Jean-Paul Sartre

Edited by Matthew Eshleman (University of North Carolina at Wilmington)
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  1. Jean-Paul Sartre: Political Philosophy.Storm Heter - unknown - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Sartre, Jean-Paul — A. Existentialism.Author unknown - unknown - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Sartre on the responsibility of the individual in violent groups.Jennifer Mei Sze Ang - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-20.
    This paper examines the tools used to mediate intersubjectivity as a central element in Jean-Paul Sartre’s phenomenological theory of ensembles. It first presents a brief account of ordinary individuals acting in and through violent groups from the viewpoints of psychology and phenomenology. Next, using Sartre’s ontology of consciousness, the paper establishes the phenomenological structure of consciousness and intersubjectivity to explain, with recent psychological findings, how individual agents in violent groups come to deny their moral responsibility for the group’s ideology and (...)
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  4. Love and Entitlement: Sartre and Beauvoir on the Nature of Jealousy.Robert P. Brenner - forthcoming - Hypatia.
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  5. Do Immortals Need an Eject Button? Sartre and the Importance of Always Having an Exit.Adam Buben - forthcoming - Wiley: European Journal of Philosophy.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  6. Do Immortals Need an Eject Button? Sartre and the Importance of Always Having an Exit.Adam Buben - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    European Journal of Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  7. Sartre antihumaniste: Antisujectivisme, marxisme critique, postcolonialisme.Alex J. Feldman - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-4.
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  8. From Phenomenology Construct Dialectics. Jean-Paul Sartre Adaptation of Hegel.Holger Glinka - forthcoming - Hegel-Studien.
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  9. The Presence of Saint Paul in the Religious Works of Jean de Sponde.Robert Griffin - forthcoming - Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance.
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  10. The Secret Smiles of Things: Sartre’s Realism Reconsidered.Simon Gusman - forthcoming - Human Studies:1-19.
    In this article, I argue against a widespread misconception concerning the nature of things in Sartre’s philosophy. Sartre’s conception of the nature of things concerns the idea that outside of consciousness a single undifferentiated mass of brute being exists which is divided into definitive things by consciousness. I propose a different reading of Sartre’s realism. Such a reading is based primarily on Nausea, Being and Nothingness and Consciousness of Self and Knowledge of Self states that, contra common conception, there is (...)
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  11. Jean-Paul Sartre and Benny Levy, Hope Now: The 1980 Interviews.D. Macey - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  12. Lewis R. Gordon, Fanon and the Crisis of European Man.D. Macey - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
  13. Ronald E. Santoni, Bad Faith, Good Faith, and Authenticity in Sartre's Early Philosophy.D. Macey - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  14. Remembrance of Genet's Passing: Jean Genet's Tomb.Serge Dominique Menager & Vanessa Samways - forthcoming - Theoria.
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  15. The Mind’s Presence to Itself: In Search of Non‐Intentional Awareness.Jonathan Mitchell - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    According to some philosophers, the mind enjoys a form of presence to itself. That is to say, in addition to being aware of whatever objects it is aware of, it is also (co-presently) aware of itself. This paper explores the proposal that we should think about this kind of experiential-presence in terms of a form of non-intentional awareness. Various candidates for the relevant form of awareness, as constituting supposed non-intentional experiential-presence, are considered and are shown to encounter significant problems. The (...)
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  16. Two Irreducible Classes of Emotional Experiences: Affective Imaginings and Affective Perceptions.Jonathan Mitchell - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    A view of prominence in the philosophy of emotion is that emotional experiences are not self-standing intentional experiences. Instead, they inherit the intentional content they have from their cognitive bases. One implication is that emotions whose intentional contents differ in terms of the modal and temporal properties of the relevant particular object – because the intentional contents on which they are based differ in these respects – nonetheless need not differ qua emotion-type. This leads to the same-emotional attitude, different content (...)
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  17. Sartre's Philosophy of Freedom.Maurice Natanson - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  18. Jean-Paul Sartre's Philosophy of Freedom.Maurice Natanson - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
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  19. Many faces, plural looks: Enactive intersubjectivity contra Sartre and Levinas.Sarah Pawlett-Jackson - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-23.
