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  1. Los números y el contar en Berkeley y Hume.Mauricio Algalan - 2015 - Dissertation, Universidad Panamericana Sede México
    Se puede considerar que Berkeley y Hume son antecedentes filosóficos del Formalismo Matemático. Ambos sostienen una visión instrumentalista y no-realista de las matemáticas. En la conferencia se explora las diferencias y similitudes de ambos autores, así como el porque se les puede considerar ser antecesores del Formalismo.
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  2. The Intellectual Powers of the Human Mind.Lorne Falkenstein - 2023 - In Aaron Garrett & James A. Harris (eds.), Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century II: Method, Metaphysics, Mind, Language. Oxford University Press. pp. 225-54.
    This chapter examines what Hume and Reid had to say about what Reid called our intellectual powers: sensation, conception, perception, memory, abstraction, judgement, and reasoning. In the process it examines their opposed views on the nature of mind, on the representation of space and the spatiality of mental content, on temporal experience and the metaphysics of time, on the conception of non-existent objects, and on conceivability and possibility. The chapter critically examines what each had to say in his own defence (...)
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  3. Hume, the philosophy of science and the scientific tradition.Matias Slavov - 2019 - In Angela Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), _The Humean Mind_. New York: Routledge.
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  4. The Pragmatic Justification of Induction.Pappagllo Sergio - 2022 - Dissertation, Università Degli Studi Roma Tre
    This M.A. thesis explores the intricate Problem of Induction, contrasting three seminal approaches: Hume's habit-centric view, Reichenbach's emphasis on the Principle of Uniformity of Nature, and Strawson's belief in the innate rationality of induction. While Hume's perspective lays the groundwork for Kant's a priori and Cleve's a posteriori validation, Reichenbach and Salmon present pragmatic justifications, underscoring the methodological and probabilistic underpinnings of inductive reasoning, specifying epistemological ignorance as a guidance for the optimality criteria. Strawson, challenging prevailing notions, posits that induction, (...)
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  5. 5. Wie ist eine empirische Wissenschaft vom Menschen möglich?Astrid von der Lühe - 1997 - In Jens Kulenkampff (ed.), David Hume: Eine Untersuchung Ber den Menschlichen Verstand. Akademie Verlag. pp. 53-71.
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  6. Hume.W. H. Newton-Smith - 2017 - In W. H. Newton‐Smith (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 165–168.
    David Hume is the greatest figure in the empiricist tradition in philosophy and was a particular source of inspiration for the logical positivists (see logical positivism). Hume was born in 1711 and entered Edinburgh University at the age of 12. After graduating, he had a varied career in commerce, diplomacy, as a librarian, and as a writer of history. Twice he was secretary to General St Clair and on one occasion set off with him on an expedition to drive the (...)
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  7. A Progress of Sentiments: Reflections on Hume’s Treatises. Harvard: Harvard University Press, 1991. Annette Baier.Colin Smith - 1994 - Philosophica 53.
  8. A critical introduction to the metaphysics of modality.Andrea Borghini - 2016 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    A Critical Introduction to the Metaphysics of Modality examines the eight main contemporary theories of possibility behind a central metaphysical topic. Covering modal skepticism, modal expressivism, modalism, modal realism, ersatzism, modal fictionalism, modal agnosticism, and the new modal actualism, this comprehensive introduction to modality places contemporary debates in an historical context. Beginning with a historical overview, Andrea Borghini discusses Parmenides and Zeno; looks at how central Medieval authors such as Aquinas, and Buridan prepared the ground for the Early Modern radical (...)
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  9. Social facts and legal facts : perils of Hume's Guillotine.Tomasz Gizbert-Studnicki - 2021 - In Torben Spaak (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Legal Positivism. Cambridge University Press.
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  10. What is a Law of Nature?David Malet Armstrong - 1983 - Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of a crucial and controversial topic in metaphysics and the philosophy of science: the status of the laws of nature. D. M. Armstrong works out clearly and in comprehensive detail a largely original view that laws are relations between properties or universals. The theory is continuous with the views on universals and more generally with the scientific realism that Professor Armstrong has advanced in earlier publications. He begins here by mounting an attack on the orthodox and (...)
