Moral Psychology

Edited by Joshua May (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
About this topic
Summary Moral psychology is the study of phenomena such as moral thought, feeling, reasoning, and motivation. For example, in moral psychology, one wonders what role reasoning and emotions play in generating moral judgment. Similarly, one asks whether moral motivation has its source in reason or rather sentiments or desire. Other key issues include: the tight connection between moral judgment and motivation, altruism versus egoism, character, and even the evolution of moral capacities.  The topics reveal the partly empirical nature of the field, which makes it of necessity interdisciplinary, even though one can pursue many interesting issue from the armchair. Many of these philosophical problems have ramifications in others areas, especially metaethics. If, for example, moral judgment is grounded in sentiment, then this may support a non-cognitivists theory, which threatens moral realism.
Key works Issues in moral psychology have been dominant in the history of philosophy. Nadelhoffer et al 2010 provide a collection of key historical as well as contemporary readings. Focusing on more recent work, Smith's 1994 book has been highly influential in the literature, from moral judgment to motivation. Compare also Nagel 1970 and Korsgaard 1996. On the empirical side, Sinnott-Armstrong 2008 provides a comprehensive state of the art with three volumes full of new articles and replies from prominent philosophers and scientists. 
Introductions A brief introduction to some topics in moral psychology is in Slote 1998. Rosati's (2006) entry on moral motivation provides an introduction to one cluster of key issues in moral psychology. For a way into the empirical work, see Doris & Stich 2008, May 2017, and Doris & 2010.
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:History/traditions: Moral Psychology

15375 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 15375
Material to categorize
  1. Philosophical Naturalism and Empirical Approaches to Philosophy.Jonathan Y. Tsou - forthcoming - In Marcus Rossberg (ed.), The Cambridge Handbook of Analytic Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This chapter examines the influence of the empirical sciences (e.g., physics, biology, psychology) in contemporary analytic philosophy, with focus on philosophical theories that are guided by findings from the empirical sciences. Scientific approaches to philosophy follow a tradition of philosophical naturalism associated with Quine, which strives to ally philosophical methods and theories more closely with the empirical sciences and away from a priori theorizing and conceptual analysis.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Practical Cognition as Volition.Jeremy David Fix - forthcoming - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy.
    Practical cognitivism is the view that practical reason is the self-conscious will and that practical cognition is self-conscious volition. This essay addresses two puzzles for practical cognitivism. In akratic action, I act as I understand is illegitimate and not as I understand is legitimate. In permissible action, I act as I understand is legitimate and also do not act as I understand is legitimate. In both types of action, practical cognition seems to come apart from volition. How, then, can practical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Nietzsche: Politics as First Philosophy.Donovan Miyasaki - forthcoming - Palgrave Macmillan.
    (Part one of a two-volume study) Notorious for his vehement criticisms of egalitarianism and democracy, Nietzsche has been dismissed as an apolitical thinker at best, a dangerous forefather of fascism at worst. Nietzsche: Politics as First Philosophy argues that Nietzsche’s moral philosophy is a political philosophy in disguise. He reinvents the very foundations of political theory, grounding it in a deterministic psychology and completely rejecting moral means of human enhancement, opening new avenues for political thought beyond the narrow scope of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Measuring Impartial Beneficence: A Kantian Perspective on the Oxford Utilitarianism Scale.Emilian Mihailov - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-16.
    To capture genuine utilitarian tendencies, developed the Oxford Utilitarianism Scale based on two subscales, which measure the commitment to impartial beneficence and the willingness to cause harm for the greater good. In this article, I argue that the impartial beneficence subscale, which breaks ground with previous research on utilitarian moral psychology, does not distinctively measure utilitarian moral judgment. I argue that Kantian ethics captures the all-encompassing impartial concern for the well-being of all human beings. The Oxford Utilitarianism Scale draws, in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Does Ought Imply Can?Miklos Kurthy - 2017 - PLoS ONE 12 (4):e0175206.