    In recent years, work in cognitive science on human subjectivity as 4E has found a significant precedent in, connection with and enrichment from phenomenological understandings of the human person. Correspondingly, both disciplines have shed light on the nature of intersubjectivity in a complementary way. In this paper I highlight an underexplored aspect of phenomenological and 4E understandings of intersubjectivity, namely that these approaches make space for the possibility of properly intersubjective interactions with more than one other person at once. This (...)
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  20. Sartre’s Imaginary and the Problem of Whiteness.Betty Jean Stoneman - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s failures in Black Orpheus have been widely and rightly explicated by a number of theorists, most notably Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire. Sartre has rightly been criticized for imp...
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  21. Sartre’s Imaginary and the Problem of Whiteness.Betty Jean Stoneman - forthcoming - Philosophy and Social Criticism.
    Jean-Paul Sartre’s failures in Black Orpheus have been widely and rightly explicated by a number of theorists, most notably Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire. Sartre has rightly been criticized for imp...
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  22. La Ontologia de Sartre En Su Aplicacion Concreta: Jean Genet.Marcela Cinta Vazquez - forthcoming - Aletheia: Anuario de Filosofía.
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  23. Sartre and Marion on Intentionality and Phenomenality.King-Ho Leung - 2022 - Theory, Culture and Society 39 (1):41-60.
    This article offers a reading of Jean-Paul Sartre’s phenomenology in light of Jean-Luc Marion’s more recent phenomenology. It may seem odd to compare Sartre to Marion, given that Sartre is well-known for his avowed atheism and his account of intentionality while Marion is primarily known for his work on religious phenomena and counter-intentionality. However, this article shows that there are many ways in which Sartre anticipates Marion’s work on phenomenological reduction and excessive phenomenality. By reading Sartre’s phenomenology in light of (...)
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  24. Reading Nausea Through Either / Or: An Aesthetic and Ethical Perspective.Zachary Altman - 2021 - Reed Journal of Existentialism 22:79-91.
    Literature, in particular philosophical literature, proves to be particularly challenging when read in isolation from the philosophy it comes from. Reading Sarte’s Nausea through Kierkegaard illuminates important themes of language, music, the ethical and aesthetic, and immediacy in both Nausea and Kierkegaard’s various pseudonymous works. The comparison here is extremely fruitful given the poetic and literary form of Kierkegaard’s work, especially against this particular work from Sartre. The themes in Nausea that are examined are interestingly not present in his other (...)
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  25. Heidegger and Sartre on the Problem of Other Minds.Yunlong Cao - 2021 - The Hemlock Papers 18:15-26.
    Existentialists such as Martin Heidegger and Jean-Paul Sar- tre have offered some interesting responses to the skeptical problem of other minds. However, their contributions are sometimes overlooked in the analytic study of this problem. A traditional view may think the existentialists focus on the ethical issues among conscious minds and take for granted that individuals’ experiences are within a world with others. This paper aims to identify and reconstruct two transcendental arguments on other minds from Heidegger’s and Sartre’s philosophy. I (...)
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  26. The Art of Revolutionary Praxis.Duane H. Davis - 2021 - Sartre Studies International 27 (1):76-98.
    Merleau-Ponty, in Humanism and Terror, addresses the spectrum of problems related to revolutionary action. His essay, Eye and Mind, is best known as a contribution to aesthetics. A common structure exists in these apparently disparate works. We must reject the illusion of subjective clairvoyance as a standard of revolutionary praxis; but also we must reject any idealised light of reason that illuminates all—that promises a history without shadows. The revolutionary nature of an act must be established as such through praxis. (...)
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  27. Sartre’s Phenomenology and Drama: The Case of Dirty Hands.Jane Duran - 2021 - Metaphilosophy 52 (5):642-649.
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  28. Sartre and Beauvoir on Women’s Psychological Oppression.Mary Edwards - 2021 - Sartre Studies International 27 (1):46-75.
    This paper aims to show that Sartre’s later work represents a valuable resource for feminist scholarship that remains relatively untapped. It analyses Sartre’s discussions of women’s attitude towards their situation from the 1940s, 1960s, and 1970s, alongside Beauvoir’s account of women’s situation in The Second Sex, to trace the development of Sartre’s thought on the structure of gendered experience. It argues that Sartre transitions from reducing psychological oppression to self-deception in Being and Nothingness to construing women as ‘survivors’ of it (...)
