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Locke: Abstract Ideas
  1. Locke and Berkeley on Abstract Ideas: From the Point of View of the Theory of Reference.Yasuhiko Tomida - 2022 - Philosophia 50 (4):2161-2182.
    In the Essay Locke argues abstract ideas within the framework of the descriptivist theory of reference. For him, abstract ideas are, in many cases, conceptual ideas that play the role of “descriptions” or “descriptive contents,” determining general terms’ referents. In contrast, in the introduction of the Principles, Berkeley denies Lockean abstract ideas adamantly from an imagistic point of view, and he offers his own theory of reference seemingly consisting of referring expressions and their referents alone. However, interestingly, he mentions a (...)
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  2. Sobre el “triángulo general” de Locke, de Evert Willem Berth.Javier Fuentes - 2021 - Con-Textos Kantianos 14:107-134.
    Sobre el “triángulo general” de Locke, de Evert Willem Berth.
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  3. Locke, Arnauld, and Abstract Ideas.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (1):75-94.
    A great deal of the criticism directed at Locke's theory of abstract ideas assumes that a Lockean abstract idea is a special kind of idea which by its very nature either represents many diverse particulars or represents separately things that cannot exist in separation. This interpretation of Locke has been challenged by scholars such as Kenneth Winkler and Michael Ayers who regard it as uncharitable in light of the obvious problems faced by this theory of abstraction. Winkler and Ayers argue (...)
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  4. Locke e la discussione sugli universali.Dino Buzzetti - 1982 - In Dino Buzzetti & Maurizio Ferriani (eds.), La grammatica del pensiero. Logica, linguaggio e conoscenza nell' età dell' Illuminismo. il Mulino. pp. 213-257.
  5. Locke on the Making of Complex Ideas.M. Losonsky - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  6. Abstraction and Abstractionism.R. Gallie - 1994 - Locke Studies 25:63.
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  7. Ideas, General Reference and Abstraction in Locke's Essay.Christopher Joseph Panza - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
    In Book III of the Essay, Locke says that general terms are capable of referring to more than one particular thing. How does general reference work? The basic Lockean view of language suggests that words refer by evoking in the mind an idea---or mental intermediary---that stands in just the right relationship to the object the word is said to refer to. So a word refers by standing for an idea which itself is a sign for the right object in the (...)
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  8. Abstraction and the 'Esse' is 'Percipi' Thesis.David William Drebushenko - 1987 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
    The dissertation is divided into two parts. In Part One, Locke's theory of abstract general ideas is introduced and it is explained how it is to be used in giving an account of how certain common nouns refer. In the second chapter, Berkeley's attack on the theory of abstract ideas is described. In the third chapter, a defense of the doctrine proposed by J. L. Mackie is considered. It is argued that this fails as it stands, but the chapter goes (...)
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  9. 'Separation'of ideas reconsidered: A response to Jonathan Walmsley.Yasuhiko Tomida - 2005 - Locke Studies 5:39-56.
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  10. Locke, ideas and abstraction: A reply to Yasuhiko Tomida.Jonathan Walmsley - 2007 - Locke Studies 7:173-205.
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  11. Sémiotique et abstraction : de Locke à Condillac.François Duchesneau - 1976 - Philosophiques 3 (2):147-166.
  12. O triângulo geral de Locke ea consideração parcial de Berkeley.Bento Prado Neto - 2005 - Doispontos 1 (2).
  13. I think something that you do not think, and that is red. John Locke and George Berkeley over abstract ideas and Kant's logical abstractionism.Alexander Aichele - 2012 - Kant Studien 103 (1):25-46.
    The paper discusses Berkeley's classical critique of Locke's theory of generating concepts by abstraction, rebuts it, and shows that endorses Lockean abstractionism concerning the formation of empirical concepts.
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  14. Abstraction and the Origin of General Ideas.Stephen Laurence & Eric Margolis - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12:1-22.
    Philosophers have often claimed that general ideas or representations have their origin in abstraction, but it remains unclear exactly what abstraction as a psychological process consists in. We argue that the Lockean aspiration of using abstraction to explain the origins of all general representations cannot work and that at least some general representations have to be innate. We then offer an explicit framework for understanding abstraction, one that treats abstraction as a computational process that operates over an innate quality space (...)
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  15. Reid’s Answer to Abstract Ideas.Susan V. Castagnetto - 1992 - Journal of Philosophical Research 17:39-60.
