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  1. Hume’s Theory of Ideas - New Hume Vs. Old Hume.Sunny Yang - 2019 - Modern Philosophy 13:5-47.
  2. Hume on Space and Time : A Limited Defense.Jonathan Cottrell - 2019 - In Angela Michelle Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge.
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  3. A Neglected Aspect of Hume’s Nominalism.Ruth Weintraub - 2022 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):197-207.
    In this paper, I point to two problems engendered by two assumptions that Hume makes. The first is his nominalism: the view that all ideas are fully determinate with respect to all the aspects that are represented in them. The second, perhaps hitherto unnoticed, is that names denote ideas. I propose some solutions, aiming to find one that is Humean.
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  4. A Fragmented Unity: A Narrative Answer to the Problem of the Unity of the Self in Hume.Lorenzo Greco - 2022 - In Dan O'Brien (ed.), Hume on the Self and Personal Identity. London: pp. 201-22.
  5. Disguising Change: Hume and Cognitive Science on the Continued Existence of Selves.Mark Collier - 2022 - In Hume on the Self and Personal Identity. pp. 275-293.
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  6. Recasting Hume and Early Modern Philosophy: Selected Essays, by Paul Russell.Annemarie Butler - forthcoming - Mind.
  7. Facts and Values After David Hume.Pentti Määttänen - forthcoming - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique:1-13.
    According to David Hume values do not belong to the world of facts and cannot be derived from facts. However, Hume’s argument is based on questionable presumptions. His conception of experience as sense perception is erroneous. On contemporary standards it is simply false because sense organs are not channels that passively receive inputs from the world. It is too narrow as it does not take the role of action into account. Further, Hume’s argument is based on the dichotomy between external (...)
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  8. Predication and Hume's Conceivability Principle.Hsueh Qu - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
  9. Time for Hume's Unchanging Objects.Miren Boehm & Maité Cruz - forthcoming - Philosophers' Imprint.
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  10. Epistemology, Semantics, Ontology, and David Hume.Galen Strawson - 2000 - Facta Philosophica 2 (1):129-147.
  11. Notas sobre as traduções das obras de David Hume para o português.Jaimir Conte - 2020 - Revista Estudos Humeanos 2 (8):13-24.
    Este texto sistematiza e reorganiza uma comunicação apresentada em 06 de novembro de 2020 no evento online comemorativo dos 20 anos do Grupo Hume da UFMG, idealizado pela professora Lívia Guimarães, grande incentivadora dos estudos sobre a filosofia de David Hume no Brasil.
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  12. Aspectos literarios de la filosofía de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2021 - In Filosofía y literatura: estudios de caso, Chávez Tortolero, Mario (coord.). México: pp. 83-114.
    En este capítulo sostengo que la filosofía de Hume tiene elementos literarios y que dichos elementos no sólo ilustran o ejemplifican elementos filosóficos, sino que forman parte de la teoría misma; además, que la literatura es una parte integral de su concepción de la filosofía. Lo anterior nos permite justificar la tesis sobre los aspectos literarios de la filosofía de Hume y entender en qué sentido hay un continuo entre ambas. Primero, se ofrece una noción de literatura a partir de (...)
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  13. Death and Character: Further Reflections on Hume.Annette C. Baier - 2008 - Harvard University Press.
  14. Brentano and the Ideality of Time.Denis Seron - forthcoming - Revista de Filosofia Moderna E Contemporânea 9 (2).
    How is it possible to have present memory experiences of things that, being past, are no longer presently experienced? A possible answer to this long-standing philosophical question is what I call the “ideality of time view,” namely the view that temporal succession is unreal. In this paper I outline the basic idea behind Brentano’s version of the ideality of time view. Additionally, I contrast it with Hume’s version, suggesting that, despite significant differences, it can nonetheless be construed as broadly Humean.
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  15. Hume Against the Geometers.Dan Kervick -
    In the Treatise of Human Nature, David Hume mounts a spirited assault on the doctrine of the infinite divisibility of extension, and he defends in its place the contrary claim that extension is everywhere only finitely divisible. Despite this major departure from the more conventional conceptions of space embodied in traditional geometry, Hume does not endorse any radical reform of geometry. Instead Hume espouses a more conservative approach, claiming that geometry fails only “in this single point” – in its purported (...)
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  16. Hume’s Thoroughly Relationist Ontology of Time.Matias Slavov - 2021 - Metaphysica 22 (2):173-188.
    I argue that Hume’s philosophy of time is relationist in the following two senses. 1) Standard definition of relationism. Time is a succession of indivisible moments. Hence there is no time independent of change. Time is a relational, not substantial feature of the world. 2) Rigid relationism. There is no evidence of uniform natural standard for synchronization of clocks. No absolute temporal metric is available. There are countless times, and no time is privileged. Combining 1) and 2) shows that Hume’s (...)
