set of radical ideas from Nietzsche: there is no objectively true morality, there is no free will, no one is ever morally responsible, and our conscious thoughts play almost no significant role in our actions. Nietzsche emerges as not just a great philosopher but a prescient psychologist.
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  42. The innocence of becoming: Nietzsche against guilt.Brian Leiter - 2019 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (1):70-92.
    ABSTRACTI offer an interpretation of Nietzsche's striking idea of ‘the innocence of becoming’, and a partial defense of its import, namely, that no one is ever morally responsible or guilty for what they do and that many of the so-called reactive attitudes are misplaced. I focus primarily, though not exclusively, on the arguments as set out in Twilight of the Idols. First, there is Nietzsche's hypothesis, partly psychological and partly historical or anthropological, that the ideas of ‘free’ action or free (...)
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  43. L'aurora della psicologia morale. La psicologia morale di Nietzsche e alcune recenti indagini empiriche.Francesco Margoni - 2019 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 10 (2):164-176.
    Riassunto: Questo lavoro mira a un confronto tra la psicologia morale di Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche e l’approccio socio-intuizionista al giudizio morale proposto da Jonathan Haidt. Questo confronto metterà in luce somiglianze notevoli tra i due modelli. Il lavoro intende inoltre chiarire quali implicazioni Nietzsche trae dalla sua descrizione della psicologia umana e quali cambiamenti di prospettiva egli esorta a operare rispetto alla comprensione di noi stessi come “esseri morali”. Parole chiave: Giudizio morale; Sviluppo morale; Intuizionismo; Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche; Jonathan Haidt (...)
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  44. Nietzsche, Self-Disgust, and Disgusting Morality.Joel A. Van Fossen - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (1):79-105.
    Among other things, Nietzsche considers himself a psychologist, and many of his ideas about human behaviors, dispositions, and attitudes are empirical and falsifiable. As readers of Nietzsche, we should hope that he got some of his psychological facts right. I agree with Joshua Knobe and Brian Leiter when they argue that "neglect of Nietzsche in moral psychology is no longer an option for those philosophers who accept that moral psychology should be grounded in real psychology."1 This article aims at furthering (...)
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  45. A Schooling in Contempt: Emotions and the pathos of distance.Mark Alfano - 2018 - In Paul Katsafanas (ed.), Routledge Philosophical Minds: The Nietzschean Mind. Routledge.
    Nietzsche scholars have developed an interest in his use of “thick” moral psychological concepts such as virtues and emotions. This development coincides with a renewed interest among both philosophers and social scientists in virtues, the emotions, and moral psychology more generally. Contemporary work in empirical moral psychology posits contempt and disgust as both basic emotions and moral foundations of normative codes. While virtues can be individuated in various ways, one attractive principle of individuation is to index them to characteristic emotions (...)
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  46. Nietzsche’s polychrome exemplarism.Mark Alfano - 2018 - Ethics and Politics 2:45-64.
    In this paper, I develop an account of Nietzschean exemplarism. Drawing on my previous work, I argue that an agent’s instincts and other drives constitute her psychological type. In this framework, a drive counts as a virtue to the extent that it is well-calibrated with the rest of the agent’s psychic economy and meets with sentiments of approbation from the agent’s community. Different virtues are fitting for different types, and different types elicit different discrete emotions in people with fine-tuned affective (...)
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  47. The Nietzschean self: moral psychology, agency, and the unconscious. [REVIEW]Mark Alfano - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):637-640.
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  48. The epistemic function of contempt and laughter in Nietzsche.Mark Alfano - 2018 - In Michelle Mason (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Contempt. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Interpreters have noticed that Nietzsche, in addition to sometimes being uproariously funny, reflects more on laughter and having a sense of humor than almost any other philosopher. Several scholars have further noticed that Nietzschean laughter sometimes seems to have an epistemic function. In this chapter, I assume that Nietzsche is a pluralist about the functions of humor and laughter, and seek to establish the uses he finds for them. I offer an interpretation according to which he tactically uses humor and (...)
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  49. Moral physiology and vivisection of the soul: why does Nietzsche criticize the life sciences?Ian D. Dunkle - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 61 (1):62-81.
    Recent scholarship has shown Nietzsche to offer an original and insightful moral psychology centering on a motivational feature he calls ‘will to power.’ In many places, though, Nietzsche presents will to power differently, as the ‘essence of life,’ an account of ‘organic function,’ even offering it as a correction to physiologists. This paper clarifies the scope and purpose of will to power by identifying the historical physiological view at which Nietzsche directs his criticisms and by identifying his purpose in doing (...)
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  50. Power, Resentment, and Self-Preservation: Nietzsche’s Moral Psychology as a Critique of Trump.Aaron Harper & Eric Schaaf - 2018 - In Marc Benjamin Sable & Angel Jaramillo Torres (eds.), Trump and Political Philosophy: Patriotism, Cosmopolitanism and Civic Virtue. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 257-280.
    We use Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morality as a touchstone for comprehending Trump’s appeal and victory. Following Nietzsche’s concerns, the most noteworthy puzzle is that of Trump’s peculiar popularity, especially given his impolitic statements and policy proposals that often appear in tension with the interests of his voter base. While Nietzsche’s discussions of power and resentment would seem obvious starting points to examine the success of Trump and Trumpism, we contend that these provide largely superficial and, at best, incomplete (...)
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