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  29. Toward an Ethics of Nothingness: Sartre, Supervenience, and the Necessity of My Contingency.Jose Luis Fernandez - 2021 - Humanities Bulletin 4 (1):9-19.
    Ethics normally proceeds by establishing some kind of ground from which norms can be derived for human action. However, no such terra firma is found in Jean-Paul Sartre’s Being and Nothingness, which instead lays down a sedimentary soil consisting of a blend of nothingness and contingency. This paper aims to show how Sartre is able to build an ethical theory from this seemingly groundless mixture, and it proceeds in three sections. Section one aims to disentangle the relation between the for-itself (...)
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  30. Analoga and Phantasmata: On the Intuitiveness of Imagination in Husserl and Sartre.Alain Flajoliet - 2021 - Research in Phenomenology 51 (2):221-245.
    In this essay, I study the departure performed in The Imaginary from the Husserlian position spanning from the Logical Investigations and the 1904/1905 lectures on the imagination. In Sartre’s conception, the imagination in its two forms is never intuitive. Moreover, in an act of imagination we can never find immanent sensible contents. In Husserl, the imagination in its two forms, is a sensible intuition, like perception. Furthermore, every act of imagination apprehends immanent sensible contents.
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  31. A Malady of the Left and an Ethics of Communism.Andrey Gordienko - 2021 - Sartre Studies International 27 (1):99-128.
    One cannot be responsible for a generic truth, argues Badiou in his critical rejoinder to Sartre; one can only be its militant. Challenging Badiou’s formulation, I propose that his plea for a new stage of the communist hypothesis, which unfolds in the wake of subjective decomposition of the Left, must draw upon the Sartrean notion of collective responsibility to affirm interminable inscription of the egalitarian axiom in a novel political sequence without forcing a violent realisation of equality. Encapsulated in an (...)
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  32. Accounting for Imaginary Presence.Di Huang - 2021 - Sartre Studies International 27 (1):1-22.
    Both Husserl and Sartre speak of quasi-presence in their descriptions of the lived experience of imagination, and for both philosophers, accounting for quasi-presence means developing an account of the hyle proper to imagination. Guided by the perspective of fulfillment, Husserl’s theory of imaginary quasi-presence goes through three stages. Having experimented first with a depiction-model and then a perception-model, Husserl’s mature theory appeals to his innovative conception of inner consciousness. This elegant account nevertheless fails to do justice to the facticity and (...)
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  33. Beyond the Minimal Self.Di Huang - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (3):691-708.
    This article reconstructs Sartre’s theory of selfhood against the background of the contemporary debate between minimal-self theories and narrative-self theories. I argue that Sartre’s theory incorporates both an emphasis on the singular first-person perspective, which is characteristic of minimal-self theories, and an emphasis on the practical intelligibility of experience, which is characteristic of narrative-self theories. The distinctiveness of the Sartrean combination of these motifs consists in its idea of the necessary ideal-relatedness of consciousness. According to Sartre, the logical structure of (...)
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  34. Camus and Sartre on the Absurd.Hannah H. Kim - 2021 - Philosophers' Imprint 21 (32).
    In this paper, I highlight the philosophical differences between Camus’s and Sartre’s notions of the absurd. “The absurd” is a technical term for both philosophers, and they mean different things by it. The Camusian absurd is a mismatch between theoretical reasoning and practical reasoning. The Sartrean absurd, in contrast, is our theoretical inability to explain contingency or existence. For Sartre, there is only relative, local absurdity; for Camus, the absurd is universal and absolute. I show how their different understandings of (...)
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  35. Three Interpretations of Freedom in Sartre's Being and Nothingness.Renxiang Liu - 2021 - The Humanistic Psychologist 49 (Advance online).
    My task in this article is to prepare a multilayered conceptual framework so that one can then read, from Being and Nothingness, an account of human freedom that is both psychologically relevant and ontologically acute. Crucial to this framework is a distinction between three interpretations of freedom: ontological freedom, psychological–practical freedom, and the psychologistic misinterpretation of freedom. First, I articulate the sense and extent of ontological freedom against the background of Sartre’s phenomenological ontology, comprising concepts such as the in-itself, the (...)