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  17. Hume.Gerald Hanratty - 1978 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 26:292-293.
  18. Descartes and Hume on I-Thoughts.Luca Forgione - 2018 - Thémata: Revista de Filosofía 57:211-228.
    Self-consciousness can be understood as the ability to think I-thou-ghts which can be described as thoughts about oneself ‘as oneself’. Self-consciousness possesses two specific correlated features: the first regards the fact that it is grounded on a first-person perspective, whereas the second concerns the fact that it should be considered a consciousness of the self as subject rather than a consciousness of the self as object. The aim of this paper is to analyse a few considerations about Descartes and Hume’s (...)
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  19. David Hume’un Kozmolojik Argüman Eleştirisi.Soner Soysal - 2016 - Ethos: Dialogues in Philosophy and Social Sciences 9 (1):77-96.
    David Hume’un Doğal Din Üzerine Diyaloglar kitabı, başlığının da ima ettiği gibi, vahiy metinlerine başvurmadan Tanrı’nın varlığına ve niteliklerine ulaşılıp ulaşılamayacağını araştıran bir metindir. Metin boyunca, felsefe tarihinde de gördüğümüz, iki ana yaklaşımı temsil eden iki temel argüman sunulur. Bunlardan ilki, a priori yaklaşımı temsil eden kozmolojik argümandır. Diğeri ise, a posteriori yaklaşımı temsi eden zeki tasarım argümanıdır. Bu yazıda, Hume’un, diyalogdaki Philo karakteri üzerinden ortaya koyduğu, kozmolojik argümana yönelik eleştirileri ele alınıp, böyle bir argümanın neden Tanrı’nın varlığı ve nitelikleri (...)
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  20. Hume on External Existence: A Sceptical Predicament.Dominic K. Dimech - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Sydney
    This thesis investigates Hume’s philosophy of external existence in relation to, and within the context of, his philosophy of scepticism. In his two main works on metaphysics – A Treatise of Human Nature (1739–40) and the first Enquiry (first ed. 1748) – Hume encounters a predicament pertaining to the unreflective, ‘vulgar’ attribution of external existence to mental perceptions and the ‘philosophical’ distinction between perceptions and objects. I argue that we should understand this predicament as follows: the vulgar opinion is our (...)
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  21. Boolean Difference-Making: A Modern Regularity Theory of Causation.Michael Baumgartner & Christoph Falk - unknown - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axz047.
    A regularity theory of causation analyses type-level causation in terms of Boolean difference-making. The essential ingredient that helps this theoretical framework overcome the problems of Hume’s and Mill’s classical accounts is a principle of non-redundancy: only Boolean dependency structures from which no elements can be eliminated track causation. The first part of this paper argues that the recent regularity theoretic literature has not consistently implemented this principle, for it disregarded an important type of redundancies: structural redundancies. Moreover, it is shown (...)
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  22. The Second Analogy and the Kantian Answer to Hume: Why “Cause” has to Be an a Priori Concept.Andrea Faggion - 2012 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 24 (34):61.
    The main goal of Kant’s Second Analogy of Experience was to answer Humean objectionsconcerning the aprioricity of the principle of “every-event-some-cause”. This paper intendsto suggest an interpretation of the Kantian argument that, even though cannot show thatHume should be satisfied with the answer, makes clear Kant’s reasons for that anti-Humeangoal. In the first part of this paper, I intend to discuss summarily Hume’s objection againstthe possibility of a demonstration of the principle “every-event-some-cause” and his thesisconcerning its validity. In the second (...)
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  23. Theory of Substance in Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.Allan R. Bower - unknown
    B.A. Thesis --University of Illinois, 1895.
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  24. Solução de Aristóteles e David Hume aos Paradoxos de Zenão: um estudo sobre o conceito de espaço.Marcos César Seneda & Arthur Falco de Lima - 2017 - Horizonte Científico 11 (1):1-28.
    Este trabalho é uma investigação sobre os conceitos de espaço presentes tanto no livro IV da Física de Aristóteles, bem como no Livro 1, parte 2, do Tratado da Natureza Humana de David Hume. Nosso ponto de partida são os paradoxos de Zenão. Sabemos que Aristóteles debate diretamente com Zenão no livro IV da Física, enquanto Hume, no Tratado da Natureza Humana discute com a posição de Zenão acerca do espaço renovada por Bayle. Tendo isto em vista, o principal objetivo (...)
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  25. Kant, Hume and Causality.D. A. Rohatyn - 1975 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 6 (1):34-36.