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  11. On the (in)significance of Hume’s Law.Samuele Chilovi & Daniel Wodak - 2022 - Philosophical Studies 179 (2):633-653.
    Hume’s Law that one cannot derive an “ought” from an “is” has often been deemed to bear a significance that extends far beyond logic. Repeatedly, it has been invoked as posing a serious threat to views about normativity: naturalism in metaethics and positivism in jurisprudence. Yet in recent years, a puzzling asymmetry has emerged: while the view that Hume’s Law threatens naturalism has largely been abandoned (due mostly to Pigden’s work, see e.g. Pigden 1989), the thought that Hume’s Law is (...)
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  12. Hume's Appendix Problem and Associative Connections in the Treatise and Enquiry.Daniel R. Siakel - 2018 - Hume Studies 44 (1):23-50.
    Given the difficulty of characterizing the quandary introduced in Hume’s Appendix to the Treatise, coupled with the alleged “underdetermination” of the text, it is striking how few commentators have considered whether Hume addresses and/or redresses the problem after 1740—in the first Enquiry, for example. This is not only unfortunate, but ironic; for, in the Appendix, Hume mentions that more mature reasonings may reconcile whatever contradiction(s) he has in mind. I argue that Hume’s 1746 letter to Lord Kames foreshadows a subtle, (...)
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  13. David Hume's Contribution to Social Science.Wilson D. Wallis - 1942 - In M. C. Nahm & F. P. Clarke (eds.), Philosophical Essays in Honor of Edgar Arthur Singer, Jr. Cambridge University Press. pp. 358-372.
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  14. Universal Gravitation and the (Un)Intelligibility of Natural Philosophy.Matias Slavov - 2019 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (1):129-157.
    This article centers on Hume’s position on the intelligibility of natural philosophy. To that end, the controversy surrounding universal gravitation shall be scrutinized. It is very well-known that Hume sides with the Newtonian experimentalist approach rather than with the Leibnizian demand for intelligibility. However, what is not clear is Hume’s overall position on the intelligibility of natural philosophy. It shall be argued that Hume declines Leibniz’s principle of intelligibility. However, Hume does not eschew intelligibility altogether; his concept of causation itself (...)
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  15. Hume's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Physical Science.Matias Slavov - 2020 - London: Bloomsbury Academic.
    This book contextualizes David Hume's philosophy of physical science, exploring both Hume's background in the history of early modern natural philosophy and its subsequent impact on the scientific tradition.
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  16. Causality and Hume’s foundational project.Miren Boehm - 2018 - In Angela Coventry & Alexander Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
    The last few decades have witnessed intense debates in Hume scholarship concerning Hume’s account of causation. At the core of the “old–new Hume” debate is the question of whether causation for Hume is more than mere regularity, in particular, whether Hume countenances necessary connections in mind-independent nature. This chapter assesses this debate against the background of Hume’s “foundational project” in the Treatise. The question of the role and import of Hume’s account of the idea of cause is examined and compared (...)
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  17. A Chemistry of Human Nature: Chemical Imagery in Hume’s Treatise.Tamás Demeter - 2017 - Early Science and Medicine 22 (2-3):208-228.
  18. Dutra, Hume e Goodman.João Paulo Monteiro - 1997 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 1 (2):291–296.
  19. Probability and Hume's Inductive Scepticism. [REVIEW]Michael Williams - 1975 - Philosophical Review 84 (3):453.
  20. Hume’s Fork and Mixed Mathematics.Matias Slavov - 2017 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 99 (1):102-119.
    Given the sharp distinction that follows from Hume’s Fork, the proper epistemic status of propositions of mixed mathematics seems to be a mystery. On the one hand, mathematical propositions concern the relation of ideas. They are intuitive and demonstratively certain. On the other hand, propositions of mixed mathematics, such as in Hume’s own example, the law of conservation of momentum, are also matter of fact propositions. They concern causal relations between species of objects, and, in this sense, they are not (...)
