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  1. The Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (OP-ICESCR).Deepa Kansra & Mallika Ramachandran - manuscript
    Human rights treaties are often attached and complemented with Optional Protocols. The Optional protocol instruments are adopted after careful deliberation between different stakeholders including member states to human rights treaties. -/- The present document on Introduction to the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights- Optional Protocol [OP-ICESCR] is an addition to the on-going work on the Human Rights Framework on ESC Rights. It covers basic information on the objectives of the OP and the key provisions dealing with the (...)
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  2. Health, Migration and Human Rights.Johannes Kniess - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-19.
    Doctors, nurses and midwifes from developing countries migrate to affluent countries in large numbers, often leaving behind severely understaffed healthcare systems. One way to limit this ‘brain drain’ is to restrict the freedom of movement of healthcare workers. Yet this seems to give rise to a conflict of human rights: on the one hand rights to freedom of movement, on the other hand rights to health. By motivating its own account of human rights, this paper argues that the conflict is (...)
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  3. Human Rights Under Emergency: A Normative Assessment of Derogation.Cristian Rettig & Giulio Fornaroli - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice.
    International human rights law allows states to derogate some of their human rights obligations in times of public emergency. This essay attempts a normative assessment of the practice of derogation. We discuss,specifically, whether derogation is compatible with the logics and morality of rights. We notice that a major inconsistency between rights and derogation derives from the unilateral character of derogation: derogating parties are assigned a power-right to annul their own rights-based obligations. This contrasts with the idea,central to rights, that rights-based (...)
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  4. Human Rights and Caribbean Philosophy: Implications for Teaching.Benjamin Davis - 2021 - Journal of Human Rights Practice 12 (4).
    This note on human rights practice observes that some pedagogical methods in human rights education can have the effect of making human rights violations both seem to be performed by abnormal, bad actors and seem to occur in places far away from US classrooms. This effect is not intended by instructors; a methodological corrective would be helpful to human rights education. This note provides a corrective by suggesting two practices: (1) a pedagogical emphasis on what the Martinican philosopher Édouard Glissant (...)
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  5. The Promises of Standing Rock: Three Approaches to Human Rights.Benjamin Davis - 2021 - Humanity 12 (2):205-225.
    Any appeal to a right raises the question of a corresponding duty. If one bears a right, then who bears the duty to respect, protect, and enforce that right? In this essay, I contend that human rights claims need not be oriented to or reliant on the state. I start from and conclude with lessons from the 2016 protests at Standing Rock. Standing Rock, I argue, exemplifies critical theory that organizes communities through the language of human rights.
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  6. Intervening on Behalf of the Human Right to Health: Who, When, and How?Kathryn Muyskens - 2021 - Human Rights Review 22 (2):173-191.
    A common understanding of the political function of human rights is as a trigger for international intervention, with states typically understood to be duty bound by these rights claims. The unique character of the human right to health raises some complications for these conventional views. In this paper, I will argue that because of the unique character of the human right to health, intervention on its behalf can be justified not only in response to outright violation, but also due to (...)
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  7. Minimalism, Determinacy, and Human Rights.Robert Mark Simpson - 2021 - Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 34 (1):149-169.
    Many theorists understand human rights as only aiming to secure a minimally decent existence, rather than a positively good or flourishing life. Some of the theoretical considerations that support this minimalist view have been mapped out in the philosophical literature. The aim of this paper is to explain how a relatively neglected theoretical desideratum – namely, determinacy – can be invoked in arguing for human rights minimalism. Most of us want a theory of human rights whose demands can be realized, (...)
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  8. What Could Human Rights Do? A Decolonial Inquiry.Benjamin Davis - 2020 - Transmodernity 5 (9):1-22.
    It is one thing to consider what human rights have been and another to inquire into what they could be. In this essay, I present a history of human rights vis-à-vis decolonization. I follow the scholarship of Samuel Moyn to suggest that human rights presented a “moral alternative” to political utopias. The question remains how to politicize the moral energy around human rights today. I argue that defending what Édouard Glissant calls a “right to opacity” could politicize the ethical energy (...)
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  9. The Human Right to Democracy and the Pursuit of Global Justice.Pablo Gilabert - 2020 - In Thom Brooks (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Global Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 279-301.
  10. Actualizing Human Rights: Global Inequality, Future People, and Motivation.Jos Philips - 2020 - London: Routledge.
    This book argues that ultimately human rights can be actualized, in two senses. By answering important challenges to them, the real-world relevance of human rights can be brought out; and people worldwide can be motivated as needed for realizing human rights. Taking a perspective from moral and political philosophy, the book focuses on two challenges to human rights that have until now received little attention, but that need to be addressed if human rights are to remain plausible as a global (...)