    Kant's answer to Hume is seen to comprise the following: agreement with Hume that causal connection cannot be inferred from experience; moving beyond Hume in making causal conceptions presuppositions of experience ; distinguishing causality from other, more basic presuppositions of experience . Not only is causality a Verknuepfung, rather than a Bedingung, thereby relegating it to a lower level of generality, but its presence in the table of categories simply signifies the possibility of its application at any time, not the (...)
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  26. Donald W. Livingston, "Hume's Philosophy of Common Life". [REVIEW]David Fate Norton - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (2):300.
  27. Hume's Difficulty: Time and Identity in the Treatise.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2008 - New York: Routledge.
    In this volume--the first, focused study of Hume on time and identity--Baxter focuses on Hume’s treatment of the concept of numerical identity, which is central to Hume's famous discussions of the external world and personal identity. Hume raises a long unappreciated, and still unresolved, difficulty with the concept of identity: how to represent something as "a medium betwixt unity and number." Superficial resemblance to Frege’s famous puzzle has kept the difficulty in the shadows. Hume’s way of addressing it makes sense (...)
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  28. Hume Difficulty: Time and Identity in the Treatise.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 146 (3):435-443.
    In this volume--the first, focused study of Hume on time and identity--Baxter focuses on Hume’s treatment of the concept of numerical identity, which is central to Hume's famous discussions of the external world and personal identity. Hume raises a long unappreciated, and still unresolved, difficulty with the concept of identity: how to represent something as "a medium betwixt unity and number." Superficial resemblance to Frege’s famous puzzle has kept the difficulty in the shadows. Hume’s way of addressing it makes sense (...)
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  29. Humean Humility.Aisling Crean - 2010 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 13 (1):17-37.
    This paper sets up and then solves a puzzle for the sceptical realist interpretation of Hume. The puzzle takes off when the sceptical realist attributes to Hume the following metaphysical theses: Causal powers grounding necessary connections in nature exist. Causal powers grounding necessary connections in nature are what make things happen.It then attributes an epistemological thesis to him: We have no knowledge of causal powers in nature nor of the necessary connections in nature which these powers ground.But putting these three (...)
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  30. Some Misunderstandings of Hume.T. E. Jessop - 1952 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 6 (20):155-167.
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  31. Humeanism Without Humean Supervenience: A Projectivist Account of Laws and Possibilities.Barry Ward - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 107 (3):191-218.
    Acceptance of Humean Supervenience and the reductive Humean analyses that entail it leads to a litany of inadequately explained conflicts with our intuitions regarding laws and possibilities. However, the non-reductive Humeanism developed here, on which law claims are understood as normative rather than fact stating, can accommodate those intuitions. Rational constraints on such norms provide a set of consistency relations that ground a semantics formulated in terms of factual-normative worlds, solving the Frege-Geach problem of construing unasserted contexts. This set of (...)
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  32. 'Whatever has a beginning of existence must have a cause': Hume's argument exposed.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1974 - Analysis 34 (5):145.
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  33. Hume.Terence Penelhum - 1978 - Mind 87 (346):287-289.
  34. On the Compatibility Between Euclidean Geometry and Hume’s Denial of Infinite Divisibility.Emil Badici - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):231-244.
    It has been argued that Hume’s denial of infinite divisibility entails the falsity of most of the familiar theorems of Euclidean geometry, including the Pythagorean theorem and the bisection theorem. I argue that Hume’s thesis that there are indivisibles is not incompatible with the Pythagorean theorem and other central theorems of Euclidean geometry, but only with those theorems that deal with matters of minuteness. The key to understanding Hume’s view of geometry is the distinction he draws between a precise and (...)
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  35. Hume’s Theory of Causation: A Quasi-Realist Interpretation. [REVIEW]P. J. E. Kail - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):190-192.
  36. Hume’s Metaphysics and Its Present-Day Influence.Charles Hartshorne - 1961 - New Scholasticism 35 (2):152-171.
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  37. The Metaphysically Absurd in Hume.David Platt - 1979 - International Studies in Philosophy 11:153-156.
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  38. The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy, 1637-1739. [REVIEW]John M. Nicholas - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (4):824-825.
    Kenneth Clatterbaugh has written a valuable exposition and discussion of a century of upheaval in metaphysics and natural philosophy, tracing the gutting and reworking of Aristotelian causality from its uncomfortable scholastic context into a leaner and meaner instrument of secularized scientific explanation. The book examines key figures directly, evaluates prominent interpretations from the recent literature, and also puts Clatterbaugh’s own useful and definite stamp on the story. This includes the usual philosophical suspects—Descartes, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume—and their weighty philosophical interlocutors (...)
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  39. Hume’s Determinism.Peter Millican - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):611-642.