    The doctrine of abstract ideas contains Locke’s views on the nature of generality and how we think in general terms-the nature of universals, of general concepts, and how we classify. While Reid rejects abstract ideas, he accepts Locke’s insight that we have an ability to abstract. In this paper, I show how Reid preserves Locke’s insight, while providing a more versatile and forward-looking account of universals and concepts than Locke was able to give.Reid replaces abstract ideas with what he calls (...)
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  16. Words and Images: An Essay on the Origin of Ideas.Christopher Gauker - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    At least since Locke, philosophers and psychologists have usually held that concepts arise out of sensory perceptions, thoughts are built from concepts, and language enables speakers to convey their thoughts to hearers. Christopher Gauker holds that this tradition is mistaken about both concepts and language. The mind cannot abstract the building blocks of thoughts from perceptual representations. More generally, we have no account of the origin of concepts that grants them the requisite independence from language. Gauker's alternative is to show (...)
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  17. Philosophie des ressemblances contre philosophie des universaux chez Locke.Geneviève Brykman - 1995 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (4):439 - 454.
    Tandis que l'histoire de la philosophie est traversée par la dichotomie entre le réalisme des universaux et le nominalisme, on tend à négliger la position intermédiaire — le conceptualisme — dont on a fait de Locke le plus illustre représentant, mais qu'on a tenu pour disqualifié par les célèbres critiques de Berkeley ou Leibniz. On peut cependant montrer que le conceptualisme est doublé d'une ontologie sous-jacente qui pourrait fournir aux philosophes contemporains une alternative originale à la philosophie des universaux. Whereas (...)
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  18. Are Locke’s Abstract Ideas Fictions?Sally Ferguson - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):129 - 140.
    JOHN YOLTON HAS CONTRIBUTED A Locke Dictionary as a recent addition to his many works on the life and philosophy of John Locke. In the entries on “abstraction” and on “abstract or general ideas ” in that text, Yolton makes some rather bold assertions. He argues that, despite Berkeley’s attack on Locke’s theory of abstract or general ideas, Locke’s theory is in fact quite similar to Berkeley’s own account. In the course of this discussion, Yolton concludes that, for Locke, abstract (...)
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  19. Locke's Triangles.N. G. E. Harris - 1988 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):31 - 41.
    One of the most frequently discussed passages from Locke's An Essay Concerning the Human Understanding is that which occurs in IV.vii.9, where he writes:… the Ideas first in the Mind, ‘tis evident, are those of particular Things, from whence, by slow degrees, the Understanding proceeds to some few general ones; which being taken from the ordinary and familiar Objects of Sense, are settled in the Mind, with general Names to them. Thus particular Ideas are first received and distinguished, and so (...)
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  20. 'Abstraction and representation in Locke, Berkeley and Hume'.Alexander Stewart - unknown
  21. Locke on abstraction: A response to M. R. Ayers.Jonathan Walmsley - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (1):123 – 134.
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  22. Locke's abstract ideas.Willis Doney - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):406-409.
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  23. Locke's abstract ideas.John Linnell - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):400-405.
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  24. General ideas and the knowability of essence: Interpretations of Locke's theory of knowledge.Maurilio Lovatti - 2004 - Dissertation, Oxford, Tercentenary John Locke Conference (April 2-4, 2004)
    Widespread amongst scholars is the legend according to which Locke shows a strong aversion to abstract ideas, similar to that of Berkley in the Treatise. This legend is endorsed by influential commentators on Locke. He does not even propose the reduction of ideas to mental pictures (a reduction which in Berkeley and Hume will form the base of the negation of the existence of abstract ideas in the mind). Locke is not in the least afraid of abstract ideas; his constant (...)
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  25. The "experimentum crucis" in Locke's doctrine of abstraction.William L. Reese - 1960 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (4):490-500.
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  26. Berkeley's theory of abstract ideas.C. C. W. Taylor - 1978 - Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):97-115.
    While claiming to refute locke's theory of abstract ideas, Berkeley himself accepts a form of abstractionism. Locke's account of abstraction is indeterminate between two doctrines: 1) abstract ideas are representations of paradigm instances of kinds, 2) abstract ideas are schematic representations of the defining features of kinds. Berkeley's arguments are directed exclusively against 2, And refute only a specific version of it, Which there is no reason to ascribe to locke; berkeley himself accepts abstract ideas of the former type. Locke's (...)