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  11. The Human Right to Free Internet Access.Merten Reglitz - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (2): 314-331.
    In 2016, the United Nation’s General Assembly adopted a non-binding resolution regarding ‘The Promotion, Protection and Enjoyment of Human Rights on the Internet’. At the heart of this resolution is the UN’s concern that ‘rights that people have offline must also be protected online.’ While the UN thus recognises the importance of the Internet, it does so problematically selectively by focusing on protecting existing offline rights online. I argue instead that Internet access is itself a moral human right that requires (...)
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  12. Against Borders: Why the World Needs Free Movement of People.Alex Sager - 2020 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This book carefully engages philosophical arguments for and against open borders, bringing together major approaches to open borders across disciplines and establishing the feasibility of open borders against the charge of utopianism.
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  13. African Challenges to the International Criminal Court: An Example of Populism?Renee Nicole Souris - 2020 - In AMINTAPHIL: The Philosophical Foundations of Law and Justice. pp. 255-268.
    Recent global efforts of the United States and England to withdraw from international institutions, along with recent challenges to human rights courts from Poland and Hungary, have been described as part of a growing global populist backlash against the liberal international order. Several scholars have even identified the recent threat of mass withdrawal of African states from the International Criminal Court (ICC) as part of this global populist backlash. Are the African challenges to the ICC part of a global populist (...)
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  14. Welcome to Hell on Earth - Artificial Intelligence, Babies, Bitcoin, Cartels, China, Democracy, Diversity, Dysgenics, Equality, Hackers, Human Rights, Islam, Liberalism, Prosperity, The Web.Michael Richard Starks - 2020 - Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press.
    America and the world are in the process of collapse from excessive population growth, most of it for the last century and now all of it due to 3rd world people. Consumption of resources and the addition of one or two billion more ca. 2100 will collapse industrial civilization and bring about starvation, disease, violence and war on a staggering scale. Billions will die and nuclear war is all but certain. In America this is being hugely accelerated by massive immigration (...)
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  15. The Link Between Subsistence and Human Rights.Jesse Tomalty - 2020 - In Thom Brooks (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Global Justice. Oxford, UK: pp. 183-198.
    This paper constitutes an exploration and evaluation of the so-called ‘linkage argument' in support of the inclusion of a right to subsistence among human rights. While it is uncontroversial that avoiding poverty is hugely important for all humans, the human right to subsistence and other socio-economic human rights are often regarded as social goals rather than genuine rights. The linkage argument aims to show that a commitment to the existence of any human rights at all entails a commitment to the (...)
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  16. Cultural Differences as Excuses? Human Rights and Cultural Values in Global Ethics and Governance of AI.Pak-Hang Wong - 2020 - Philosophy and Technology 33 (4):705-715.
    Cultural differences pose a serious challenge to the ethics and governance of artificial intelligence from a global perspective. Cultural differences may enable malignant actors to disregard the demand of important ethical values or even to justify the violation of them through deference to the local culture, either by affirming the local culture lacks specific ethical values, e.g., privacy, or by asserting the local culture upholds conflicting values, e.g., state intervention is good. One response to this challenge is the human rights (...)
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  17. Metaphysics of Human Rights. 1948-2018. On the Occasion of the 70th Anniversary of the UDHR.Elisa Grimi & Luca Di Donato (eds.) - 2019 - Vernon Press.
    The 1948 Declaration of Human Rights demanded a collaboration among exponents from around the world. Embodying many different cultural perspectives, it was driven by a like-minded belief in the importance of finding common principles that would be essential for the very survival of civilization. Although an arduous and extensive process, the result was a much sought-after and collective endeavor that would be referenced for decades to come. Motivated by the seventieth anniversary of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and (...)
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  18. Relational African Values Between Nations.Thaddeus Metz - 2019 - In Francis Onditi & Gilad Ben-Nun (eds.), Contemporary Africa and the Foreseeable World Order. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 133-150.
    This chapter considers how some international ethical matters might be approached differently in the English-speaking literature if values salient in sub-Saharan Africa were taken seriously. Specifically, after pointing out how indigenous values in this part of the world tend to prescribe relating communally, this chapter articulates a moral-philosophical interpretation of communal relationship and brings out what such an ethic entails for certain aspects of globalization, political power, foreign relations, and criminal justice. The chapter suggests that the implications of a communal (...)
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  19. Examining Pharmaceutical Exceptionalism: Intellectual Property, Practical Expediency, and Global Health.Govind Persad - 2019 - Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics 18:157-90.
