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  1. The Genetic Technologies Questionnaire: Lay Judgments About Genetic Technologies Align with Ethical Theory, Are Coherent, and Predict Behaviour.Svenja Küchenhoff, Johannes Doerflinger & Nora Heinzelmann - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (54).
    -/- Policy regulations of ethically controversial genetic technologies should, on the one hand, be based on ethical principles. On the other hand, they should be socially acceptable to ensure implementation. In addition, they should align with ethical theory. Yet to date we lack a reliable and valid scale to measure the relevant ethical judgements in laypeople. We target this lacuna. -/- We developed a scale based on ethical principles to elicit lay judgments: the Genetic Technologies Questionnaire (GTQ). In two pilot (...)
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  2. Beyond ‘Born Not Made’: Challenging Character, Emotions and Professionalism in Undergraduate Medical Education.Marie Allitt & Sally Frampton - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012365.
    In this article we explore the historical antecedents and ongoing perpetuation of the idea that medical professionals must adhere to a specific ‘character’. In the late nineteenth century, an ideal of the medical student as ‘born not made’ was substantiated through medical school opening addresses and other medical literature. An understanding prevailed that students would have a natural inclination that would suit them to medical work, which was predicated on class structures. As we move into the twentieth-century context, we see (...)
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  3. (De)Troubling Transparency: Artificial Intelligence (AI) for Clinical Applications.Peter David Winter & Annamaria Carusi - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012318.
    Artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques occupy a prominent role in medical research in terms of the innovation and development of new technologies. However, while many perceive AI as a technology of promise and hope—one that is allowing for more early and accurate diagnosis—the acceptance of AI and ML technologies in hospitals remains low. A major reason for this is the lack of transparency associated with these technologies, in particular epistemic transparency, which results in AI disturbing or troubling established knowledge (...)
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  4. Fatherlessness, Sperm Donors and ‘so What?’ Parentage: Arguing Against the Immorality of Donor Conception Through ‘World Literature’.Grace Halden - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012328.
    Is biology and knowing biological ancestral information essential to the construction of identity? Bioethicist James David Velleman believes this is the case and argues that donor gamete conception is immoral because a portion of genetic heritage will be unknown. Velleman is critical of sperm donation and the absence of a biological father in donor-assisted families. His bioethical work, specifically the 2005 article ‘Family History’, is oft-cited in articles debating the ethics surrounding gamete donations and diverse family formations. However, I wonder (...)
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  5. Biopower Under a State of Exception: Stories of Dying and Grieving Alone During COVID-19 Emergency Measures.J. Cristian Rangel, Dave Holmes, Amélie Perron & Granville E. Miller - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012255.
    During the COVID-19 pandemic, restrictions for visitors and caregivers in healthcare settings and long-term care facilities were enacted in the larger context of public health policies that included physical distancing and shelter-in-place orders. Older persons residing in LTC facilities constituted over half of the mortality statistics across Canada during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Using the poststructuralist work of Agamben, Foucault and Mbembe we conducted a thematic analysis on news reports. The extracts of media stories presented in our (...)
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  6. Xenotransplantation and Borders: Two Indian Narratives.Meenakshi Srihari - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2022-012412.
    This paper examines two Indian texts, Anand Gandhi’s film The Ship of Theseus and Manjula Padmanabhan’s play Harvest, which deal with complex biopolitical and geopolitical questions around organ transplantation, for their treatment of corporeal, geopolitical and ethical borders.By dramatising the lives of carriers who are both receivers and donors, the texts enact boundaries, visible and invisible, from both sides. I focus on the carrier of the diseased organ—already a stranger, as Jean-Luc Nancy describes his own failing heart in L’Intrus —and (...)
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  7. A ‘Prodigious Latitude’ of Words: Vocabularies of Illness in 18th-Century Medical Treatises and Women’s Writing.Heather Meek - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2020-012133.
    In its examination of a selection of 18th-century medical treatises and women’s writing, this essay considers a range of context-specific and historically specific medical vocabularies and tries to illuminate the various linguistic registers of physicians’ and women’s understandings and experiences of physio-emotional illness. In a preprofessionalised world in which medical and literary cultures overlapped significantly and medical knowledge was not yet restricted to a group of formally trained male elites, vocabularies of illness abounded, oftentimes moving freely between the permeable disciplinary (...)