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  21. Elkin's Hume.Wilbur M. Urban - 1905 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 2 (14):383.
  22. Pietro Sforza Pallavicino’s Quest for Principles of Induction.Sven K. Knebel - 2001 - The Monist 84 (4):502-519.
    Though it is well known that Hume composed his Treatise and the first version of his essay On Miracles during his stay in La Flèche, this fact has not received the attention it surely deserves. What may have induced a gentleman from Edinburgh to bury himself in the library of a Jesuit college? While every historian of early modern philosophy is quick to credit La Flèche with having provided Descartes’s education, Burton’s amazement that Hume himself never alludes to this unique (...)
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  23. Essays concerning Hume's Natural Philosophy.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Jyväskylä
    The subject of this essay-based dissertation is Hume’s natural philosophy. The dissertation consists of four separate essays and an introduction. These essays do not only treat Hume’s views on the topic of natural philosophy, but his views are placed into a broader context of history of philosophy and science, physics in particular. The introductory section outlines the historical context, shows how the individual essays are connected, expounds what kind of research methodology has been used, and encapsulates the research contributions of (...)
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  24. Empiricism and Relationism Intertwined: Hume and Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 31 (2):247-263.
    Einstein acknowledged that his reading of Hume influenced the development of his special theory of relativity. In this article, I juxtapose Hume’s philosophy with Einstein’s philosophical analysis related to his special relativity. I argue that there are two common points to be found in their writings, namely an empiricist theory of ideas and concepts, and a relationist ontology regarding space and time. The main thesis of this article is that these two points are intertwined in Hume and Einstein.
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  25. Giancarlo Carabelli, Mauricio Ferrarini, Eric Forbes y otros: Scienza e filosofia scozzese nell' etá di Hume. [REVIEW]M. Costa - 1978 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 4 (2):170.
  26. Saggi e trattati morali, letterari, politici e economici.David Hume, Mario Dal Pra & Emanuele Ronchetti - 1974 - Unione Tipografico-Editrice Torinese.
  27. From is to ought: Another way.John F. Post - 2000
    Argues for an objective protomoral normativity in terms of what an adaptation is for, without falling victim to Hume's Law, open-question arguments, queerness arguments, and internalism/externalism debates. Also provides a general strategy for naturalizing objective moral normativity which is likewise proof against the usual-suspect objections.
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Hume: Logic
  1. Hume’s Principle, Bad Company, and the Axiom of Choice.Sam Roberts & Stewart Shapiro - 2023 - Review of Symbolic Logic 16 (4):1158-1176.
    One prominent criticism of the abstractionist program is the so-called Bad Company objection. The complaint is that abstraction principles cannot in general be a legitimate way to introduce mathematical theories, since some of them are inconsistent. The most notorious example, of course, is Frege’s Basic Law V. A common response to the objection suggests that an abstraction principle can be used to legitimately introduce a mathematical theory precisely when it is stable: when it can be made true on all sufficiently (...)
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  2. Abstraction and semantic presuppositions.Bahram Assadian - 2023 - Analysis 15 (3):419-428.
    According to the neo-Fregean abstractionism, numerical expressions of the form ‘the number of Fs’, introduced by Hume’s Principle, should be read as purportedly referential singular terms. I will explore the prospects of a version of abstractionism in which such expressions have presuppositional content, as in Strawson’s account. I will argue that the thesis that ‘the number of Fs’ semantically presupposes the existence of a number is inconsistent with the required ‘modest’ stipulative character of the truth of Hume’s Principle: since Hume’s (...)
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  3. Is, Ought, and Cut.Norbert Gratzl & Edi Pavlović - 2023 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 52 (4):1149-1169.
    In this paper we use proof-theoretic methods, specifically sequent calculi, admissibility of cut within them and the resultant subformula property, to examine a range of philosophically-motivated deontic logics. We show that for all of those logics it is a (meta)theorem that the Special Hume Thesis holds, namely that no purely normative conclusion follows non-trivially from purely descriptive premises (nor vice versa). In addition to its interest on its own, this also illustrates one way in which proof theory sheds light on (...)