    Most philosophers believe that a person can have an obligation only insofar as she is able to fulfil it, a principle generally referred to as “Ought Implies Can”. Arguably, this principle reflects something basic about the ordinary concept of obligation. However, in a paper published recently in this journal, Wesley Buckwalter and John Turri presented evidence for the conclusion that ordinary people in fact reject that principle. With a series of studies, they claimed to have demonstrated that, in people’s judgements, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  6. Samuel Beckett, Pragmatic Contradiction and The Vestiges of Practical Necessity.Josep E. Corbi - 2016 - In Tomas Koblízek & Petr Kotátko (eds.), Chaos and Form. Prague, Czechia: pp. 202-228.
    This essay examine Samuel Beckett's *Trilogy to specify the conditions under which we could make sense of practical necessity. Among other things, I will show how Ajax' must is connected to Mol/oy's attempt to visit his mother and to the need to keep talking that both Molloy and the Unnamable share. I will conclude that their dislocated pursuit of certainty reveal - among other things - how the conditions under which practical necessity can be properly experienced have been extirpated from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Atonement, by Eleonore Stump [Review Article].Rolfe King - 2020 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Review article on Eleonore Stump: Atonement, Oxford University Press, 2019.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Dynamics of Responsibility Judgment: Joint Role of Dependence and Transference Causal Explanations.Sofia Bonicalzi, Eugenia Kulakova, Chiara Brozzo, Sam Gilbert & Patrick Haggard - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology.
    Reasoning about underlying causal relations drives responsibility judgments: agents are held responsible for the outcomes they cause through their behaviors. Two main causal reasoning approaches exist: dependence theories emphasize statistical relations between causes and effects, while transference theories emphasize mechanical transmission of energy. Recently, pluralistic or hybrid models, combining both approaches, have emerged as promising psychological frameworks. In this paper, we focus on causal reasoning as involved in third-party judgements of responsibility and on related judgments of intention and control. In (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Love, Friendship, and Moral Motivation.Carme Isern-Mas - forthcoming - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology.
    The love that we feel for our friends plays an essential role in both our moral motivation to act towards them; and in our moral obligations towards them, that is, in our special duties. We articulate our proposal as a reply to Stephen Darwall’s second-person proposal, which we take to be a contemporary representative of the Kantian view. According to this view, love does not have a necessary role neither in moral motivation, nor in moral obligation; just a complementary one. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Häpeän filosofiasta.Valtteri Viljanen - 2011 - In Jyrki Korkeila, Kaisla Joutsenniemi, Eila Sailas & Jorma Oksanen (eds.), Irti häpeäleimasta. Helsinki: Duodecim. pp. 54–62.
    [The title in English: "On the Philosophy of Shame."] Viimeaikaisessa filosofianhistoriallisessa tutkimuksessa on kiinnitetty yhä enemmän huomiota siihen, että ainakin osa tunteistamme on muuttunut historian saatossa. Lieneekin ilmeistä, että tunne-elämämme on merkittävässä määrin erilaista kuin esimerkiksi voimakkaasti kristinuskon leimaamalla keskiajalla. Toisinaan näkee väitettävän, että myös suhteemme häpeään olisi muuttunut varsin radikaalisti tai että se olisi jopa kokonaan kadonnut esimerkiksi suomalaisesta nykykulttuurista. Tämä olisi yllättävää, sillä häpeällä on vahvat perinteet kulttuurissamme. Häpeän pitkän historian lisäksi myös sen luonteen filosofinen analyysi antaa viitteitä (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Difficulty of Understanding: Complexity and Simplicity in Moral Psychological Description.Camilla Kronqvist & Natan Elgabsi - 2021 - Scientia Moralitas 6 (2):78-103.
