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  1. Hume's Separability Principle, his Dictum, and their Implications.Graham Clay - forthcoming - Mind.
    Hsueh M. Qu has recently argued that Hume's famed "Separability Principle" from the Treatise entangles him in a contradiction. Qu offers a modified principle as a solution but also argues that the mature Hume would not have needed to avail himself of it, given that Hume's arguments in the first Enquiry do not depend on this principle in any form. To the contrary, I show that arguments in the first Enquiry depend on this principle, but I agree with Qu that (...)
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  2. Is Hume a Perspectivalist?Sam Zahn - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Hume notoriously pursues a constructive science of human nature in the Treatise while raising serious skeptical doubts about that project and leaving them apparently unanswered. On the perspectivalist reading, Hume endorses multiple incommensurable epistemic perspectives in the Treatise. This reading faces two significant objections: that it renders Hume’s epistemology inconsistent (or at least highly incoherent) and that it is ad hoc. In this paper, I propose a perspectivalist account of epistemic justification in the Treatise that addresses, to a significant degree, (...)
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  3. Consciousness, Time, and Scepticism in Hume's Thought.Lorne Falkenstein - 2024 - New York: Routledge.
    David Hume’s philosophical work presents the reader with a perplexing mix of constructive accounts of empirically guided belief and destructive sceptical arguments against all belief. This book reconciles this conflict by showing that Hume intended his scepticism to be remedial. It immunizes us against the influence of “unphilosophical” causes of belief, determining us to proportion our beliefs to the evidence. In making this case, this book develops Humean positions on topics Hume did not discuss in detail but that are of (...)
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  4. Hume’s Empiricist Metaphysics.Donald L. M. Baxter - 2023 - Quaestio: Yearbook of the History of Metaphysics 22:261-279.
    Hume’s empiricist reason for rejecting “school metaphysics” makes it natural to assume that Hume rejects all metaphysics. A.J. Ayer certainly reads Hume this way. The natural assumption is wrong, however. Hume only rejects the aprioricity of metaphysics, and not the science itself. I will argue that his empirical science of human nature supports three basic metaphysical principles. (1) The Contradiction Principle: The clearly conceivable implies no contradiction. (2) The Conceivability Principle: The clearly conceivable is possible. (3) The Conceptual Separability Principle: (...)
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  5. Hume on Theoretical Simplicity.Hsueh Qu - 2023 - Philosophers' Imprint 23 (1).
    Hume often praises and appeals to the theoretical virtue of simplicity in his philosophy. Yet there has been relatively little scholarship done on Hume’s conception of theoretical simplicity. This paper will look to rectify this lacuna in the literature. In particular, it will look to answer three questions as they relate to Hume’s philosophy. First, what is theoretical simplicity? Second, why should we favour simpler theories over more complex ones? Third, can a theory be too simple, and if so, how?The (...)
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  6. Una hipótesis sobre la hipótesis en Hume: el papel de la intuición.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2022 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 48 (1):51-68.
    En este artículo se sostiene la siguiente hipótesis: si una hipótesis tiene valor epistémico para Hume, este valor tiene que provenir de la intuición. Para ello se consideran las tres posibles fuentes de conocimiento en su pensamiento: la demostración, la experiencia y la intuición. Considerando que Hume presenta su doctrina de la creencia como una hipótesis, se argumenta que el valor epistémico de las hipótesis no puede provenir de la demostración ni de la experiencia y, por tanto, o las hipótesis (...)
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  7. Response to My Critics (The Sydney Sessions).Stefanie Rocknak - 2022 - Hume Studies 45 (1):77-93.
    Response to Don Baxter, Don Garrett and Jennifer Marusic regarding my book Imagined Causes: Hume's Conception of Objects; initially delivered at the 2016 Hume Conference in Sydney, Australia as part of the Author Meets Critics session.
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  8. Faint Impressions, Forceful Ideas: Hume's Impression/Idea Distinction.Alexander P. Bozzo - 2021 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 24 (2):326-350.
    A natural reading of Hume’s distinction between impressions and ideas is that impressions are forceful perceptions whereas ideas are faint. A problem emerges, however, when Hume countenances the possibility of faint impressions and forceful ideas. In this paper, I attempt a resolution to the problem. I argue that Hume characterizes impressions and ideas intensionally and extensionally, and sometimes uses the term in only one of the two senses. I argue that Hume intensionally defines impressions and ideas as forceful perceptions and (...)