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  4. Hume's Separability Principle, his Dictum, and their Implications.Graham Clay - forthcoming - Mind.
    Hsueh M. Qu has recently argued that Hume's famed "Separability Principle" from the Treatise entangles him in a contradiction. Qu offers a modified principle as a solution but also argues that the mature Hume would not have needed to avail himself of it, given that Hume's arguments in the first Enquiry do not depend on this principle in any form. To the contrary, I show that arguments in the first Enquiry depend on this principle, but I agree with Qu that (...)
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  5. Hume's Incredible Demonstrations.Graham Clay - 2022 - Hume Studies 47 (1):55-77.
    Commentators have rightly focused on the reasons why Hume maintains that the conclusions of skeptical arguments cannot be believed, as well as on the role these arguments play in Hume’s justification of his account of the mind. Nevertheless, Hume’s interpreters should take more seriously the question of whether Hume holds that these arguments are demonstrations. Only if the arguments are demonstrations do they have the requisite status to prove Hume’s point—and justify his confidence—about the nature of the mind’s belief-generating faculties. (...)
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  6. The Bad Company Objection and the Extensionality of Frege’s Logic.Vincenzo Ciccarelli - 2020 - Perspectiva Filosófica 47 (2):231-247.
    According to the Bad Company objection, the fact that Frege’s infamous Basic Law V instantiates the general definitional pattern of higher-order abstraction principles is a good reason to doubt the soundness of this sort of definitions. In this paper I argue against this objection by showing that the definitional pattern of abstraction principles – as extrapolated from §64 of Frege’s Grundlagen– includes an additional requirement (which I call the specificity condition) that is not satisfied by the Basic Law V while (...)
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  7. Beall-ing O.Jeremiah Joven Joaquin - forthcoming - Logic and Logical Philosophy:1.
    In “A neglected reply to Prior’s dilemma” Beall [2012] presents a Weak Kleene framework where Prior’s dilemma for Hume’s no-ought-fromis thesis fails. It fails in the framework because addition, the inference rule that one of its horns relies on, is invalid. In this paper, we show that a more general result is necessary for the viability of Beall’s proposal – a result, which implies that Hume’s thesis holds in the proposed framework. We prove this result and thus show that Beall’s (...)
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  8. Is Hume's Principle Analytic?George Boolos - 1997 - In Richard G. Heck (ed.), Language, Thought, and Logic: Essays in Honour of Michael Dummett. Oxford University Press.
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  9. Hume’o giljotina ir teisinis pozityvizmas.Milda Baltrimienė - 2018 - Problemos 93:154.
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  10. Generalizing boolos’ theorem.Graham Leach-Krouse - 2017 - Review of Symbolic Logic 10 (1):80-91.
    It’s well known that it’s possible to extract, from Frege’s Grudgesetze, an interpretation of second-order Peano Arithmetic in the theory  HP2, whose sole axiom is Hume’s principle. What’s less well known is that, in Die Grundlagen Der Arithmetic §82–83 Boolos (2011), George Boolos provided a converse interpretation of HP2 in PA2 . Boolos’ interpretation can be used to show that the Frege’s construction allows for any model of PA2 to be recovered from some model of HP2. So the space (...)
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  11. Frege's Cardinals Do Not Always Obey Hume's Principle.Gregory Landini - 2017 - History and Philosophy of Logic 38 (2):127-153.
    Hume's Principle, dear to neo-Logicists, maintains that equinumerosity is both necessary and sufficient for sameness of cardinal number. All the same, Whitehead demonstrated in Principia Mathematica's logic of relations that Cantor's power-class theorem entails that Hume's Principle admits of exceptions. Of course, Hume's Principle concerns cardinals and in Principia's ‘no-classes’ theory cardinals are not objects in Frege's sense. But this paper shows that the result applies as well to the theory of cardinal numbers as objects set out in Frege's Grundgesetze. (...)
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  12. Finitude and Hume’s Principle.Richard G. Heck - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 26 (6):589-617.