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Locke: Representation
  1. Locke on sense perception.Walter Ott - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. London: Routledge. pp. 116-126.
    Much recent philosophy of perception is preoccupied with finding a place for phenomenal character in a physical world. By contrast, Locke’s philosophy of sensory perception is an episode in his ‘Historical, plain method’ and seeks to map out the processes by which we experience ordinary objects. On Locke’s account, our ideas of primary and secondary qualities enter the mind ‘simple and unmixed’; having an idea of a colour, for example, is not necessary for the visual experience of a shape. An (...)
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  2. Locke on the role of judgment in perception.Walter Ott - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):670-684.
    How much is given in perceptual experience, and how much must be constructed? John Locke's answer to this question contains two prima facie incompatible strands. On the one hand, he claims that ideas of primary qualities come to us passively, through multiple senses: the idea of a sphere can be received either by sight or touch. On the other hand, Locke seemingly thinks that a faculty he calls “judgment” is needed to create visual ideas of three‐dimensional shapes. How can these (...)
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  3. La crítica de George Berkeley al representacionalismo de John Locke.Alberto Oya - 2018 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 35 (1):109-126.
    En su Tratado sobre los principios del conocimiento humano, George Berkeley ofrece una serie de argumentos cuyo objetivo es criticar la tesis materialista. Mi propósito en este artículo es reconstruir y analizar en detalle estos argumentos. Dado que la crítica de Berkeley al materialismo es, fundamentalmente, una crítica al materialismo representacionalista de John Locke, empezaré este artículo explicando cuáles son las ideas básicas de la propuesta de Locke.
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  4. Locke's Image of the World.Michael Jacovides - 2017 - [Oxford, United Kingdom]: Oxford University Press.
    Michael Jacovides provides an engaging account of how the scientific revolution influenced one of the foremost figures of early modern philosophy, John Locke. By placing Locke's thought in its scientific, religious, and anti-scholastic contexts, Jacovides explains not only what Locke believes but also why he believes it.
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  5. A Defense of Locke and The Representative Theory of Perception.Martha Brandt Bolton - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (sup1):101-120.
    This paper is a defense of the “representative theory of perception” in general, and Locke's views about perception in particular. It is intended only as a limited defense, but one against those objections which recently have been taken thoroughly to discredit both the general theory and Locke's particular position. The chief of these objections is that the representative theory leads inevitably to skepticism about the existence of objective material things. George Pitcher finds this objection to the representative theory completely persuasive (...)
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  6. Locke-ing onto Content.Frank Jackson - 2001 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 49:127-143.
    Our reading is a passage from John Locke, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book III, Chapter II, § 2.When a man speaks to another, it is that he may be understood; and the end of speech is that those sounds, as marks, may make known his ideas to the hearer. … Words being voluntary signs, they cannot be voluntary signs imposed by him on things he knows not. That would be to make them signs of nothing, sounds without signification.
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  7. Lockean Empathy.Colin Marshall - 2016 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):87-106.
    This paper offers an epistemic defense of empathy, drawing on John Locke's theory of ideas. Locke held that ideas of shape, unlike ideas of color, had a distinctive value: resembling qualities in their objects. I argue that the same is true of empathy, as when someone is pained by someone's pain. This means that empathy has the same epistemic value or objectivity that Locke and other early modern philosophers assigned to veridical perceptions of shape. For this to hold, pain and (...)
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  8. Locke, Malebranche and the Representative Theory.H. Matthews - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
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  9. Are Locke's 'Ideas' Images, Intentional Objects or Natural Signs?M. Ayers - 1986 - Locke Studies 25:3.
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  10. Locke's Arguments for the Resemblance Thesis Revisited.T. Heyd - 1994 - Locke Studies 25.
  11. Innate Ideas and Intentionality Descartes Vs Locke.Raffaella De Rosa - 2002 - Dissertation, Rutgers the State University of New Jersey - New Brunswick
    The topic of this dissertation is a discussion of the seventeenth century debate between Descartes and Locke over innate ideas. I propose a novel approach to the study of this debate. I argue that their disagreement over innate ideas is directly related to their differing views of how the content of ideas is determined and of what counts as having an idea in the mind. Approaching the controversy between Descartes and Locke from this perspective has allowed me to conclude that (...)