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  9. Regularity and certainty in Hume’s treatise: a Humean response to Husserl.Stefanie Rocknak - 2020 - Synthese 199 (1-2):579-600.
    According to Husserl, Hume’s empirical method was deeply flawed—like all empiricists, Hume did not, and could not adequately justify his method, much less his findings. Instead, Hume gives us a “circular” and “irrational” “psychological explanation” of “mediate judgments of fact,” i.e. of inductive inferences. Yet Husserl was certain that he could justify both his own method and his own findings with an appeal to the phenomenological, pre-theoretical, pre-naturalistic “epoché”. However, whether or not Husserl’s notion of an epoché is justified, or (...)
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  10. Hume's Legacy: A Cognitive Science Perspective.Mark Collier - 2018 - In Angela Coventry & Alex Sager (eds.), The Humean Mind. Routledge. pp. 434-445.
    Hume is an experimental philosopher who attempts to understand why we think, feel, and act as we do. But how should we evaluate the adequacy of his proposals? This chapter examines Hume’s account from the perspective of interdisciplinary work in cognitive science.
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  11. Perceiving Necessity.Catherine Legg & James Franklin - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (3).
    In many diagrams one seems to perceive necessity – one sees not only that something is so, but that it must be so. That conflicts with a certain empiricism largely taken for granted in contemporary philosophy, which believes perception is not capable of such feats. The reason for this belief is often thought well-summarized in Hume's maxim: ‘there are no necessary connections between distinct existences’. It is also thought that even if there were such necessities, perception is too passive or (...)
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  12. A Puzzle about Fictions in the Treatise.Jonathan Cottrell - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):47-73.
    in the treatise, hume claims to identify many “fictions of the imagination” among both “vulgar” and philosophical beliefs. To name just a few, these include the fiction of one aggregate composed of many parts,1 the fiction of a material object’s identity through change, and the fiction of a human mind’s identity through change and interruption in its existence. Hume claims that these fictions and others like them are somehow defective: in his words, they are “improper,” “inexact,” or not “strict”. I (...)
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  13. Realismo ontológico e antirrealismo epistemológico na problema do mundo externo em Hume.Leandro Hollanda - 2016 - In Jaimir Conte, Marília Cortês de Ferraz & Flávio Zimmermann (eds.), Ensaios sobre a filosofia de Hume. Santa Catarina: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC). pp. 403-432.
    No Tratado da natureza humana, David Hume dedica uma longa seção à problemática sobre a possibilidade da existência do mundo externo intitulada “Do ceticismo quanto aos sentidos”. A seção traz idas e vindas do autor no que diz respeito à resposta para o problema. Inicialmente, Hume dá como certa a existência externa dos corpos, i.e., independente das percepções, e avisa que sua investigação se limitará, apenas, às causas que levam a crer nisso. Sua pretensão inicial não é cumprida e logo (...)
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  14. Da imaterialidade da alma: a desconstrução mais incisiva de Hume de um pressuposto metafísico.Marcos Seneda - 2016 - Ensaios Sobre a Filosofia de Hume.
    Da imaterialidade da alma: a desconstrução mais incisiva de Hume de um pressuposto metafísico .
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  15. Empiricism and Relationism Intertwined: Hume and Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity.Matias Slavov - 2016 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 31 (2):247-263.
    Einstein acknowledged that his reading of Hume influenced the development of his special theory of relativity. In this article, I juxtapose Hume’s philosophy with Einstein’s philosophical analysis related to his special relativity. I argue that there are two common points to be found in their writings, namely an empiricist theory of ideas and concepts, and a relationist ontology regarding space and time. The main thesis of this article is that these two points are intertwined in Hume and Einstein.
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  16. Sobre la imaginación y la fantasía en el pensamiento de Hume.Mario Edmundo Chávez Tortolero - 2016 - In Tortolero Mario Edmundo Chávez (ed.), Imaginación y conocimiento. De Descartes a Freud. Corinter/Gedisa. pp. 51-62.
  17. Reason, Induction, and the Humean Objection to Kant.Kevin R. Busch - 2015 - Kant Yearbook 7 (1):23-45.
    While Kant does not address the problem of induction often attributed to Hume, he does, by way of a transcendental deduction of an a priori principle of reflecting empirical judgment, address a distinct problem Hume raises indirectly. This problem is that induction cannot be justified so long as it presupposes some empirical concept applying to or some empirical principle true of more than one object in nature, a presupposition neither determined by nor founded on reason. I draw on Hume’s positive (...)