    The social intuitionist approach to moral judgments advanced by social psychologist Jonathan Haidt presupposes that it is possible to provide an explanation of the human moral sense without normative implications. By contrast, Iris Murdoch’s philosophical work on moral psychology suggests that every description of morality necessarily involves evaluative features that reveal the thinker’s own moral attitudes and implicit philosophical pictures. In the light of this, we contend that Haidt’s treatment of the story about Julie and Mark, two siblings who decide (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Making Sense of Shame in Response to Racism.Aness Kim Webster - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    Some people of colour feel shame in response to racist incidents. This phenomenon seems puzzling since, plausibly, they have nothing to feel shame about. This puzzle arises because we assume that targets of racism feel shame about their race. However, I propose that when an individual is racialised as non-White in a racist incident, shame is sometimes prompted, not by a negative self-assessment of her race, but by her inability to choose when her stigmatised race is made salient. I argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Attention in Iris Murdoch (1919–1999).Silvia Caprioglio Panizza - 2020 - In Ruth Waithe & Mary Ellen Hagengruber (eds.), Encyclopedia of Concise Concepts by Women Philosophers.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Reason and Intuition in Aristotle's Moral Psychology: Why He Was Not a Two-System Dualist.Kristján Kristjánsson - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations:1-16.
    This paper is about the interplay between intuition and reason in Aristotle’s moral psychology. After discussing briefly some other uses of ‘intuition’ in Aristotle’s texts, I look closely at A...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Communication Argument and the Pluralist Challenge.Shawn Tinghao Wang - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 51 (5):384-399.
    Various theorists have endorsed the “communication argument”: communicative capacities are necessary for morally responsible agency because blame aims at a distinctive kind of moral communication. I contend that existing versions of the argument, including those defended by Gary Watson and Coleen Macnamara, face a pluralist challenge: they do not seem to sit well with the plausible view that blame has multiple aims. I then examine three possible rejoinders to the challenge, suggesting that a context-specific, function-based approach constitutes the most promising (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Accessing Self-Control.Polaris Koi - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    Self-control is that which is enacted to align our behaviour with intentions, motives, or better judgment in the face of conflicting impulses of motives. In this paper, I ask, what explains interpersonal differences in self-control? After defending a functionalist conception of self-control, I argue that differences in self-control are analogous to differences in mobility: they are modulated by inherent traits and environmental supports and constraints in interaction. This joint effect of individual biology and environmental factors is best understood in terms (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. On Pleasure: Why Man is Innately Selfish.Jeremy Kalfus - manuscript
    In this paper, I will argue that man is a slave to his pleasure and nothing he does is not to serve it. I will use this conclusion to argue that man is incapable of acting in true altruism and thus is incapable of being, in any way, altruistic. The argument goes as follows: -/- (i) Every act man makes throughout his entire life is to experience a form pleasure; (ii) If man only acts to experience pleasure, man’s acts cannot (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Falling in Love.Pilar Lopez-Cantero - forthcoming - In Philosophy of Love in the Past, Present and Future.
    Most philosophers would agree that loving one’s romantic partner (i.e., being in love) is, in principle, a good thing. That is, romantic love can be valuable. It seems plausible that most would then think that the process leading to being in love—i.e. falling in love—can be valuable too. Surprisingly, that is not the case: among philosophers, falling in love has a bad reputation. Whereas philosophy of love has started to depart from traditional (and often unwarranted or false) tropes surrounding romantic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Moral Psychology, Vol. 3, The Neuroscience of Morality: Emotion, Brain Disorders, and Development.Walter Sinnott Armstrong (ed.) - 2007
  20. Sentimental Reasons.Edgar Phillips - 2021 - In Simon Cushing (ed.), New Philosophical Essays on Love and Loving. pp. 171–194.
    Much recent discussion of love concerns ‘the reasons for love’: whether we love for reasons and, if so, what sorts of things those reasons are. This chapter seeks to call into question some of the assumptions that have shaped this debate, in particular the assumption that love might be ‘responsive’ to reasons in something like the way that actions, beliefs, intentions and ordinary emotions are. I begin by drawing out some tensions in the existing literature on reasons for love, suggesting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Making Sense of Shame.James Laing - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    In this paper, I argue that we face a challenge in understanding the relationship between the ‘value-oriented’ and ‘other-oriented’ dimensions of shame. On the one hand, an emphasis on shame’s value-oriented dimension leads naturally to ‘The Self-Evaluation View’, an account which faces a challenge in explaining shame’s other-oriented dimension. This is liable to push us towards ‘The Social Evaluation View’. However The Social Evaluation View faces the opposite challenge of convincingly accommodating shame’s ‘value-oriented’ dimension. After rejecting one attempt to chart (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. The Nature of Temptation and its Role in the Development of Moral Virtue.Kevin Snider - 2021 - Dissertation, Middlesex University
    In the last 70 years there has been an explosion of philosophical and theological work on the nature of virtue and the process of virtue formation. Yet philosophers and theologians have paid little attention to the phenomenon of temptation and its role in developing virtue. Indeed, little analytic work has been done on the nature of temptation. This study aims to fill this gap in moral philosophy and theology by offering an analytic moral conception of temptation and explicating its connection (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Naturalism, Human Flourishing, and Asian Philosophy: Owen Flanagan and Beyond. [REVIEW]L. K. Gustin Law - 2021 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2021.