    David Hume has traditionally been assumed to be a soft determinist or compatibilist, at least in the ‘reconciling project’ that he presents in Section 8 of the first Enquiry, entitled ‘Of liberty and necessity.’ Indeed, in encyclopedias and textbooks of Philosophy he is standardly taken to be one of the paradigm compatibilists, rivalled in significance only by Hobbes within the tradition passed down through Locke, Mill, Schlick and Ayer to recent writers such as Dennett and Frankfurt. Many Hume scholars also (...)
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  40. Philosophy Hume's Philosophical Development. A Study of His Methods. By James Noxon. Oxford: Clarendon Press: Oxford University Press, 1973. Pp. Xiv + 197. £2.50. [REVIEW]P. M. Heimann - 1974 - British Journal for the History of Science 7 (3):287-287.
  41. Realism and Appearances: An Essay in Ontology.John W. Yolton - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book addresses one of the fundamental topics in philosophy: the relation between appearance and reality. John Yolton draws on a rich combination of historical and contemporary material, ranging from the early modern period to present-day debates, to examine this central philosophical preoccupation, which he presents in terms of distinctions between phenomena and causes, causes and meaning, and persons and man. He explores in detail how Locke, Berkeley and Hume talk of appearances and their relation to reality, and offers illuminating (...)
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  42. Hume on Causation.Helen Beebee - 2006 - Routledge.
    Hume is traditionally credited with inventing the ‘regularity theory’ of causation, according to which the causal relation between two events consists merely in the fact that events of the first kind are always followed by events of the second kind. Hume is also traditionally credited with two other, hugely influential positions: the view that the world appears to us as a world of unconnected events, and inductive scepticism: the view that the ‘problem of induction’, the problem of providing a justification (...)
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  43. Merleau-Ponty on Causality.Douglas Low - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (3):349-367.
    “Merleau-Ponty on Causality” attempts to reveal Merleau-Ponty’s treatment of causality with respect to the physical, the vital, and the human. The philosophy of causality of both Hume and Mill will be briefly addressed and challenged. Special attention will be paid to Merleau-Ponty’s treatment of causality with respect to human behavior.
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  44. David Hume : Self Identity.Walter Frank Browning - unknown
    In the 'Appendix' to the Treatise of Human Nature David Hume asserts that he has been unable to explain the principles which can adequately account for the unity and the identity of the self. There exists in Book I of the Treatise, a principle, which can in fact account for the unity and identity of the self. Hume utilizes the principle in his explication of our belief in the continued and independent existence of a material world. He did not, however, (...)
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  45. Hume on the Idea of a Vacuum.Lorne Falkenstein - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):131-168.
    Hume had two principal arguments for denying that we can have an idea of a vacuum, an argument from the non-entity of unqualified points and an argument from the impossibility of forming abstract ideas of manners of disposition. He also made two serious concessions to the opposed view that we can indeed form ideas of vacua, namely, that bodies that have nothing sensible disposed between them may permit the interposition of other bodies without any apparent motion or occlusion and that (...)
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  46. The Problem of the Self and Personal Identity in David Hume.James Carlton Morrison - 1962
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  47. Humean Supervenience.Stephan Leuenberger - 2001
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  48. Causation and Explanation.Stathis Psillos - 2002 - Routledge.
    What is the nature of causation? How is causation linked with explanation? And can there be an adequate theory of explanation? These questions and many others are addressed in this unified and rigorous examination of the philosophical problems surrounding causation, laws and explanation. Part 1 of this book explores Hume's views on causation, theories of singular causation, and counterfactual and mechanistic approaches. Part 2 considers the regularity view of laws and laws as relations among universals, as well as recent alternative (...)
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  49. From Spatial to Aesthetic Distance in the Eighteenth Century.John T. Ogden - 1974 - Journal of the History of Ideas 35 (1):63.
    Eighteenth-Century english scientists, Poets, And philosophers extended the meaning of 'distance' beyond a concept of space and time to include psychological and aesthetic meanings. Berkeley (1709), Priestley (1772), And thomas wedgwood (1818) showed that it was not a self-Evident idea but a complex intellectual construction. The poets denham (1655), Pope (1711), Dyer (1726), Collins (1747), Gray (1747), Campbell (1799) and wordsworth (1805-1827) used distance to represent a mental perspective, An aesthetic attitude, Nostalgia, Hope, Fancy, And imagination. Hume (1739), Hartley (1749), (...)
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  50. Causation, Quasi-Realism, and David Hume.Angela Michelle Coventry - 2004 - Dissertation, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Despite the widely recognized importance of Hume's theory of causation, there is no agreement amongst commentators about the upshot of that theory. Causal realists interpret Hume as believing that causal statements are true or false due to the existence in the universe of a power linking causes to effects, while causal anti-realists read him as denying that the existence of powers makes causal statements true or false, and as holding instead either that causal statements can be reduced to statements about (...)
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