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  36. “A Kind of Magic”: Emotions, Imagination, Language – A Reading of Sartre.Claudio Majolino - 2021 - Research in Phenomenology 51 (2):200-220.
    This paper maintains that Sartre’s concept of magic has to be considered as a full-fledged and quite technical phenomenological concept. Such concept describes a very specific way in which one is able to be conscious-of-something and reveals some structural features of consciousness and its mode of existence. Moreover the “magical” cluster emotions-imagination-language also appears to be the existential matrix, as it were, from which fictions are generated: starting from the most original fiction of all, namely the constitutive fiction upon which (...)
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  37. Hannah Arendt Em Diálogo Com a Fenomenologia: Sartre, Merleau-Ponty E a Trama Entre Liberdade E Temporalidade.Alex de Campos Moura - 2021 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 62 (150):777-799.
    RESUMO Neste ensaio, discutiremos o modo como a relação entre liberdade e temporalidade aparece em momentos determinados da reflexão de Hannah Arendt, Sartre e Merleau-Ponty, tomando como eixo de investigação a maneira pela qual cada um deles concebe a articulação entre permanência e mudança na descrição da dinâmica temporal. Com isso, pretende-se estabelecer um horizonte de convergência e, em seu interior, explicitar dois encaminhamentos distintos para uma questão similar, mostrando como é possível estabelecer um eixo fenomenológico comum e, ao mesmo (...)
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  38. The Failed Atheism of Jean‐Paul Sartre.Marcos Antonio Norris - 2021 - Heythrop Journal 63 (1):96-110.
    The Heythrop Journal, Volume 63, Issue 1, Page 96-110, January 2022.
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  39. Sartre’s Three Gods.Daniel O’Shiel - 2021 - Sartre Studies International 27 (1):23-45.
    I argue for three different concepts of God in Being and Nothingness. First I review the relevant scholarship with regard to Sartre, religion, and God. Second I show how Sartre uses three Gods in his ontological system: God as Nature, God as radical Otherness, and God as absolute Value. Third I show that Sartre’s conception of the imaginary explains how a purer, more theoretical conception of God can be perverted into more anthropocentrised and anthropomorphised versions. Fourth I consider the consequences (...)
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  40. Do singular ao singular: finitude, trans-historicidade e compreensão em Sartre.Marcelo Prates - 2021 - Griot : Revista de Filosofia 21 (3):268-282.
    This article aims to analyze in Sartre's philosophy the relation between the subjectivities from the notion of understanding. Differentiating knowledge of understanding, Sartre proposes that by understanding it is possible to apprehend subjectivity without making it an objective knowledge. Although he points this in several of his studies is the conference on Kierkegaard that this thesis becomes more manifest. In this article we try to demonstrate that this thesis modifies a whole perception about the freedom, so that it as a (...)
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  41. Body, Self and Others: Harding, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty on Intersubjectivity.Brentyn J. Ramm - 2021 - Philosophies 6 (4):100.
    Douglas Harding developed a unique first-person experimental approach for investigating consciousness that is still relatively unknown in academia. In this paper, I present a critical dialogue between Harding, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty on the phenomenology of the body and intersubjectivity. Like Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, Harding observes that from the first-person perspective, I cannot see my own head. He points out that visually speaking nothing gets in the way of others. I am radically open to others and the world. Neither does my (...)
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  42. Being to Being: Sartre, Ramchandra Gandhi, and Abhinavagupta on Intersubjectivity.Joshua Stoll - 2021 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 13 (2):167-179.
    ABSTRACT This paper explores and critiques Sartre’s conception of being-for-others from a non-dual perspective. His conception of intersubjectivity as being-for-others views the primary relation between oneself and others as oppressive and objectifying; the other, he says, is the death of my possibilities. It will be argued, however, that others also represent precisely the birth of one’s possibilities. To this end, we will interpret the relation of being to being from a non-dual orientation through the work of the contemporary Indian philosopher (...)
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  43. Sartre’s Critique of Dialectical Reason and New Materialism.Daniel Sullivan - 2021 - Angelaki 26 (6):31-48.
    Sartre’s late work – the Critique of Dialectical Reason – attempted to develop a new theory of praxis emphasizing themes that anticipate new materialist and biopolitical turns in the humanities. Sp...