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  8. Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioral Economics for Medical Ethics.Heloise Robinson - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (2):188-191.
    There has been a significant growth in the literature on nudging and behavioural economics, since Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein published their well-known book Nudge: Improving Decisions about H...
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  9. The Unnaturalistic Fallacy: COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Should Not Discriminate Against Natural Immunity.Jonathan Pugh, Julian Savulescu, Rebecca C. H. Brown & Dominic Wilkinson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):371-377.
    COVID-19 vaccine requirements have generated significant debate. Here, we argue that, on the evidence available, such policies should have recognised proof of natural immunity as a sufficient basis for exemption to vaccination requirements. We begin by distinguishing our argument from two implausible claims about natural immunity: natural immunity is superior to ‘artificial’ vaccine-induced immunity simply because it is ‘natural’ and it is better to acquire immunity through natural infection than via vaccination. We then briefly survey the evidence base for the (...)
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  10. Patient Consent Preferences on Sharing Personal Health Information During the COVID-19 Pandemic: “The More Informed We Are, the More Likely We Are to Help”.Sarah Tosoni, Indu Voruganti, Katherine Lajkosz, Shahbano Mustafa, Anne Phillips, S. Joseph Kim, Rebecca K. S. Wong, Donald Willison, Carl Virtanen, Ann Heesters & Fei-Fei Liu - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Background Rapid ethical access to personal health information to support research is extremely important during pandemics, yet little is known regarding patient preferences for consent during such crises. This follow-up study sought to ascertain whether there were differences in consent preferences between pre-pandemic times compared to during Wave 1 of the COVID-19 global pandemic, and to better understand the reasons behind these preferences. Methods A total of 183 patients in the pandemic cohort completed the survey via email, and responses were (...)
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  11. COVID-19 Narratives and Layered Temporality.Jessica Howell - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012258.
    The essay outlines the ways in which narrative approaches to COVID-19 can draw on imaginative literature and critical oral history to resist the ‘closure’ often offered by cultural representations of epidemics. To support this goal, it analyses science and speculative fiction by Alejandro Morales and Tananarive Due in terms of how these works create alternative temporalities, which undermine colonial and racist medical discourse. The essay then examines a new archive of emerging autobiographical illness narratives, namely online Facebook posts and oral (...)
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  12. Are Conscientious Objectors Morally Obligated to Refer?Samuel Reis-Dennis & Abram Brummett - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    In this paper, we argue that providers who conscientiously refuse to provide legal and professionally accepted medical care are not always morally required to refer their patients to willing providers. Indeed, we will argue that refusing to refer is morally admirable in certain instances. In making the case, we show that belief in a sweeping moral duty to refer depends on an implicit assumption that the procedures sanctioned by legal and professional norms are ethically permissible. Focusing on examples of female (...)
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  13. A Chronological Discourse Analysis of Ancillary Care Provision in Guidance Documents for Research Conduct in the Global South.Blessings M. Kapumba, Nicola Desmond & Janet Seeley - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Introduction Numerous guidelines and policies for ethical research practice have evolved over time, how this translates to global health practice in resource-constrained settings is unclear. The purpose of this paper is to describe how the concept of ancillary care has evolved over time and how it is included in the ethics guidelines and policy documents that guide the conduct of research in the global south with both an international focus and providing a specific example of Malawi, where the first author (...)
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  14. Military Medical Ethics in Contemporary Armed Conflict: Mobilizing Medicine in the Pursuit of Just warMichael L.GrossOxford University Press:Oxford,2021. 304 Pp. ISBN 978‐0190694944. £29.99 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Saba Bazargan-Forward - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  15. Mapping the Ethical Issues of Digital Twins for Personalised Healthcare Service.Pei-Hua Huang, Ki-hun Kim & Maartje Schermer - 2022 - Journal of Medical Internet Research 24 (1):e33081.
    Background: The concept of digital twins has great potential for transforming the existing health care system by making it more personalized. As a convergence of health care, artificial intelligence, and information and communication technologies, personalized health care services that are developed under the concept of digital twins raise a myriad of ethical issues. Although some of the ethical issues are known to researchers working on digital health and personalized medicine, currently, there is no comprehensive review that maps the major ethical (...)