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  18. Frederick Schmitt, Hume's Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. 448 pp. £55.00 hb. ISBN 9780199683116. [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (2):152-158.
    In this book, Schmitt claims that Hume, however implicitly, employs a fully-developed epistemology in the Treatise. In particular, Hume employs a “veritistic” epistemology, i.e. one that is grounded in truth, particularly, true beliefs. In some cases, these true beliefs are “certain,” are “infallible” (78) and are justified, as in the case of knowledge, i.e. demonstrations. In other cases, we acquire these beliefs through a reliable method, i.e. when they are produced by causal proofs. Such beliefs are also “certain” (69, 81) (...)
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  19. Hume on the Lockean Metaphysics of Secondary Qualities.Jason R. Fisette - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):95-136.
    Hume is widely read as committed to a kind of anti-realism about secondary qualities, on which secondary qualities are less real than primary qualities. I argue that Hume is not an anti-realist about secondary qualities as such, and I explain why Hume’s remarks on the primary-secondary distinction are better read as abstaining from the realist/anti-realist debate as it was understood by modern philosophers such as Locke. By contextualizing Hume’s discussion of the primary-secondary distinction in Treatise 1.4.4 as a response to (...)
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  20. Curious Virtues in Hume's Epistemology.Karl Schafer - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14:1-20.
    Discusses Hume's considered view of what "good" belief-formation consists in. In doing so, attributes to Hume a sentimentalist picture of epistemic virtue in which the passion of curiosity plays a foundational role.
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  21. Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation and Hume's Conception of Causality.Matias Slavov - 2013 - Philosophia Naturalis 50 (2):277-305.
    This article investigates the relationship between Hume’s causal philosophy and Newton ’s philosophy of nature. I claim that Newton ’s experimentalist methodology in gravity research is an important background for understanding Hume’s conception of causality: Hume sees the relation of cause and effect as not being founded on a priori reasoning, similar to the way that Newton criticized non - empirical hypotheses about the properties of gravity. However, according to Hume’s criteria of causal inference, the law of universal gravitation is (...)
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  22. Hume’s Empiricist Inner Epistemology: A Reassessment of The Copy Principle.Angela Coventry & Tom Seppalainen - 2012 - In Alan Bailey & Dan O'Brien (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Hume. Continuum. pp. 38--56.
    Vivacity, the “liveliness” of perceptions, is central to Hume’s epistemology. Hume equated belief with vivid ideas. Vivacity is a conscious quality so believable ideas are felt to be lively. Hume’s empiricism revolves around a phenomenological, inner epistemology. Through copying, Hume bases vivacity in impressions. Sensory vivacity also concerns liveliness or patterns of change. Through learnt skillful use, it tracks change specific to intentional sense-perceptual experience, Hume’s “coherent and constant” complex impressions. Copying, in turn, communicates the conscious skill of vivacity to (...)
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  23. Hume and Reid on Newtonianism, Naturalism and Liberty.Chris Lindsay - 2012 - In Ilya Kasavin (ed.), David Hume and Contemporary Philosophy. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 191-208.
    There has been a recent flurry of work comparing and contrasting the respective methodologies of David Hume and his contemporary Thomas Reid. Both writers are explicit in their commitments to a Newtonian methodology. Yet they diverge radically on the issue of human liberty. In this paper I want to unpack the methodological commitments underlying the two different accounts of liberty. How is it that two avowed Newtonians end up diametrically opposed to one another with respect to such a fundamental aspect (...)
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  24. Reid's response to Hume's perceptual relativity argument.Lorne Falkenstein - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1):25-49.
    Reid declared Hume's appeal to variation in the magnitude of a table with distance to be the best argument that had ever been offered for the ‘ideal hypothesis’ that we experience nothing but our own mental states. Reid's principal objection to this argument fails to apply to minimally visible points. He did establish that we have reason to take our perceptions to be caused by external objects. But his case that we directly perceive external objects is undermined by what Hume (...)
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  25. Naturalism and common sense.Penelope Maddy - 2011 - Analytic Philosophy 52 (1):2-34.
    My topic here is metaphilosophy, the question of how philosophy is properly done. For some years now, I've been developing a particularly austere, roughly naturalistic approach to philosophical questions that I call 'second philosophy'. It has seemed to me that one effective way to convey the spirit of second philosophy is to compare and contrast it with other more familiar methods, like transcendental or therapeutic philosophy. Here I hope to pursue this sort of engagement with two other venerable schools of (...)