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  44. Meditations on the Problem of Dirty Hands: Can One Do Right by Doing Evil?Mika Suojanen - 2021 - In Katriina Kajannes (ed.), Hyvyys. Jyväskylä: Athanor. pp. 107-118.
    I examine the problem of dirty hands, suggesting that there is a possibility for the individual decision-maker to do bad to achieve good consequences. According to Consequentialism, because the consequences are what counts in morality, then there seems to be no phenomenon of dirty hands. I will first present what Jean-Paul Sartre meant by the problem of dirty hands, after which I will describe how contemporary philosophers have identified that problem. Finally, I will argue that Consequentialism does not negate the (...)
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  45. Sartre and the Transformation of Victimhood in Saint Genet.Ruud Welten - 2021 - Philosophy Today 65 (4):773-788.
    In this contribution, a poetical transformation of victimhood is explored as described by Jean-Paul Sartre in his Saint Genet, a study of the writer Jean Genet. First, the question is answered what Sartre, who famously wrote “There are no innocent victims,” has to say about victimhood. Second, an outline is given of the context of Jean Genet’s work and the role he plays in Sartre’s thinking. There is a clear line from Sartre’s earlier study of Baudelaire to Saint Genet. Both (...)
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  46. The Paradoxical Body. The Tensegrity of Corporeality in Sartre’s Phenomenology.Federico Zilio - 2021 - Teoria 41 (1):169-187.
    The body is the core of our internal and external experiences. The existential and phenomenological complexity of the body is presented by Sartre in Being and Nothingness, and his multidimensional approach to corporeality has sometimes been interpreted as a failed attempt to overcome Cartesian ontology and the mind-body problem. This paper aims to reconsider the Sartrean approach not as a return of Cartesian dualism, but as an investigation of the irreducible dynamics of corporeality, which not only overcome Cartesianism but also (...)
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  47. In Praise of Sarah Richmond's Translation of L'Être Et le Néant.Matthew C. Eshleman - 2020 - Sartre Studies International 26 (1):1-15.
    This article surveys most of the recent reviews of Sarah Richmond’s excellent new translation of L’Être et le néant. It offers some close textual comparisons between Richmond’s translation, Hazel Barnes’ translation, and the Checklist of Errors of Hazel Barnes’ Translation of L’Être et le néant. This article concludes that Richmond delivers a higher semantic resolution translation that overcomes nearly all the liabilities found in Barnes and does so without sacrificing much by way of readability.
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  48. Fear, Anxiety, and Boredom.Lauren Freeman & Andreas Elpidorou - 2020 - In Thomas Szanto & Hilge Landweer (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Phenomenology of Emotion. New York: Routledge. pp. 392-402.
    Phenomenology's central insight is that affectivity is not an inconsequential or contingent characteristic of human existence. Emotions, moods, sentiments, and feelings are not accidents of human existence. They do not happen to happen to us. Rather, we exist the way we do because of and through our affective experiences. Phenomenology thus acknowledges the centrality and ubiquity of affectivity by noting the multitude of ways in which our existence is permeated by our various affective experiences. Yet, it also insists that such (...)
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  49. The Foundations of a Mexican Humanism in Emilio Uranga's Análisis Del Ser Del Mexicano.Sergio A. Gallegos-Ordorica - 2020 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 20 (1):13-18.
    In this paper, I examine the humanism articulated by Jean-Paul Sartre in Existentialism is a humanism and I show that his proposal is underpinned by some problematic assumptions and biases that shape its deployment. I also argue that the Mexican philosopher Emilio Uranga offers us in his most important work, Analísis del Ser del Mexicano, some conceptual resources that allow us to articulate a humanism that does not fall prey to the problems faced by that of Sartre.
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  50. Transcendentality and Nothingness in Sartre's Atheistic Ontology.King-Ho Leung - 2020 - Philosophy 95 (4):471-495.
    This article offers a reading of Sartre's phenomenological ontology in light of the pre-modern understanding of ‘transcendentals’ as universal properties and predicates of all determinate beings. Drawing on Sartre's transcendental account of nothingness in his early critique of Husserl as well as his discussion of ‘determination as negation’ in Being and Nothingness, this article argues that Sartre's universal predicate of ‘the not’ (le non) could be understood in a similar light to the medieval scholastic conception of transcendentals. But whereas the (...)
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