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  16. COVID-19 Vaccination and the Right to Take Risks.Pei-Hua Huang - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The rare but severe cerebral venous thrombosis occurring in some AstraZeneca vaccine recipients has prompted some governments to suspend part of their COVID-19 vaccination programmes. Such suspensions have faced various challenges from both scientific and ethical angles. Most of the criticisms against such suspensions follow a consequentialist approach, arguing that the suspension will lead to more harm than benefits. In this paper, I propose a rights-based argument against the suspension of the vaccine rollouts amid this highly time-sensitive combat of COVID-19. (...)
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  17. Military Medical Ethics in Contemporary Armed Conflict: Mobilizing Medicine in the Pursuit of Just War Michael L. Gross Oxford University Press: Oxford, 2021. 304 Pp. ISBN 978‐0190694944. £29.99 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Saba Bazargan-Forward - forthcoming - Wiley: Bioethics.
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  18. The COVID-19 Vaccine Patent: A Right Without Rationale.Nabeel Mahdi Althabhawi & Ali Adil Kashef Al-Ghetaa - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2022-012386.
    Since the approval of COVID-19 vaccines, international efforts have intensified on vaccination schemes perceived as the only light at the end of the tunnel. Governments are working tirelessly to scale up the number of vaccinated people, just as vaccine manufacturers are stretching their facilities to meet the increasing demand for doses. The international community is trying to help the poorest countries in the world by improving vaccine supplies and removing obstacles. In this regard, India and South Africa have applied to (...)
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  19. Relating Person‐Centredness to Quality‐of‐Life Assessments and Patient‐Reported Outcomes in Healthcare: A Critical Theoretical Discussion.Viktor Andersson, Richard Sawatzky & Joakim Öhlén - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  20. Exploring the Intersection of Critical Disability Studies, Humanities and Global Health Through a Case Study of Scarf Injuries in Bangladesh.Anna Tupetz, Marion Quirici, Mohsina Sultana, Kazi Imdadul Hoque, Kearsley Alison Stewart & Michel Landry - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012244.
    This article puts critical disability studies and global health into conversation around the phenomenon of scarf injury in Bangladesh. Scarf injury occurs when a woman wearing a long, traditional scarf called an orna rides in a recently introduced autorickshaw with a design flaw that allows the orna to become entangled in the vehicle’s driveshaft. Caught in the engine, the orna pulls the woman’s neck into hyperextension, causing a debilitating high cervical spinal cord injury and quadriplegia. The circumstances of the scarf (...)
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  21. Finding More Constructive Ways Forward in the Debate Over Vaccines with Increased Disability Cultural Competence.Carolin Ahlvik-Harju - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012342.
    The aim of this article is to study the discursive construction of disability that takes place in the vaccine-autism controversy from the 1990s to 2000s, and an attempt to develop a more holistic framework to understand vaccine decisions and their motivations. It is argued that the debate over vaccines produces knowledge and meanings about disability, and that the vaccine-autism controversy is kept alive largely because of how it reproduces stigmatising accounts of disability and autism. The suggestion is that if the (...)
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  22. Sea of Bodies: A Medical Discourse of the Refugee Crisis in Tears of Salt: A Doctor’s Story.Lava Asaad & Matthew Spencer - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012242.
    In the memoir Tears of Salt: A Doctor’s Story, Pietro Bartolo relates visceral descriptions of illness, injury and death endured by refugees on their journey of escape to the shores of Lampedusa in the Mediterranean. The medical gaze of the doctor/author further complicates the political and philosophical discourse of mass migration, foregrounding and calling into question the myriad ways in which the migrating human body is subjugated to forms of structural violence that render it ungrievable and inhuman. The migrating body, (...)
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  23. Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioural Economics for Medical Ethics. Jennifer S.Blumenthal‐BarbyMIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 2021. 251 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐262‐54248‐7. US $45.00 (Soft Cover). [REVIEW]Kathryn MacKay - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):474-475.
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  24. Public Trust and Medical Ethics.Elizabeth Lanphier - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (2):58-59.
