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  1. Hume on Time and Steadfast Unchanging Objects.Todd Ryan & Jani Hakkarainen - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly.
    One of the most distinctive—and puzzling—features of Hume’s account of time is his insistence that because the idea of duration cannot be derived from unchanging objects, it cannot be correctly applied to them. For Hume, not only is it impossible for there to be time without succession, but strictly speaking no unchanging object can be said to endure. Nevertheless, Hume recognizes that unchanging objects can coexist with temporal successions. Hume calls such objects “stedfast and unchangeable”. However, Hume's account of them (...)
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  2. The Concealed Influence of Custom: Hume’s Treatise From the Inside Out by Jay L. Garfield. [REVIEW]Miren Boehm - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (3):511-513.
    One of the interpretive principles Jay Garfield follows in this book is the “cover principle”: “If you are unsure about what Hume is doing, close the book and read the cover”. The principle did not help when I was unsure about what Garfield was doing. The book starts with too many and incompatible goals. Garfield claims that book 2 of Hume’s Treatise is foundational to the entire Treatise and that “by taking Book II as foundational, we come to a reading (...)
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  3. Hume’s Epistemological Evolution by Hsueh M. Qu. [REVIEW]Miren Boehm - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (1):165-167.
    This is a wonderful book that ambitiously and impressively brings to convergence two parallel, perennial lines of inquiry in Hume’s scholarship. One is the classic Kemp Smith question concerning the relation between Hume’s naturalism and skepticism. The other is about the relation of the first Enquiry to book 1 of the Treatise. Qu observes that the Treatise is most distinctively naturalist or descriptive, while the Enquiry is decidedly normative. His approach is to examine the two questions through a single lens (...)
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  4. Hume's Incredible Demonstrations.Graham Clay - 2022 - Hume Studies 47 (1):55-77.
    Commentators have rightly focused on the reasons why Hume maintains that the conclusions of skeptical arguments cannot be believed, as well as on the role these arguments play in Hume’s justification of his account of the mind. Nevertheless, Hume’s interpreters should take more seriously the question of whether Hume holds that these arguments are demonstrations. Only if the arguments are demonstrations do they have the requisite status to prove Hume’s point—and justify his confidence—about the nature of the mind’s belief-generating faculties. (...)
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  5. Jay L. Garfield, The Concealed Influence of Custom: Hume's Treatise From the Inside Out. [REVIEW]Angela Michelle Coventry - 2022 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 20 (3):272-277.
  6. "What is Holding Us Together? David Hume, Edgar Allan Poe and the Problem of Association".Maya Kronfeld - 2022 - Review of English Studies.
    Poe’s experimental fiction revitalizes Hume’s ambivalent empiricism, the complexities of which were sometimes obscured in the philosopher’s nineteenth-century American reception. Poe’s ‘Murders in the Rue Morgue’ broaches formally the question of how one thought leads to another, while ‘The Man that Was Used Up’ stages the question of what grounds the unity of one’s thoughts. Reading both tales together exposes the scope and limits of an associationist paradigm often traced back to Hume. But reading Hume through Poe’s verbal art reveals (...)
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  7. Knowledge and Sensory Knowledge in Hume's Treatise.Graham Clay - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 10:195-229.
    I argue that the Hume of the Treatise maintains an account of knowledge according to which (i) every instance of knowledge must be an immediately present perception (i.e., an impression or an idea); (ii) an object of this perception must be a token of a knowable relation; (iii) this token knowable relation must have parts of the instance of knowledge as relata (i.e., the same perception that has it as an object); and any perception that satisfies (i)-(iii) is an instance (...)
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  8. Natural Fiction and Artifice in Hume's Treatise.Brent C. Delaney - 2021 - Dissertation, York University
    David Hume's early philosophy appeals to fiction and artifice to explain several important features in our cognitive and social activity. In this dissertation, I develop a typology of Humean fictions and artifices to clarify and render his account consistent. In so doing, I identify a special class of fictions I divide into natural fictions and natural artifices. I argue that this special class of cognitive and social fictions represents a significant break with prior English-speaking philosophers, such as Francis Bacon and (...)
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  9. The Politics of Religion in Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature.Jonathan H. Krause - 2021 - Review of Metaphysics 75 (1):23-56.
  10. The Dual Account of Reason and the Spirit of Philosophy in Hume's Treatise.Erik W. Matson - 2021 - Hume Studies 43 (2):29-56.
  11. Hume's 'Two Definitions' of Causation and the Ontology of 'Double Existence' (Revised) with an Appendix 2021.Paul Russell - 2021 - In Recasting Hume and early Modern Philosophy: Selected Essays. New York, NY, USA: pp. 3-31.
    This essay provides an interpretation of Hume’s “two definitions” of causation. It argues that the two definitions of causation must be interpreted in terms of Hume’s fundamental ontological distinction between perceptions and (material) objects. Central to Hume’s position on this subject is the claim that, while there is a natural tendency to suppose that there exist (metaphysical) causal powers in objects themselves, this is a product of our failure to distinguish perceptions and objects. Properly understood, our idea of causation involves (...)
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  12. Hume's Epistemological Evolution. [REVIEW]Matias Slavov - 2021 - Philosophical Quarterly 71 (4):pqaa090.
    Hsueh M. Qu's research book begins with two central problems in Hume scholarship: (1) What is the relation between scepticism and naturalism? (2) What is the relation between the first book of the Treatise (THN) and the first Enquiry (EHU)? His premise is that by answering the second question, the first question will be answered as well.
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  13. The Two Forms of Doxastic Normativity in Hume's Treatise.Sam Zahn - 2021 - Hume Studies 44 (1):3-22.
    Recent commentators have contended that Hume’s skeptical arguments in the Treatise lead him to eschew a traditional epistemic account of justification in favor of a pragmatic account. While this view resolves some textual puzzles, others arise. Instead, Hume should be read as endorsing two completely distinct standards of doxastic normativity: the epistemic and the pragmatic. The epistemic grants beliefs philosophical approval, while the pragmatic circumscribes the domain of investigation to prevent reasoning that leads to extreme skepticism. I argue that the (...)
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  14. The Humors in Hume's Skepticism.Charles Goldhaber - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7:789–824.
    In the conclusion to the first book of the Treatise, Hume's skeptical reflections have plunged him into melancholy. He then proceeds through a complex series of stages, resulting in renewed interest in philosophy. Interpreters have struggled to explain the connection between the stages. I argue that Hume's repeated invocation of the four humors of ancient and medieval medicine explains the succession, and sheds a new light on the significance of skepticism. The humoral context not only reveals that Hume conceives of (...)
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  15. The Broader Context of Sympathy in Book 2 of the Treatise.Hynek Janoušek - 2020 - Hume Studies 46 (1):33-55.
  16. The Concealed Influence of Custom: Hume's Treatise From the Inside Out.Jay L. Garfield - 2019 - Oup Usa.
    Jay L. Garfield defends two exegetical theses regarding Hume's Treatise on Human Nature. The first is that Book II is the theoretical foundation of the Treatise. Second, Garfield argues that we cannot understand Hume's project without an appreciation of his own understanding of custom, and in particular, without an appreciation of the grounding of his thought about custom in the legal theory and debates of his time.
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  17. El conocimiento como sistema en el Tratado de la Natuaraleza de David Hume.Jean P. Martínez Zepeda - 2019 - Revista de Filosofía 76:93-110.
    La comprensión del conocimiento como sistema en el Tratado de la naturaleza humana de David Hume reconoce tres aspectos: primero, el conocimiento implica su distancia de la idea de sustancia y de ideas generales abstractas. Segundo, el conocimiento comprende la conexión entre impresiones e ideas. El enlace de nuestras impresiones e ideas surge del principio de asociación el cual ordena y reconfigura el conocimiento en virtud de la atracción, conexión articulada por las facultades de la memoria y la imaginación. Tercero, (...)
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  18. The Routledge Guidebook to Hume’s a Treatise of Human Nature.P. J. E. Kail - 2018 - Routledge.
  19. Jean-Baptiste Du Bos’ Critical Reflections on Poetry and Painting and Hume’s Treatise.James O. Young & Margaret Cameron - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):119-130.
    It has long been known that Jean-Baptiste Du Bos exercised a considerable influence on Hume’s essays and, in particular, on the ‘Of the Standard of Taste’ and ‘Of Tragedy’. It has also been noted that some passages in the Treatise bear marks of Du Bos’ influence. In this essay, we identify many more passages in the Treatise that bear unmistakable signs of Du Bos’ influence. We demonstrate that Du Bos certainly had a significant impact on Hume as he wrote the (...)
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  20. A Ideia de Espaço No Tratado da Natureza Humana, de Hume.Andrea Cachel - 2017 - Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 22 (1):11-36.
    Passando por uma abordagem do contexto de análise no qual Hume está inserido, o debate entre Locke e Berkeley quanto à abstração da extensão,o artigo expõe a discussão humeana acerca da ideia de espaço, a partir da sua rejeição da tese da divisibilidade infinita da extensão e da sua defesa do atomismo perceptivo. Nesse contexto, é apresentado o debate humeano que resulta na sustentação da existência dos pontos matemáticos, bem como a sua análise quanto à natureza da matemática, especialmente da (...)
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  21. Fifteen Years of a Classic: New Humean Studies.Leandro Hollanda - 2017 - Prometeus 23:139-150.
    "I tend to agree with more dialectical positions such as Noxon's who, even being a critic of the approach of the two concepts, writes the following: Hume explained certain mental phenomena, notably belief, as effects of the association. And, going further, I say that belief is a feeling or sensation aroused by two factors: habit and the association of ideas, but it does not arise either from one or from other singly, each one is a part of a process that (...)
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  22. A Lógica da Ficção No "Tratado" de Hume.Pedro Jonas de Almeida - 2016 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 57 (134):455-469.
    RESUMO No Livro I, parte IV, do "Tratado da natureza humana", Hume desenvolve aquilo que vamos chamar de lógica da ficção. Não se trata de um simples erro da imaginação enquanto fantasia, mas de uma propensão a criar ideias, entidades e objetos a partir das percepções presentes na mente. O que resulta daí é um sentido rico e novo de ficção que permite a Hume desenvolver uma história natural da filosofia, descrevendo a gênese inevitável de conceitos metafísicos. Partindo de uma (...)
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  23. Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (1):55-77.
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in the Abstract that he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on Book (...)
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  24. Ensaios sobre a filosofia de Hume.Jaimir Conte, Marília Cortês de Ferraz & Flávio Zimmermann - 2016 - Santa Catarina: Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC).
    1. Hume e a Magna Carta: em torno do círculo da justiça, Maria Isabel Limongi; 2. Hume e o problema da justificação da resistência ao governo, Stephanie Hamdan Zahreddine; 3 O surgimento dos costumes da sociedade comercial e as paixões do trabalho, Pedro Vianna da Costa e Faria; 4. O sentido da crença: suas funções epistêmicas e implicações para a teoria política de Hume, Lilian Piraine Laranja; 5. O Status do Fideísmo na Crítica de Hume à Religião Natural, Marília Côrtes (...)
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  25. A Treatise of Human Nature, a Treatise of the World?Claude Gautier - 2016 - In Stephen Gaukroger & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), Descartes' Treatise on Man and its Reception. Springer.
    My contention is to understand in what manner Hume’s Treatise of Human Nature should be considered: is it a Traité de l’homme or is it a major contribution to modern historical anthropology? I shall emphasize the fact that from Descartes to Hume the problem of what “human nature” is contrasts very strongly. Such contrasts are to be based on the very specific dimension of Hume’s scepticism; on the fact that human nature should be now considered as basically historical.
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  26. Conscious Ambivalence.Hili Razinsky - 2016 - Human Studies 39 (3):365–384.
    Although ambivalence in a strict sense, according to which a person holds opposed attitudes, and holds them as opposed, is an ordinary and widespread phenomenon, it appears impossible on the common presupposition that persons are either unitary or plural. These two conceptions of personhood call for dispensing with ambivalence by employing tactics of harmonizing, splitting, or annulling the unitary subject. However, such tactics are useless if ambivalence is sometimes strictly conscious. This paper sharpens the notion of conscious ambivalence, such that (...)
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  27. Review of James Harris, Hume: An Intellectual Biography. [REVIEW]Paul Russell - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 1.
    James A. Harris's biography of David Hume is the first such study to appear since Ernest Mossner's The Life of David Hume (1954). Unlike Mossner, Harris aims to write a specifically "intellectual biography", one that gives "a complete picture of Hume's ideas" and "relates Hume's works to the circumstances in which they were conceived and written" (vii). Harris's study turns on four central theses or claims about the character of Hume's thought and how it is structured and developed. The claims (...)
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  28. The Cambridge Companion to Hume's Treatise.John Shand - 2016 - Philosophical Quarterly 66 (265):887-889.
  29. Inferences, External Objects, and the Principle of Contradiction: Hume's Adequacy Principle in Part II of the Treatise.Wilson Underkuffler - 2016 - Florida Philosophical Review 16 (1):23-40.
    This paper considers whether elements of T 1.2 Of the Ideas of Space and Time in Hume’s Treatise is inconsistent with skepticism regarding the external world in T 1.4.2 Of Scepticism with regard to the Senses. This apparent tension vexes commentators, and efforts to resolve it drives the recent scholarship on this section of Hume’s Treatise. To highlight this tension I juxtapose Hume’s “Adequacy Principle” with what I call his “skeptical causal argument” in T 1.4.2. The Adequacy Principle appears to (...)
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  30. The Cambridge Companion to Hume's Treatise.Joshua M. Wood - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (2):380-382.
  31. Hume, Justice and Sympathy: A Reversal of the Natural Order?Sophie Botros - 2015 - Diametros 44:110-139.
    Hume’s view that the object of moral feeling is a natural passion, motivating action, causes problems for justice. There is apparently no appropriate natural motive, whilst, if there were, its “partiality” would unfit it to ground the requisite impartial approval. We offer a critique of such solutions as that the missing non-moral motive is enlightened self-interest, or that it is feigned, or that it consists in a just disposition. We reject Cohon’s postulation of a moral motive for just acts, and (...)
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  32. Hume’s Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation by Frederick F. Schmitt. [REVIEW]Daniel Flage - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (1):151-153.
  33. David Hume: Unwitting Cosmopolitan?Edward W. Glowienka - 2015 - Diametros 44:153-172.
    If Hume is considered cosmopolitan in his ethics at all, he is said to be so through his anti-mercantilist approach to commerce. Prevailing commercial interpretations attribute to Hume a cosmopolitanism that is best described as instrumental and supervenient. I argue that Hume’s principles lead to a cosmopolitan ethic that is more demanding than commercial interpretations recognize. Hume’s cosmopolitanism is more than merely supervenient and its instrumentality is such that cosmopolitan regard becomes inseparable from healthy patriotic concern. I show sympathy and (...)
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  34. The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion, by Paul Russell.K. Meeker - 2015 - Mind 124 (494):675-679.
  35. Frederick Schmitt, Hume's Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014. 448 Pp. £55.00 Hb. ISBN 9780199683116. [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2015 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 13 (2):152-158.
    In this book, Schmitt claims that Hume, however implicitly, employs a fully-developed epistemology in the Treatise. In particular, Hume employs a “veritistic” epistemology, i.e. one that is grounded in truth, particularly, true beliefs. In some cases, these true beliefs are “certain,” are “infallible” (78) and are justified, as in the case of knowledge, i.e. demonstrations. In other cases, we acquire these beliefs through a reliable method, i.e. when they are produced by causal proofs. Such beliefs are also “certain” (69, 81) (...)
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  36. Justice, Sympathy and the Command of Our Esteem.Jacqueline Taylor - 2015 - Diametros 44:173-188.
    I have shown here the different roles that sympathy plays in the accounts of justice in the Treatise and Enquiry. In the former work, a redirected sympathy naturally extends our concern, and subsequently our moral approval or blame, to all those included within the scope of the rules of justice. In the Enquiry, we find this same progress of sentiments, but Hume’s introduction of the sentiment of humanity allows him to make a stronger case for the importance of those virtues (...)
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  37. Why Compassion Still Needs Hume Today.Margreet van der Cingel - 2015 - Diametros 44:140-152.
    Over the past years the relevance of compassion for society and specific practices such as in healthcare is becoming a focus of attention. Philosophers and scientists discuss theoretical descriptions and defining characteristics of the phenomenon and its benefits and pitfalls. However, there are hardly any empirical studies which substantiate these writings in specific societal areas. Besides, compassion may be in the eye of attention today but has always been of interest for many contemporary philosophers as well as philosophers in the (...)
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  38. La ley de Hume en Hume: la discusión de la interpretación analítica de Treatise III, 1, i.Felipe Widow Lira - 2015 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 32 (2):415-434.
    La regla lógica que prohíbe inferir conclusiones morales o normativas desde premisas fácticas fue atribuida a David Hume por los primeros autores analíticos que se ocuparon de esta cuestión, llegando a ser conocida, esta regla, como la ley de Hume. Sin embargo, esta atribución ha sido fuertemente discutida desde entonces. El propósito de este trabajo es sistematizar los argumentos de esta discusión desde su origen -que se encuentra en un trabajo de A.C. MacIntyrehasta la intervención de J.M. Finnis, en razón (...)
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  39. Hume's Humanity and the Protection of the Vulnerable.Ivana Zagorac - 2015 - Diametros 44:189-203.
    It is well known that Hume excluded inferior rational beings, who are incapable of resistance and weak resentment, from his concept of justice. This resulted in a critique of Hume’s theory of justice, as it would not protect those who were the most vulnerable against ill treatment. The typical answer to this critique is that Hume excluded inferior rational beings from the concept of justice, but not from that of morality, and that he considered their protection to be the task (...)
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  40. The Cambridge Companion to Hume's Treatise.Donald C. Ainslie & Annemarie Butler (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Revered for his contributions to empiricism, skepticism and ethics, David Hume remains one of the most important figures in the history of Western philosophy. His first and broadest work, A Treatise of Human Nature, comprises three volumes, concerning the understanding, the passions and morals. He develops a naturalist and empiricist program, illustrating that the mind operates through the association of impressions and ideas. This Companion features essays by leading scholars that evaluate the philosophical content of the arguments in Hume's Treatise (...)
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  41. Hume's Treatment of Denial in the Treatise.Lewis Powell - 2014 - Philosophers' Imprint 14.
    David Hume fancied himself the Newton of the mind, aiming to reinvent the study of human mental life in the same way that Newton had revolutionized physics. And it was his view that the novel account of belief he proposed in his Treatise of Human Nature was one of that work’s central philosophical contributions. From the earliest responses to the Treatise forward, however, there was deep pessimism about the prospects for his account. It is easy to understand the source of (...)
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  42. Hume’s Epistemology in the Treatise: A Veritistic Interpretation.Frederick F. Schmitt - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Frederick F. Schmitt offers a new account of Hume's epistemology in A Treatise of Human Nature, which alternately manifests scepticism, empiricism, and naturalism. Critics have emphasised one of these positions over the others, but Schmitt argues that they can be reconciled by tracing them to an underlying epistemology of knowledge and probability.
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  43. The Normativity of Experience and Causal Belief in Hume’s Treatise.Miren Boehm - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):203-231.
    What is the source of normativity in Hume’s account of causal reasoning? In virtue of what are causal beliefs justified for Hume? To answer these questions, the literature appeals, almost invariably, to custom or some feature thereof. I argue, in contrast, that causal beliefs are justified for Hume because they issue from experience. Although he denies experience the title of justifying reason, for Hume experience has normative authority. I offer an interpretation of the source and nature of the normativity of (...)
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  44. Ein Traktat Über Die Menschliche Natur. Band 2: Buch Ii: Über Die Affekte; Buch Iii: Über Moral.David Hume - 2013 - Felix Meiner Verlag.
    Das Erstlingswerk von David Hume , das hier in der bearbeiteten Übersetzung von Theodor Lipps neu ediert wird, trägt den Titel A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects; die Bücher I und II der Schrift wurden 1739 anonym publiziert, Buch III folgte 1740, ebenfalls anonym. Die großen Erwartungen, die der Autor in die Veröffentlichung der drei Bücher setzte, erfüllten sich nicht – sie fielen »als Totgeburt aus der Presse« . (...)
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  45. Ein Traktat Über Die Menschliche Natur. Band 1: Buch I: Über den Verstand.David Hume - 2013 - Felix Meiner Verlag.
    Neuausgabe des grundlegenden Werkes des englischen Empirismus nach der Übersetzung von Theodor LippsDas Erstlingswerk von David Hume , das hier in der bearbeiteten Übersetzung von Theodor Lipps neu ediert wird, trägt den Titel A Treatise of Human Nature: Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects; die Bücher I und II der Schrift wurden 1739 anonym publiziert, Buch III folgte 1740, ebenfalls anonym. Die großen Erwartungen, die der Autor in die Veröffentlichung der drei Bücher setzte, (...)
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  46. Anglicanism, Scottish Presbyterianism, and the Irreligious Aim of Hume’s Treatise.Anders Kraal - 2013 - Hume Studies 39 (2):169-196.
    According to Paul Russell’s irreligious interpretation of Hume’s Treatise, the aim of the Treatise is to discredit “Christian theology” generically construed. In this paper, I argue that in seeking to discredit Christian theology in the Treatise, Hume uses an early eighteenth-century Anglican version of Christian theology rather than “Christian theology” in a generic sense as his theological paradigm. Taking Hume’s attacks on “hidden powers” and “the liberty of indifference” as test-cases, I show that whereas Hume’s views on these topics are (...)
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  47. Can the Social Contract Be Signed by an Invisible Hand?Bernd Lahno & Geoffrey Brennan (eds.) - 2013 - RMM.
    The title of this special topic in RMM is borrowed from a 1978 paper of Hillel Steiner in which he argues against Robert Nozick's invisible hand conception of the emergence of the state. Steiner believes that central institutions of social order such as money and government need some form of conscious endorsement by individuals to emerge and to persist over time. -/- Tony de Jasay's critique (in Philosophy 85, 2010) of Bob Sugden's plea for a Humean version of contractarianism (see (...)
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  48. Epistemological Commitment in Hume's Treatise.Louis E. Loeb - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:309-348.
  49. Paul Russell, The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008). [REVIEW]Lorenzo Greco - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):432-35.
  50. Humen teoria avaruuden ymmärtämisestä.Jani Hakkarainen - 2012 - In Valtteri Viljanen, Helena Siipi & Matti Sintonen (eds.), Ymmärrys. Turku: Uniprint. pp. 67-75.
    Title in English: Hume's Theory of Understanding Space.
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