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  12. Locke's Doctrine of Representative Perception.Richard David Palmer - 1970 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
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  13. Is Locke an Imagist? Soles - 1999 - Locke Studies 30:17-66.
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  14. The Imagist Interpretation of Locke Revisited: A Reply to Ayers.Yasuhiko Tomida - 1996 - The Locke Newsletter 27:13-30.
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  15. A Reassessment of Locke's Theory of Cognition of the External World.Thomas Heyd - 1993 - Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada)
    Locke's Essay concerning Human Understanding has generally been read as primarily concerned with epistemology. In particular, it has been claimed that the Essay attempts to defeat epistemological skepticism, but fails in this enterprise because of the veiling character of Locke's ideas. By way of reexamination of the texts in question I show that epistemological skepticism is not the topic of the Essay, and that there is not sufficient reason to claim that Locke's account of knowledge leads to epistemological skepticism. I (...)
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  16. "Suppose I Am Pricked with a Pin": Locke, Reid and the Implications of Representationalism.Margaret Atherton - 1984 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 65 (2):149.
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  17. Locke and Representative Perception.J. L. Mackie - 1998 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Locke. Oxford University Press.
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  18. Locke on the Intentionality of Sensory Ideas.Ralph Schumacher - 2008 - In Kärkkäinen Knuuttila (ed.), Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. pp. 271--283.
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  19. Locke on Sensory Representation.Martha Brandt Bolton - 2004 - In Ralph Schumacher (ed.), Perception and Reality: From Descartes to the Present. Mentis.
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  20. J.Locke: del la representación a la expresión.Pedro José Herráiz Martínez - 2004 - Estudios Filosóficos 53 (154):527-540.
    El hecho de que este año 2004 se cumpla el tercer centenario de la muerte de J. Locke ya de por sí es una ocasión para repasar su pensamiento como uno de los más influyentes en la tradición filosófica, especialmente en la anglosajona. Más oportuno aún es repensarlo a la luz de las consecuencias de sus planteamientos no sustancialistas. En el terreno gnoseo lógico, si de la sustancia no tenemos una idea clara y distinta entonces se alza con toda crudeza (...)
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  21. Intentionality Bifurcated: A Lesson from Early Modern Philosophy?Lionel Shapiro - 2013 - In Martin Lenz & Anik Waldow (eds.), Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy: Nature and Norms in Thought. Springer.
    This paper examines the pressures leading two very different Early Modern philosophers, Descartes and Locke, to invoke two ways in which thought is directed at objects. According to both philosophers, I argue, the same idea can simultaneously count as “of” two different objects—in two different senses of the phrase ‘idea of’. One kind of intentional directedness is invoked in answering the question What is it to think that thus-and-so? The other kind is invoked in answering the question What accounts for (...)
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  22. Lockean Ideas as Intentional Contents.Gabor -Forrai - 2005 - In Gabor Forrai George Kampis (ed.), Intentionality: Past and Future.
    The paper argues for the view advocated by Yolton that Locke's ideas are best viewed as intentional contents. Drawing on Smith and McIntyre's distincition between object- and content-theories of intentionality I seek it show that it belongs to the second category. The argument relies mainly on the analysis of Locke's discussion of meaning, the reality and adequacy of ideas and real essence.
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  23. Philosophie des ressemblances contre philosophie des universaux chez Locke.Geneviève Brykman - 1995 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (4):439 - 454.
    Tandis que l'histoire de la philosophie est traversée par la dichotomie entre le réalisme des universaux et le nominalisme, on tend à négliger la position intermédiaire — le conceptualisme — dont on a fait de Locke le plus illustre représentant, mais qu'on a tenu pour disqualifié par les célèbres critiques de Berkeley ou Leibniz. On peut cependant montrer que le conceptualisme est doublé d'une ontologie sous-jacente qui pourrait fournir aux philosophes contemporains une alternative originale à la philosophie des universaux. Whereas (...)
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  24. What is Locke's Theory of Representation?Walter Ott - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1077-1095.
    On a currently popular reading of Locke, an idea represents its cause, or what God intended to be its cause. Against Martha Bolton and my former self (among others), I argue that Locke cannot hold such a view, since it sins against his epistemology and theory of abstraction. I argue that Locke is committed to a resemblance theory of representation, with the result that ideas of secondary qualities are not representations.
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