    The paper formulates and proves a strengthening of ‘Frege’s Theorem’, which states that axioms for second-order arithmetic are derivable in second-order logic from Hume’s Principle, which itself says that the number of Fs is the same as the number ofGs just in case the Fs and Gs are equinumerous. The improvement consists in restricting this claim to finite concepts, so that nothing is claimed about the circumstances under which infinite concepts have the same number. ‘Finite Hume’s Principle’ also suffices for (...)
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  13. Hume’s principle, beginnings.Albert Visser - 2011 - Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (1):114-129.
    In this note we derive Robinson???s Arithmetic from Hume???s Principle in the context of very weak theories of classes and relations.
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  14. Hume's Law.G. R. Grice & R. Edgley - 1970 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 44 (1):89-120.
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  15. Is Hume's Principle Analytic?Crispin Wright - 1999 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 40 (1):6-30.
    One recent `neologicist' claim is that what has come to be known as "Frege's Theorem"–the result that Hume's Principle, plus second-order logic, suffices for a proof of the Dedekind-Peano postulate–reinstates Frege's contention that arithmetic is analytic. This claim naturally depends upon the analyticity of Hume's Principle itself. The present paper reviews five misgivings that developed in various of George Boolos's writings. It observes that each of them really concerns not `analyticity' but either the truth of Hume's Principle or our entitlement (...)
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  16. Hume on Deduction.Charles Echelbarger - 1987 - Philosophy Research Archives 13:351-365.
    In this paper, the author discusses the feasibility of constructing a Humean model of the psychological realities of categorical propositions and syllogistic deduction by employing only Hume’s kinds of “ideas” and kinds of mental operations on ideas which Hume explicitly or implicitly postulated in his theory of discursive thinking.
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  17. Why, in 1902, wasn't Frege prepared to accept Hume's Principle as the Primitive Law for his Logicist Program?Kazuyuki Nomoto - 2000 - Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 9 (5):219-230.
  18. ‘Is’, ‘Ought’ and the Voluntaristic Fallacy.Oswald Hanfling - 1997 - Philosophy 72 (282):537.
    The view that ‘ought’ cannot be deduced from ‘is’, credited to Hume as a major insight into the nature of morality, is surprisingly easy to refute. What they are doing is evil. Therefore, they ought not to do it. Here we have a case of deducing ‘ought’ from ‘is’. The conclusion follows, because ‘ought not’ is analytic to ‘evil’. ‘Ah, but that's just what is wrong with the example: the premise is not a pure “is”; it contains an “ought”, though (...)
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  19. Hume’s Principle and Axiom V Reconsidered: Critical Reflections on Frege and His Interpreters.Matthias Schirn - 2006 - Synthese 148 (1):171-227.
    In this paper, I shall discuss several topics related to Frege's paradigms of second-order abstraction principles and his logicism. The discussion includes a critical examination of some controversial views put forward mainly by Robin Jeshion, Tyler Burge, Crispin Wright, Richard Heck and John MacFarlane. In the introductory section, I try to shed light on the connection between logical abstraction and logical objects. The second section contains a critical appraisal of Frege's notion of evidence and its interpretation by Jeshion, the introduction (...)
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  20. In good company? On hume’s principle and the assignment of numbers to infinite concepts.Paolo Mancosu - 2015 - Review of Symbolic Logic 8 (2):370-410.
    In a recent article, I have explored the historical, mathematical, and philosophical issues related to the new theory of numerosities. The theory of numerosities provides a context in which to assign numerosities to infinite sets of natural numbers in such a way as to preserve the part-whole principle, namely if a set A is properly included in B then the numerosity of A is strictly less than the numerosity of B. Numerosities assignments differ from the standard assignment of size provided (...)
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  21. The Is-Ought Problem: An Investigation in Philosophical Logic.G. Schurz - 2000 - Studia Logica 65 (3):432-434.
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  22. Tesi di Hume e sistemi di logica deontica.Sergio Galvan - 1988 - Epistemologia 11 (2):183.
  23. How far can Hume is-ought thesis be generalized,(vol 20, pg 37, 1991).G. Schurz - 1995 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 24 (6):667-668.
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