    Advocates, activists, and academics have criticized pharmaceutical intellectual property ("pharma IP") rights as obstacles to access to medicines for the global poor. These criticisms of pharma IP holders are frequently exceptionalist: they focus on pharma IP holders while ignoring whether others also bear obligations to assist patients in need. These others include holders of other lucrative IP rights, such as music copyrights or technology patents; firms, such as energy companies and banks, that do not rely on IP; and wealthy private (...)
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  20. Economic Liberties and Human Rights.Jahel Queralt & Bas Van Der Vossen (eds.) - 2019 - New York, USA: Routledge Press.
    The status of economic liberties remains a serious lacuna in the theory and practice of human rights. Should a minimally just society protect the freedoms to sell, save, profit and invest? Is being prohibited to run a business a human rights violation? While these liberties enjoy virtually no support from the existing philosophical theories of human rights and little protection by the international human rights law, they are of tremendous importance in the lives of individuals, and particularly the poor. Like (...)
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  21. Review of Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao, and Massimo Renzo (Eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. [REVIEW]Robert Mark Simpson - 2019 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 16 (4):517-520.
    This is a review of a long, comprehensive, and mostly very good collection of philosophical essays on human rights. I briefly summarise the main ideas put forward in some of the essays that I most admired in the collection. While the collection includes essays from proponents of a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives, I suggest in my review that the collection's overall function is to serve as a kind of demonstrative rejoinder to those philosophers, like Raz, who argue (...)
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  22. The Rights of Families and Children at the Border.Matthew J. Lister - 2018 - In Philosophical Foundations of Children's and Family Law. pp. 153-170.
    Family ties play a particular and distinctive role in immigration policy. Essentially every country allows ‘family-based immigration’ of some sorts, and family ties may have significant importance in many other areas of immigration policy as well, grounding ‘derivative’ rights to asylum, providing access to citizenship and other benefits at accelerated rates, and serving as a shield from the danger of removal or deportation. Furthermore, status as a child may provide certain benefits to irregular migrants or others without proper immigration standing (...)
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  23. Enforcing the Global Economic Order, Violating the Rights of the Poor, and Breaching Negative Duties? Pogge, Collective Agency, and Global Poverty.Bill Wringe - 2018 - Journal of Social Philosophy 49 (2):334-370.
    Thomas Pogge has argued, famously, that ‘we’ are violating the rights of the global poor insofar as we uphold an unjust international order which provides a legal and economic framework within which individuals and groups can and do deprive such individuals of their lives, liberty and property. I argue here that Pogge’s claim that we are violating a negative duty can only be made good on the basis of a substantive theory of collective action; and that it can only provide (...)
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  24. When the Practice Gets Complicated: Human Rights, Migrants, and Political Institutions.Jelena Belic - 2017 - In Reidar Maliks & Johan Schaffer (eds.), Moral and Political Conceptions of Human Rights: Implications for Theory and Practice. pp. 181 - 203.
  25. A Presumptive Right to Exclude: From Imposed Obligations To A Viable Threshold.Benedikt Buechel - 2017 - Global Politics Review 3 (1):98-108.
    In “Immigration, Jurisdiction and Exclusion”, Michael Blake develops a new line of argument to defend a state’s presumptive right to exclude would-be immigrants. His account grounds this right on the state as a legal community that must protect and fulfill human rights. Although Blake’s present argument is valid and attractive in being less arbitrary than national membership and in distinguishing different types of immigrants’ claims, I dismiss it for being unsound due to a lack of further elaboration. The reason for (...)
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  26. Climate Ethics in a Dark and Dangerous Time.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2017 - Ethics 127 (2):430-465.
    A critical study of two recent books in climate ethics by Dale Jamieson (Reason in a Dark Time, Oxford 2014), and Darrel Moellendorf (The Moral and Political Challenges of Climate Change, Cambridge 2014).
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  27. Responsibility Allocation and Human Rights.Anthony Reeves - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (3):627-642.
    How does morality allocate responsibility for what it requires? I am concerned here with one fundamental part of this question, namely, how morality determines responsibility when multiple agents are capable of contributing to or completing a moral task, and special relationships capable of generating duties with respect to the task are non-existent, insufficient as a moral response, or partly indeterminate. On one view, responsibility falls to the agents who can bear it with the least burden. I show why this is (...)
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  28. The Review of "Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights". [REVIEW]Jelena Belic - 2016 - Public Law 4:741 - 745.
  29. New Directions in Theorizing Human Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2016 - Journal of International Political Theory 12 (1):3-9.
    An introduction to a symposium of new articles on human rights, situating them in trends in contemporary human rights theory more broadly, including debates on moral versus political rights, women's human rights, children's rights, and disability rights. Symposium includes articles by feminist political theorists Brooke Ackerly, