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  1. Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.David Hume - forthcoming - Audio CD.
    Long before the current dispute in the USA about the teaching of evolution, Hume's dialogues presented and critically analyzed the idea of intelligent design. What should we teach our children about the creation of the world? What should we teach them about religion? The characters Demea, Cleanthes, and Philo passionately present and defend different answers to that question. Demea opens the dialogue with a position derived from René Descartes and Father Malebranche — God's nature is a mystery, but God's existence (...)
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  2. Hume's Social Epistemology and the Dialogue Form.Daryl Ooi - forthcoming - Episteme:1-16.
    Hume begins his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion by providing a discussion on what an ideal dialogue ought to look like. Many considerations that Hume raises coincide with similar concerns in contemporary social epistemology. This paper examines three aspects of Hume’s social epistemology: epistemic peerhood, inquiry norms and the possibility of rational persuasion. Interestingly, however, I will argue that the conversation between Philo, Cleanthes and Demea falls short of meeting Hume’s articulated standard of what an ideal dialogue ought to look like. (...)
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  3. Kant's Response to Hume on Natural Theology: Dogmatic Anthropomorphism, Analogical Inference, and Symbolic Representation.Pavel Reichl - 2023 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 61 (1):77-101.
    Abstractabstract:This article examines Kant's response to the criticisms of natural theology that Hume articulates in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Though Kant was in agreement with the Dialogues' rejection of dogmatic theism, he equally viewed many of its arguments as a threat to his aim of constructing a critical theology. Kant is often taken to have successfully diffused this skeptical threat on the basis of a symbolic anthropomorphism articulated in the Prolegomena. However, I argue that the Prolegomena account remains susceptible (...)
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  4. Skepticism in Hume's Dialogues.Hsueh Qu - 2022 - Hume Studies 47 (1):9-38.
  5. Who speaks for Hume: Hume’s presence in the Dialogues concerning natural religion.Aleksandra Davidović - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):113-137.
    One of the reasons for many different and even opposing interpretations of Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is the absence of consensus concerning the question of which character in the Dialogues represents Hume. In this paper I argue that taking Philo to be his primary spokesperson provides us with the most consistent reading of the whole work and helps us better understand Hume’s religious viewpoint. I first stress the specific dialogue form of Hume’s work, which requires us to take into (...)
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  6. Who speaks for Hume: Hume's presence in the 'Dialogues concerning Natural religion'.Aleksandra Davidović - 2021 - Belgrade Philosophical Annual 1 (34):113-137.
    One of the reasons for many different and even opposing interpretations of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion is the absence of consensus concerning the question of which character in the Dialogues represents Hume. In this paper I argue that taking Philo to be his primary spokesperson provides us with the most consistent reading of the whole work and helps us better understand Hume's religious viewpoint. I first stress the specific dialogue form of Hume's work, which requires us to take into (...)
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  7. Empiricism or Its Dialectical Destruction?Gene Fendt - 2021 - International Philosophical Quarterly 61 (2):139-160.
    Pamphilus’ introductory letter opens contradictory ways of reading Hume’s Dialogues. The first, suggested by Pamphilus' claim to be “mere auditor” to the dialogues, which were “deeply imprinted in [his] memory,” is the empiricist reading. This traditional reading could, and has, gone several ways, including to such conclusions as Philo forces upon Cleanthes, shocking Demea; e.g., that the design of the mosquito and other “curious artifices of nature,” which inflict pain and suffering on all, bespeaks an utterly careless and insensate, if (...)
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  8. Proving Cleanthes wrong.Laureano Luna - 2021 - Journal of Applied Logic 8 (3):707-736.
    Hume’s famous character Cleanthes claims that there is no difficulty in explaining the existence of causal chains with no first cause since in them each item is causally explained by its predecessor. Relying on logico-mathematical resources, we argue for two theses: (1) if the existence of Cleanthes’ chain can be explained at all, it must be explained by the fact that the causal law ruling it is in force, and (2) the fact that such a causal law is in force (...)
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  9. David Hume and Intelligent Design: A Counter Criticism.Benjamin Martin - 2021 - Quaerens Deum: The Liberty Undergraduate Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (1).
    David Hume, the celebrated Scottish philosopher of the 18th century, wrote a work entitled Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, in which he provides a detailed criticism of several theistic arguments. In the Dialogues there are found 3 interlocutors, each of whom approaches natural religion from a different philosophical standpoint. Cleanthes is the character upon whose argumentation we will mainly focus, as he is the defender of the a posteriori argument from Intelligent Design. Philo, another interlocutor, is a philosophical skeptic who opposes (...)
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  10. Hume's Skepticism and the Problem of Atheism.Paul Russell - 2021 - In Reacsting Hume and Early Modern Philosophy: Selected Essays. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 303-339.
    David Hume was clearly a critic of religion. It is still debated, however, whether or not he was an atheist who denied the existence of God. According to some interpretations he was a theist of some kind and others claim he was an agnostic who simply suspends any belief on this issue. This essay argues that Hume’s theory of belief tells against any theistic interpretation – including the weaker, “attenuated” accounts. It then turns to the case for the view that (...)
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  11. Hume's Pious Theist: Pamphilus.James Tarrant - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):95-113.
    Pamphilus's neglected role of narrator in Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion (1779), with its twin themes of piety and world origination, is vital in appreciating the significance of the work. Pamphilus illustrates the stultifying effects of the early inculcation of piety on the creative arguments of natural religion and mirrors the contemporary institutional opposition to Hume. The DNR is not simply a brilliant dissection of divine authorship of morality and creation; it is a model of impiety. Philo's brilliant attack on (...)
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  12. Piety without Metaphysics: The Moral Pedagogy of Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.Joshua P. Hochschild - 2020 - Urbaniana University Journal 73 (3):73-99.
    Urbaniana University Journal 73.3 (2020): 73-99. -/- A close reading of Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion reveals that it is not what it appears. Rather than a work of natural theology, meant to show something about arguments concerning the existence and nature of God, the Dialogues turn out to embody a moral pedagogy exemplifying and attempting to instill a conception of piety and religion as virtues. This paper defends this interpretation by reviewing three alternative, but ultimately inadequate, interpretations of the (...)
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  13. Beyond Hume: Demea a rehabilitation with systematic intent.Hartmut von Sass - 2019 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 86 (1):61-84.
    Traditionally, Demea is considered to be the weakest character in Hume’s famous Dialogues concerning Natural Religion; the stage is completely dominated by Cleanthes’ optimistic theism and by Philo’s skeptical critical manoeuvres against that. Contrary to this traditional approach, however, the ‘orthodox’ Demea will be defended here by maintaining that Demea contributes—though neither consciously intended nor recognized by Hume—the most interesting observations concerning religious belief. He points to a position lying beyond the metaphysical fantasies of theism on the one hand and (...)
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  14. An introduction to the "Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion" of David Hume.Bruce McEwen - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    In professing to call attention to this often forgotten work of the great Scottish Philosopher one can- not help noticing how very similar the reception accorded to it by the outside world has been to its treatment at the hands of the author himself. During his lifetime he kept it in the safe obscurity of his study drawer, where it lay until the day of his death. The plan of the Dialogues had been clearly thought out by Hume as early (...)
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  15. Hume’s Critique of Religion: Sick Men’s Dreams, by A. Bailey & D. O'Brien. [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (273):867-70.
    Hume’s Critique of Religion is a valuable and rewarding contribution to Hume scholarship. The atheistic interpretation that the authors defend is well supported and convincingly argued. Although Gaskin’s Hume’s Philosophy of Religion is (rightly) highly regarded, I believe that Bailey and O’Brien provide a more compelling and convincing interpretation. Their account is, in particular, much stronger in respect of the historical background and contextual considerations that they draw on to support of their interpretation. These historical advances are achieved without weakening (...)
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  16. Hume’s Presence in the ‘Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion’, written by Robert J. Fogelin.Mark G. Spencer - 2018 - International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 8 (3):245-249.
  17. David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.John Donaldson & Ian Jackson - 2017 - In Macat Library. Routledge.
    An introduction for the general reader to David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.
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  18. Hume's Presence in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.J. Fogelin Robert - 2017 - New York, NY: Oup Usa.
    This book is primarily a textual analysis that demonstrates the close relationship of David Hume's The Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion with David Hume's central philosophical writings and its centrality to his relationship with scepticism.
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  19. Hume on Church Establishments, Secular Politics and History.Aaron Szymkowiak - 2017 - Diametros 54:95-117.
    In the third volume of the History of England, David Hume considers the political ramifications of the Protestant reformation with a “Digression concerning the ecclesiastical state.” He advocates the establishment of a state church, believing it will dampen religious “enthusiasm” in the polity. Unlike later secularization theorists, Hume assumes an intractable basis for religion in the human passions. Tensions in Hume’s “cooptation” strategy are evident from Adam Smith’s famous attack upon it in section five of The Wealth of Nations, and (...)
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  20. Diálogos sobre a religião natural: inclui seleção de cartas de Hume feitas à época de sua revisão da obra, além de fragmentos inéditos em português.David Hume - 2016 - Salvador, Bahia: EDUFBA. Edited by Bruna Frascolla & David Hume.
    Diálogos sobre a religião natural -- Cartas selecionadas.
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  21. Illuminismo, scienza newtoniana e religione nei dialoghi sulla religione naturale di hume.Gregorio Baldin - 2015 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 70 (3):645-646.
  22. Providential Naturalism and Miracles: John Fearn's Critique of Scottish Philosophy.Giovanni B. Grandi - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (1):75-94.
    According to Thomas Reid, the development of natural sciences following the model of Newton's Principia and Optics would provide further evidence for the belief in a provident God. This project was still supported by his student, Dugald Stewart, in the early nineteenth century. John Fearn , an early critic of the Scottish common sense school, thought that the rise of ‘infidelity’ in the wake of scientific progress had shown that the apologetic project of Reid and Stewart had failed. In reaction (...)
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  23. Dialoge über natürliche Religion.David Hume - 2015 - Hamburg: Felix Meiner Verlag. Edited by Lothar Kreimendahl.
    In seinem letzten philosophischen Werk erörtert Hume die Frage, ob es die Möglichkeit oder Notwendigkeit gibt, aus Vernunftgründen die Existenz Gottes zu bejahen. Die 1779 postum veröffentlichte Schrift führt die konträren Standpunkte vor.
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  24. O „teizmie empirycznym” w Dialogach o religii naturalnej Dawida Hume’a.Przemysław Spryszak - 2015 - Studia Z Historii Filozofii 6 (2):59-82.
    W niniejszej pracy staram się osłabić gruntowną krytykę Dawida Hume’a dotyczącą „teizmu empirycznego” : a) odróżniam „realizm empiryczny”, który przypisuję Kleantesowi, od „idealizmu empirycznego”, koncepcji, co istotne, nie stwarzającej dodatkowych trudności teoretycznych, oraz b) wykazuję, że jeżeli przez „teizm empiryczny” rozumieć się będzie także to drugie stanowisko, ów teizm okaże się w istocie niepodatny na część zarzutów wysuniętych przez Hume’a.
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  25. Dialoghi sulla religione naturale by David Hume (review). [REVIEW]Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):137-139.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:Dialoghi sulla religione naturale by David HumeVicente Sanfélix VidarteDavid Hume. Dialoghi sulla religione naturale. Edited by Gianni Paganini. Milano: Biblioteca Universale Rizzoli Classici, 2013. Pp. 430. ISBN 978-88-17-05496-6, Paperback, 12€.Not as well-known overseas as it should be, there is an important and active Italian tradition of Hume scholarship. One of its most recent and more important representatives is Professor Gianni Paganini, translator into Italian and editor of Norman (...)
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  26. Dialoghi sulla religione naturale by David Hume.Vicente Sanfélix Vidarte - 2014 - Hume Studies 40 (1):137-139.
    Not as well-known overseas as it should be, there is an important and active Italian tradition of Hume scholarship. One of its most recent and more important representatives is Professor Gianni Paganini, translator into Italian and editor of Norman Kemp Smith’s already excellent edition of the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. As is well known, it was a posthumous work by the Scottish philosopher and one of his works that raises the most difficulties for his interpreters. Paganini’s edition consists of a (...)
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  27. Hume’s Uses of Dialogue.Samuel Clark - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (1):61-76.
    What does David Hume do with the dialogue form in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion? I pursue this question in the context of a partial taxonomy of uses for the dialogue form in philosophy in general—although I want to emphasize the word “partial.” My driving concern here is Hume’s use of dialogue, not to list all possible uses of dialogue or to draw conclusions about the uses of dialogue in philosophy in general. My question sits between two other related questions: a (...)
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  28. Retórica anticética nos Diálogos sobre a religião natural de Hume/Anti-Sceptical Rhetoric in Hume's Dialogues concerning natural Religion.Lívia Guimarães - 2013 - Natureza Humana 15 (2).
    Neste ensaio, parto da pergunta acerca da motivação original dos Diálogos sobre a religião natural de Hume : de onde a propensão para o argumento pelo desígnio obtém força suficiente para prevalecer sobre a propensão natural a se acreditar nos sentidos e na experiência? Em minha hipótese, os Diálogos, não obstante seu título, representam uma falha na compreensão mútua. Enfocando o drama da peça, pretendo mostrar que, em Cleantes, eles expõem um viés prosélito no teísmo moderno; mais especificamente, que apontam (...)
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  29. Aquinas and the cry of Rachel: Thomistic reflections on the problem of evil.John F. X. Knasas - 2013 - Washington, D.C.: The Catholic University of America Press.
    Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 The Cry of Rachel -- Maritain's 1942 Marquette Aquinas Lecture -- Maritain's The Person and the Common Good -- Camus's The Plague -- ch. 2 Joy -- Being as the Good and the Eruption of Willing -- Being and Philosophical Psychology -- An Ordinary Knowledge of God and Metaphysics -- Metaphysics as Implicit Knowledge -- Being and the Intellectual Emotions -- ch. 3 Quandoque Evils -- Aquinas's Rationale for the Corruptible Order -- The Corruptible (...)
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  30. Philo’s Argument from Evil in Hume’s Dialogues X: A Semantic Interpretation. [REVIEW]Anders Kraal - 2013 - Sophia 52 (4):573-592.
    Philo's argument from evil in a much-discussed passage in Part X of Hume's Dialogues concerning Natural Religion (1779) has been interpreted in three main ways: as a logical argument from evil, as an evidential argument from evil, and as an argument against natural theology's inference of a benevolent and merciful God from the course of the world. I argue that Philo is not offering an argument of any of these sorts, but is arguing that there is a radical disanalogy between (...)
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  31. Theism, atheism, and skepticism : Bayle's background to Hume's Dialogues.Gianni Paganini - 2013 - In Winfried Schröder (ed.), Gestalten des Deismus in Europa. Harrassowitz Verlag.
  32. Hume's Seneca Reference in Dialogues 12: An Assessment of Alternatives.Lorne Falkenstein - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (1):101-104.
    In section 12 of the Dialogues, Hume claimed, without reference, that Seneca had written that to know God is to worship him. His source has proven hard to find. This note identifies some possibilities and argues in favour of one of them—one that has not been recognized by recent editors of the Dialogues.
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  33. What's True about Hume's 'True Religion'?Don Garrett - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (2):199-220.
    Despite his well-known criticisms of popular religion, Hume refers in seemingly complimentary terms to ‘true religion’; in Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, his character Philo goes so far as to express ‘veneration for’ it. This paper addresses three questions. First, did Hume himself really approve of something that he called ‘true religion’? Second, what did he mean by calling it ‘true’? Third, what did he take it to be? By appeal to some of his key doctrines about causation and probability, and (...)
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  34. Hume's 'Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion'. By Andrew Pyle. [REVIEW]Eugene Heath - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (4):546 - 547.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 4, Page 546-547, July 2012.
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  35. Hume's atheistic agenda: Philo's confession in dialogues, 12.Willem Lemmens - 2012 - Bijdragen 73 (3):281-303.
  36. The ‘true religion’ of the sceptic: Penelhum reading Hume’s Dialogues.Willem Lemmens - 2012 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (S1):183-197.
    According to Terence Penelhum, Philo's confession in the last part of Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion reveals on the side of the author a reconciliatory and pacifying attitude towards the liberal moderate clergy of his days. This article investigates whether another reading of this intriguing text is not more appropriate. It defends the idea that Philo's speeches and Cleanthes’ reactions to it in the last part of the Dialogues reveal on Hume's side an attitude of mild despair and isolation towards (...)
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  37. A Voz Articulada Proveniente Das Nuvens E A Biblioteca Natural De Cleanthes Nos Diálogos Sobre A Religião Natural De Hume: The articulate voice from the clouds and the natural library of Cleanthes in Hume’s Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.Marília Côrtes de Ferraz - 2011 - Controvérsia 7 (3).
  38. Diálogos sobre la religión natural.David Hume - 2011 - In Diálogos sobre la religión natural: edición tercer centenario (1711-2011). S.I.E.U., Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.
  39. Diálogos sobre la religión natural: edición tercer centenario (1711-2011).David Hume - 2011 - Santiago de Compostela: S.I.E.U., Universidade de Santiago de Compostela. Edited by Carlos Mellizo, Tasset Carmona, José Luis & Esperanza Guisán.
  40. David Hume, 300 años : unas palabras previas.por José L. Tasset - 2011 - In David Hume (ed.), Diálogos sobre la religión natural: edición tercer centenario (1711-2011). S.I.E.U., Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.
  41. David Hume y la religión : una bibliografía.por José L. Tasset - 2011 - In David Hume (ed.), Diálogos sobre la religión natural: edición tercer centenario (1711-2011). S.I.E.U., Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.
  42. Hume and the Problem of Evil.Michael Tooley - 2011 - In Jeffrey J. Jordan (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: The Key Thinkers. London and New York: Continuum. pp. 159-86.
    1.1 The Concept of Evil The problem of evil, in the sense relevant here, concerns the question of the reasonableness of believing in the existence of a deity with certain characteristics. In most discussions, the deity is God, understood as an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect person. But the problem of evil also arises, as Hume saw very clearly, for deities that are less than all-powerful, less than all-knowing, and less than morally perfect. What is the relevant concept of evil, (...)
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  43. Hume's 'New Scene of Thought' and the Several Faces of David Hume in the Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.Jeff Broome & John O. Nelson - 2009 - Upa.
    This book is a defense of Hume's philosophical principles in the Treatise of Human Nature. Nelson shows that Hume's new philosophy was a uniquely original and profound masterpiece in philosophical literature, worthy of serious study and acceptance. It is argued that Dialoguesis a reflective philosophical autobiography of Hume himself.
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  44. No abiding city: Hume, naturalism, and toleration.Samuel Clark - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (1):75-94.
    This paper rereads David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion as dramatising a distinctive, naturalistic account of toleration. I have two purposes in mind: first, to complete and ground Hume's fragmentary explicit discussion of toleration; second, to unearth a potentially attractive alternative to more recent, Rawlsian approaches to toleration. To make my case, I connect Dialogues and the problem of toleration to the wider themes of naturalism, scepticism and their relation in Hume's thought, before developing a new interpretation of Dialogues part (...)
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  45. No Abiding City: Hume, Naturalism, and Toleration.Samuel Clark - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (1):75-94.
    This paper rereads David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion as dramatising a distinctive, naturalistic account of toleration. I have two purposes in mind: first, to complete and ground Hume's fragmentary explicit discussion of toleration; second, to unearth a potentially attractive alternative to more recent, Rawlsian approaches to toleration. To make my case, I connect Dialogues and the problem of toleration to the wider themes of naturalism, scepticism and their relation in Hume's thought, before developing a new interpretation of Dialogues part (...)
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  46. Number, form, content: Hume's dialogues , number nine.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional (e.g. Aquinas's) arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier (...)
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  47. Number, Form, Content: Hume's Dialogues, Number Nine.Gene Fendt - 2009 - Philosophy 84 (3):393-412.
    This paper's aim is threefold. First, I wish to show that there is an analogy in section nine that arises out of the interaction of the interlocutors; this analogy is, or has, a certain comic adequatic to the traditional arguments about proofs for the existence of God. Second, Philo's seemingly inconsequential example of the strange necessity of products of 9 in section nine is a perfected analogy of the broken arguments actually given in that section, destroying Philo's earlier arguments. Finally, (...)
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  48. Andrew Pyle, Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. [REVIEW]Alan Bailey - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (4):294-296.
  49. Hume’s “farther scenes”: Maupertuis and Buffon in the Dialogues.Peter Knox-Shaw - 2008 - Hume Studies 34 (2):209-230.
    While numerous sources have been found for the ideas expressed by Cleanthes and Demea in the Dialogues, Philo's thoughts have commonly been taken to originate with Hume. It is clear, however, both from internal and external evidence, that Hume drew for his (sometimes wayward) spokesman on that mid-century ferment in the life sciences that Denis Diderot described as a "revolution." The restoration of this context—obscured by the late publication of the Dialogues —suggests that Philo's celebrated critique of theism is merely (...)
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  50. Hume, religion, literary form : Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion.John Richetti - 2008 - In Alexander John Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.), Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Pickering & Chatto.
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