  24. APA Author Meets Critics for Shepherd, The Shape of Agency.Kim Frost, Sarah K. Paul & Joshua Shepherd - manuscript
    These comments, which take the form of criticism and response, were the basis of a zoom conversation at the Eastern APA, January 2021. Josh is putting them up on philpapers (with permission from all involved) in case they are helpful to people interested in the themes of this book.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Unity of Normative Thought.Jeremy David Fix - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Practical cognitivism is the view that practical reason is our will, not an intellectual capacity whose exercises can influence those of our will. If practical reason is our will, thoughts about how I am to act have an essential tie to action. They are intentions. Thoughts about how others are to act, though, lack such a tie to action. They are beliefs, not intentions. How, then, can these thoughts form a unified class? I reject two answers which deny the differences (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Laying One’s Cards on the Table: Experiencing Exile and Finding Our Feet in Moral Philosophical Encounters.Camilla Kronqvist & Natan Elgabsi - 2021 - Open Philosophy 4 (1):404-424.
    Engaging with the philosophical writings of Iris Murdoch, we submit that there are difficulties associated with providing a good description of morality that are intimately connected with difficulties in understanding other human beings. We suggest three senses in which moral philosophical reflection needs to account for our understanding of others: the failure to understand someone is not merely an intellectual failure, but also engages us morally; the moral question of understanding is not limited to the extent to which we understand (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Surprising Empirical Directions for Thomistic Moral Psychology: Social Information Processing and Aggression Research.Anne Jeffrey & Krista Mehari - forthcoming - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly.
    One of the major contemporary challenges to Thomistic moral psychology is that it is incompatible with the most up-to-date psychological science. Here Thomistic psychology is in good company, targeted along with most virtue-ethical views by philosophical situationism, which uses replicated psychological studies to suggest that our behaviors are best explained by situational pressures rather than by stable traits (like virtues and vices). In this essay we explain how this body of psychological research poses a much deeper threat to Thomistic moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The Justification Thesis: A Theory of Culpable Ignorance.Nathan Biebel - 2019 - Dissertation, Tulane University
    This dissertation examines the relationship between ignorance and responsibility. Ignorance is often treated as an excuse, but there are times when ignorance does not excuse. Ignorance that does not excuse is usually known as culpable ignorance. Since ignorance is largely an epistemological concept, the difference between culpable and exculpating ignorance suggests a connection between epistemology and theories of responsibility that has gone relatively unexplored. The following work explores this connection and argues that incorporating epistemological theories will help provide a robust (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Hoping and Intending.Cathy Mason - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    Hope powerfully influences our lives, deeply shaping our actions, as well as being essential for social and political change. Many accounts of hope, however, fail to do justice to its active role, ignoring the connection between hope and action that makes it a significant feature of our lives. In this essay, I propose a new account of hope in which hopes characteristically shape and figure in intentions. I argue that this account does justice to hope's distinctive manifestations in action, explains (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Problem of Authority and Divorce.Danielle Levitan - 2021 - Keele Law Review 2:63-91.
    In this paper, I argue against any state intrusion and interference that amounts to scrutiny of parents based on their decision to separate. The state, to my mind, ought not to be involved in childrearing decisions in cases of divorce unless there is a sufficient reason, and, as I will argue, divorce per se does not present a level of risk to children that justifies state intervention. The claims I am about to make apply not only to parental capability tests (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. ‘I Love Women’: An Explicit Explanation of Implicit Bias Test Results.Reis-Dennis Samuel & Vida Yao - 2021 - Synthese (5-6):13861-13882.