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  26. Hume's negative argument concerning induction.Stefanie Rocknak - 2011 - In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Where does the necessity that seems to accompany causal inferences come from? “Why [do] we conclude that … particular causes must necessarily have such particular effects?” In 1.3.6 of the Treatise, Hume entertains the possibility that this necessity is a function of reason. However, he eventually dismisses this possibility, where this dismissal consists of Hume’s “negative” argument concerning induction. This argument has received, and continues to receive, a tremendous amount of attention. How could causal inferences be justified if they are (...)
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  27. A natureza da filosofia de Hume.Jaimir Conte - 2010 - Princípios 17 (28):211-236.
    Meu objetivo neste artigo é destacar algumas das ideias centrais defendidas por Hume e, a fim de caracterizar a natureza de sua filosofia, contrapor duas interpretações frequentes de sua obra: a interpretação cética e interpretação naturalista. A fim de apontar as principais razões que estão por trás dessas duas interpretações que tentam apreender a natureza da filosofia de Hume, procuro abordar inicialmente alguns dos princípios centrais da teoria humeana e, em seguida, especialmente sua análise das inferências causais. No final, argumento (...)
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  28. Ideen. Repräsentationalismus in der Frühen Neuzeit.Dominik Perler & Johannes Haag - 2010 - Berlin & New York: W. De Gruyter.
    The notion of idea is a key concept in early modern philosophy. From Descartes seminal works at the beginning of the 17th century to the work of Thomas Reid in the closing years of the 18th century, discussion in theoretical philosophy is dominated by the debate about the core concept of idea. This two-volume textbook introduces eleven key authors from this period. The first volume presents the central texts in modern translation, often new translations based on the source texts. The (...)
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  29. Hume e a Epistemologia, de João Paulo Monteiro.Marília Côrtes de Ferraz - 2009 - Princípios 16 (25):283-294.
    Resenha do livro de MONTEIRO, Joáo Paulo. Hume e a Epistemologia ; revisáo de Frederico Diehl [1ª. ed. brasileira]. – Sáo Paulo: Editora UNESP; Discurso Editorial, 2009. (232 p).
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  30. Empiricism, Time-Awareness, and Hume's Manners of Disposition.Adrian Bardon - 2007 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 5 (1):47-63.
    The issue of time-awareness presents a critical challenge for empiricism: if temporal properties are not directly perceived, how do we become aware of them? A unique empiricist account of time-awareness suggested by Hume's comments on time in the Treatise avoids the problems characteristic of other empiricist accounts. Hume's theory, however, has some counter-intuitive consequences. The failure of empiricists to come up with a defensible theory of time-awareness lends prima facie support to a non-empiricist theory of ideas.
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  31. A Survey of British Epistemology.Ray Scott Percival - 2006 - In Anthony Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.), Continuum Encyclopaedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum. pp. 999-1007.
  32. Hume's Attack on Human Rationality.Idan Shimony - 2005 - Dissertation, Tel Aviv University
  33. Human Nature and Historical Knowledge: Hume, Hegel, and Vico. [REVIEW]S. K. Wertz - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):412-415.
    This book, now available in paperback, was not reviewed in this journal when it first appeared, but that omission is corrected here. Since its first appearance, the book has established itself as an important contribution to the philosophy of history and Hume’s place in it. Because of the scope of this journal, I shall mainly focus on Professor Pompa’s discussion of Hume, but the three thinkers—Hume, Hegel, and Vico—are a nice contrast. In his concluding chapter 4, Pompa sums up this (...)
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  34. Human Nature and Historical Knowledge. [REVIEW]Spencer K. Wertz - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (2):412-415.
    This book, now available in paperback, was not reviewed in this journal when it first appeared, but that omission is corrected here. Since its first appearance, the book has established itself as an important contribution to the philosophy of history and Hume’s place in it. Because of the scope of this journal, I shall mainly focus on Professor Pompa’s discussion of Hume, but the three thinkers—Hume, Hegel, and Vico—are a nice contrast. In his concluding chapter 4, Pompa sums up this (...)
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  35. Hume’s Reason. [REVIEW]Tom L. Beauchamp - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (4):572-575.
    Hume is widely regarded as an antirationalist and skeptic about reason. Yet he often appeals to reason. He also treats “understanding” and “reason” as virtually synonymous and ascribes seemingly cognitive functions to the imagination and the passions—functions that he elsewhere attributes to reason. What, then, is reason and how is it connected to reasoning in Hume's philosophy?