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 2, Page 58-59, March‐April 2022.
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  25. Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioural Economics for Medical Ethics. Jennifer S. Blumenthal‐Barby MIT Press: Cambridge, MA, 2021. 251 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐262‐54248‐7. US $45.00 (Soft Cover). [REVIEW]Kathryn MacKay - 2022 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (4).
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 474-475, May 2022.
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  26. Review of Jennifer S. Blumenthal-Barby, Good Ethics and Bad Choices: The Relevance of Behavioral Economics for Medical Ethics. [REVIEW]Sven Nyholm - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (5):4-5.
    When Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby was a bioethics intern at the Cleveland Clinic while she was still a graduate student, she was puzzled by the decision making of some patients at the clinic. For exam...
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  27. Health Law and Medical Ethics in Singapore.Gary Chan Kok Yew - 2020 - Routledge.
    This book encompasses two inter-related disciplines of health law and medical ethics applicable to Singapore. Apart from Singapore legal materials, it draws upon relevant case precedents and statutory developments from other common law countries and incorporates recommendations and reports by health-related bodies, agencies and committees. The book is written in an accessible manner suitable for tertiary students. It should also serve as a useful resource for medico-legal practitioners, academics and healthcare professionals who wish to keep abreast of the evolving legal (...)
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  28. The Trouble with Personhood and Person‐Centred Care.Matthew Tieu, Alexandra Mudd, Tiffany Conroy, Alejandra Pinero de Plaza & Alison Kitson - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy.
    The phrase ‘person‐centred care’ (PCC) reminds us that the fundamental philosophical goal of caring for people is to uphold or promote their personhood. However, such an idea has translated into promoting individualist notions of autonomy, empowerment and personal responsibility in the context of consumerism and neoliberalism, which is problematic both conceptually and practically. From a conceptual standpoint, it ignores the fact that humans are social, historical and biographical beings, and instead assumes an essentialist or idealized concept of personhood in which (...)
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  29. Clinical Reasoning as Midwifery: A Socratic Model for Shared Decision Making in Person‐Centred Care.Julie D. Gunby & Jennifer Ryan Lockhart - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  30. Writing the Worlds of Genomic Medicine: Experiences of Using Participatory-Writing to Understand Life with Rare Conditions.Richard Gorman & Bobbie Farsides - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012346.
    The diagnostic and treatment possibilities made possible by the development and subsequent mainstreaming of clinical genomics services have the potential to profoundly change the experiences of families affected by rare genetic conditions. Understanding the potentials of genomic medicine requires that we consider the perspectives of those who engage with such services; there are substantial social implications involved. There are increasing calls to think more creatively, and draw on more participatory approaches, in evoking rich accounts of lived experience. In this article, (...)
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  31. Situational Judgment Using Ethical Reasoning in Saudi Undergraduate Pharmacy Students.Fahad Saleh Alkhuzaee, Majid Ali, Khang Wen Goh, Yaser Mohammed Al-Worafi & Long Chiau Ming - 2022 - BMC Medical Ethics 23 (1).
    Introduction There is a paramount need for moral development for pharmacists and pharmacy students to practice the patient-centered profession. We aimed to explore the current situational judgment utilizing ethical reasoning among undergraduate pharmacy students. Methods A set of ten ethical dilemmas, representing potential real-life situations that the students come across in the university and may face in the future as a pharmacist were developed by a team of students, academic staff, and stakeholders. These ethical dilemmas were validated, checked for accuracy, (...)
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  32. Teaching Medical Ethics Through Medical Law.Christopher Cowley - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):139-152.
    Medical ethics is normally taught in a combination of three ways: through discussions of normative theories and principles; through for-and-against debating of topics; or through case studies. I want to argue that a fourth approach might be better, and should be used more: teaching medical ethics through medical law. Medical law is already deeply imbued with ethical concepts, principles and reasons, and allows the discussion of ethics through the “back door,” as it were. The two greatest advantages of the law (...)
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  33. Commitment Devices: Beyond the Medical Ethics of Nudges.Nathan Hodson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107967.