    Recent years have seen a surge of interest in implicit bias. Driving this concern is the thesis, apparently established by tests such as the IAT, that people who hold egalitarian explicit attitudes and beliefs, are often influenced by implicit mental processes that operate independently from, and are largely insensitive to, their explicit attitudes. We argue that implicit bias testing in social and empirical psychology does not, and without a fundamental shift in focus could not, establish this startling thesis. We suggest (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Brian Leiter, Moral Psychology with Nietzsche.Avery Snelson - 2021 - Ethics 132 (1):256-261.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Reflective Reasoning & Philosophy.Nick Byrd - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (11):e12786.
    Philosophy is a reflective activity. So perhaps it is unsurprising that many philosophers have claimed that reflection plays an important role in shaping and even improving our philosophical thinking. This hypothesis seems plausible given that training in philosophy has correlated with better performance on tests of reflection and reflective reasoning has correlated with demonstrably better judgments in a variety of domains. This article reviews the hypothesized roles of reflection in philosophical thinking as well as the empirical evidence for these roles. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Trolleys, Triage and Covid-19: The Role of Psychological Realism in Sacrificial Dilemmas.Markus Kneer & Ivar R. Hannikainen - 2021 - Cognition and Emotion 8.
    At the height of the Covid-19 pandemic, frontline medical professionals at intensive care units around the world faced gruesome decisions about how to ration life-saving medical resources. These events provided a unique lens through which to understand how the public reasons about real-world dilemmas involving trade-offs between human lives. In three studies (total N = 2298), we examined people’s moral attitudes toward triage of acute coronavirus patients, and found elevated support for utilitarian triage policies. These utilitarian tendencies did not stem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Review of Justin Tosi and Brandon Warmke's Grandstanding: The Use and Abuse of Moral Talk.[REVIEW]Evan Westra - forthcoming - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. No Problem of Consistent Incompatible Desires: a Reply to Baumann.Daniel Coren - 2020 - Acta Analytica 36 (3):465-474.
    In a brief and deeply interesting 2017 Acta Analytica paper, Peter Baumann argues that there are cases of necessarily incompatible but mutually consistent desires, that this is a common problem, and that there is no solution in sight. I’ll argue that Baumann fails to note certain non-trivial assumptions that must be made for the possibility of consistent incompatible desires; if consistent incompatible desires do exist then they’re sometimes beneficial; and if they are sometimes involved with problematic outcomes then the mere (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Can Xun Zi’s Proposition on “Establishing Ritual Practices in Accordwith Qing ” Be Validated?Chenyang Li - 2014 - 中国社会科学 35 (1):146-162.
    Wang Guowei expressed doubts about Xun Zi’s proposition on “establishing ritual practices in accord with qing,” arguing that it was in direct confict with the philosopher’s famous thesis that “human natural tendency is evil.” The word qing (情) has several connotations in the Xunzi: it may refer to factual truth (实情), sincerity (诚实) or emotions (情感). Readers of the Xunzi tend to view the emotional connotation of qing in a negative light, but in actuality qing as human emotions can also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Good and The Gross: Essays in Metaethics and Moral Psychology.Alexandra A. Plakias - 2011 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    The three papers in this dissertation attempt to explore and defend a kind of middle ground with respect to the question of moral objectivity. In the first paper I use the case of disgust to show how not to go about raising skepticism about moral judgment; in doing so, I argue that disgust can be vindicated with an account on which it tracks social contagion as well as physical contamination. Therefore, the question of whether disgust is an appropriate reaction to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Ordinary Self-Consciousness as Philosophical Problem.James Laing - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Excuse Without Exculpation: The Case of Moral Ignorance.Paulina Sliwa - 2020 - In Russ Shafer Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. pp. 72-95.
    Can moral ignorance excuse? This chapter argues that philosophical debate of this question has been based on a mistaken assumption: namely that excuses are all-or-nothing affairs; to have an excuse is to be blameless. The chapter argues that we should reject this assumption. Excuses are not binary but gradable: they can be weaker or stronger, mitigating blame to greater or lesser extent. This chapter explores the notions of strength of excuses, blame miti- gation and the relationship between excuses and moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. The History and Philosophy of Fanaticism.Paul Katsafanas (ed.) - forthcoming - London: Routledge.
    24 original essays on the philosophy of fanaticism. These essays explore the epistemology, moral psychology, and ethics of fanaticism. The attached file contains a brief introduction and table of contents. -/- .
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Desire and Goodness.Allan Hazlett - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Hume argued that passions, unlike judgments of the understanding, cannot be reasonable or unreasonable. Crucial for his argument was the premise that passions cannot be correct or incorrect. As he put it: “[a] passion is an original existence … and contains not any representative quality” and “passions are not susceptible of any … agreement or disagreement either to the real relations of ideas, or to real existence and matter of fact … being original facts and realities, compleat in themselves.” In (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Narrative, Second-Person Experience, and Self-Perception: A Reason It is Good to Conceive of One's Life Narratively.Grace Hibshman - forthcoming - The Philosophical Quarterly.
    It is widely held that it is good to conceive of one's life narratively, but why this is the case has not been well established. I argue that conceiving of one's life narratively can contribute to one's flourishing by mediating to oneself a second-person experience of oneself, furnishing one with valuable second-personal productive distance from oneself and as a result self-understanding. Drawing on Eleonore Stump's theory that narratives re-present to their audiences the second-person experiences they depict, I argue that conceiving (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Desires, Their Objects, and the Things Leading to Pursuit.Duane Long - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    I offer a novel analysis of the relations between Aristotle’s three species of desire - appetite, temper, and wish - and the three things he says in EN 2.3 lead to pursuit - the pleasant, the beneficial, and the noble. It has long been tempting to think that these trios line up with one another in some way, ideally relating their members in one-to-one fashion. One account, by John Cooper, has gathered prominent adherents, but other authors, notably Giles Pearson, have (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. The Aesthetics of Ethics: Exemplarism, Beauty, and the Psychology of Morality.Panos Paris - forthcoming - Journal of Value Inquiry:1-25.
    Linda Zagzebski recently put forward a new theory, moral exemplarism, that is meant to provide an alternative to theories like consequentialism and deontology, and which proposes to define key moral terms by direct reference to exemplars. The theory’s basic structure is straightforward. A virtuous person is defined as a person like that, where that points to individuals like Leopold Socha, Confucius, Jesus Christ, and so on. A key component of this theory is the function played by the emotions, specifically the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Plato’s Moral Psychology (PMP) Distinguishes Two Theses That Might Be Taken as Foundational to Plato’s Psychologizing.Rachana Kamtekar - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):217-220.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Comments on Rachana Kamtekar, Plato’s Moral Psychology.Gabriel R. Lear - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):221-227.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Psychological Eudaimonism and the Natural Desire for the Good: Comments on Rachana Kamtekar's Plato's Moral Psychology.Iakovos Vasiliou - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):234-239.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Purity of Agent-Regret.Jake Wojtowicz - forthcoming - Philosophy.
    I argue for a novel understanding of the nature of agent-regret. On the standard picture, agent-regret involves regretting the result of one’s action and thus regretting one’s action. I argue that the standard picture is a flawed analysis of agent-regret. I offer several cases of agent-regret where the agent feels agent-regret but does not regret the result itself. I appeal to other cases where an agent’s attitude towards something depends upon whether or not they are involved in that thing. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. What’s Inside is All That Counts? The Contours of Everyday Thinking About Self-Control.Juan Pablo Bermúdez, Samuel Murray, Louis Chartrand & Sergio Barbosa - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-23.
    Does self-control require willpower? The question cuts to the heart of a debate about whether self-control is identical with some psychological process internal to the agents or not. Noticeably absent from these debates is systematic evidence about the folk-psychological category of self-control. Here, we present the results of two behavioral studies (N = 296) that indicate the structure of everyday thinking about self-control. In Study 1, participants rated the degree to which different strategies to respond to motivational conflict exemplify self-control. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 15375