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  36. Owen, David. Hume's Reason. [REVIEW]Nicholas Capaldi - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (3):669-670.
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  37. Hume on Knowledge.Antony Flew - 2001 - International Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):110-111.
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  38. Kant's answer to Hume: How Kant should have tried to stand Hume's copy thesis on its head.Steven M. Bayne - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):207 – 224.
  39. Les Lumières Écossaises et le roman philosophique de Descartes.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2000 - In Yaron Senderowicz, Yves Wahl, Daniel Garber, Frédéric Cossutta, Georges-Elia Sarfati, Sergio Cremaschi, Anthony Kenny, Elhanan Yakira, Abraham Mansbach, Fernando Gil, Ruth Weintraub, Zauderer Naaman Noa, Keenan Hagi & Viala Alain (eds.), Descartes: Reception and Disenchantment. Réception et Déception. Edited by: Yaron Senderowicz & Yves Wahl. Tel Aviv: University Publishing Projects. pp. 65-88.
    The paper reconstructs the reception of Descartes's work by the Scottish Enlighteners, from Colin MacLaurin to Dugald Stewart. The Scots' image of Descartes was a byproduct of a scientific controversy; philosophical arguments were brought into the picture more as asides than as a primary focus of interest. As soon as the Cartesian physics withered away as a real alternative to Newtonian physics, only the philosophical arguments were left, with no memory of the context out of which they originated, and the (...)
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  40. The Synthetic Relation in Hume.Stefanie Rocknak - 1999 - The Dialectic of the Universal and the Particular, Ed. By Jonathan Hanen, Institüt Für Die Wissenshaften Vom Menschen; Junior Fellows Conferences, 4:121-165.
    Here we will see that contrary to the party line, Hume’s notion of a relation should be understood, in all cases, as a peculiar non-necessary synthetic relation; unique, but similar in a certain constructive sense to what I characterize as a mathematical notion of synthesis. And, most controversially, I argue that this non-necessary synthetic notion of a relation includes Hume’s arithmetical relations, which have typically been interpreted as either “analytic,” necessary, or both. In this general respect, Hume anticipates Quine’s attack (...)
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  41. Goût et connaissance chez David Hume.D. Berlioz - 1997 - Archives de Philosophie 60 (4):575-595.
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  42. Hume’s Scepticism with Regard to Reason: A Reconsideration.Francis W. Dauer - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (2):211-229.
  43. Hume and the Limits of Reason.Michael P. Lynch - 1996 - Hume Studies 22 (1):89-104.
    The purpose of this paper is to explain Hume's account of the way both the scope and the degree of benevolent motivation is limited. I argue that Hume consistently affirms, both in the _Treatise<D> and in the second _Enquiry<D>, (i) that the scope of benevolent motivation is very broad, such that it includes any creature that is conscious and capable of thought, and (ii) that the degree of benevolent motivation is limited, such that a person is naturally inclined to feel (...)
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  44. L'illuminismo scozzese e il newtonianismo morale.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1992 - In Marco Geuna & Maria Luisa Pesante (eds.), Passioni, Interessi, Convenzioni Discussioni settecentesche su vrtù e civiltà. Milano: Franco Angeli. pp. 41-76.
    The paper describes how a simple idea, that of a new foundation of moral philosophy taking Galilean new natural philosophy as a mode , lead to unforeseen developments once the competition between a Cartesian and a Newtonian paradigm emerged. Those developments are reconstructed in Hume, Smith, Ferguson.
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  45. Human Nature and Historical Knowledge. Hume, Hegel and Vico.G. H. R. Parkinson - 1992 - Philosophical Books 33 (1):13-14.
  46. Hume and Belief in the Existence of an External World.Michael J. Costa - 1988 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 32:99-112.
  47. Husserl's Criticisms of Hume's Theory of Knowledge.Robert E. Butts - 1957 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
  48. Hume’s Theory of Knowledge. [REVIEW]Vernon J. Bourke - 1938 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 13 (4):693-694.
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  49. David Hume's Lehre von der Erkenntnis.F. Jodl - 1871 - Halle.
    Anmerk. g.) „als (in den genannten Wissenschaften) zwischen Vernunft und Erfahrung zu unterscheiden und beide Erkenntnissarten ganz auseinander zu halten . . . .. Fasst man aber die Erkenntnisse, welche als Produkte des reinen Denkens ...
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