    Commitment devices can help people overcome self-control problems to act on their plans and preferences. In these arrangements, people willingly make one of their options worse in order to change their own future behaviour, often by setting aside a sum of money that they will forfeit it if they fail to complete the planned action. Such applications of behavioural science have been used to help people stick to healthier lifestyle choices, overcome addictions and adhere to medication; they are acceptable to (...)
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  34. Varsity Medical Ethics Debate 2019: Is Authoritarian Government the Route to Good Health Outcomes?Azmaeen Zarif, Rhea Mittal, Ben Popham, Imogen C. Vorley, Jessy Jindal & Emily C. Morris - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107861.
    Authoritarian governments are characterised by political systems with concentrated and centralised power. Healthcare is a critical component of any state. Given the powers of an authoritarian regime, we consider the opportunities they possess to derive good health outcomes. The 2019 Varsity Medical Ethics Debate convened on the motion: ‘This house believes authoritarian government is the route to good health outcomes’ with Oxford as the Proposition and Cambridge as the Opposition. This article summarises and extends key arguments made during the 11th (...)
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  35. First Among Equals? Adaptive Preferences and the Limits of Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Susan Pennings & Xavier Symons - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107942.
    Respect for patient autonomy is a central principle of medical ethics. However, there are important unresolved questions about the characteristics of an autonomous decision, and whether some autonomous preferences should be subject to more scrutiny than others.In this paper, we consider whether inappropriately adaptive preferences—preferences that are based on and that may perpetuate social injustice—should be categorised as autonomous in a way that gives them normative authority. Some philosophers have argued that inappropriately adaptive preferences do not have normative authority, because (...)
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  36. Historiographies of Surgical Innovation: Endoscopic Endonasal Pituitary Surgery.Katherine Conroy - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012264.
    The historiography of medicine has shifted from narratives of inevitable progress, authored mainly by the medical profession, to a more complex, analytical approach in which historians place medicine in its social context. However, the history of surgery has lagged behind somewhat; Christopher Lawrence suggests this is because the recent focus on the construction of medical knowledge does not incorporate the practical aspects of surgery, which are difficult to extract from their previous linear narrative. Thomas Schlich likewise recognises that surgery is (...)
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  37. Adiaphorisation and the Digital Nursing Gaze: Liquid Surveillance in Long‐Term Care.Giovanni Rubeis - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  38. Reflections of the Collaborative Care Planning as a Person‐Centred Practice.Ingela Jobe - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  39. Understanding and Formation—A Process of Becoming a Nurse.Ann-Helén Sandvik & Yvonne Hilli - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  40. What Makes Us Human? Exploring the Significance of Ricoeur's Ethical Configuration of Personhood Between Naturalism and Phenomenology in Health Care.Bengt Kristensson Uggla - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
  41. Contemplating the Spirituality of Scholarship.David Coghlan - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  42. Some Thoughts About the Future of Nursing and/in Philosophy.Miriam Bender & Stefanos Mantzoukas - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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  43. ‘Sono Solo Parole’: Facing Challenges Entailed in Developing and Applying Terminologies to Document Nursing Care.Cecilia Malabusini - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  44. Practising the Ethics of Person‐Centred Care Balancing Ethical Conviction and Moral Obligations.Inger Ekman - forthcoming - Nursing Philosophy.
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  45. Exploring the Uses of Virtues in Woman‐Centred Care: A Quest, Synthesis and Reflection.Yvonne J. Kuipers - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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  46. Persuasive Discourses in Editorials Published by the Top‐Five Nursing Journals: Findings From a 5‐Year Analysis.Giovanna Iob, Chiara Visintini & Alvisa Palese - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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  47. Hospitals as Total Institutions.Danisha Jenkins, Candace Burton & Dave Holmes - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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  48. Making Things Work: Using Bourdieu's Theory of Practice to Uncover an Ontology of Everyday Nursing in Practice.Sarah Lake, Sandra West & Trudy Rudge - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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  49. Gilles Deleuze's Societies of Control: Implications for Mental Health Nursing and Coercive Community Care.Etienne Paradis-Gagné & Dave Holmes - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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  50. Existential Phenomenology as a Unifying Philosophy of Science for a Mixed Method Study.Birgith Pedersen, Mette Grønkjær & Charlotte Delmar - 2022 - Nursing Philosophy 23 (2).
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1 — 50 / 19699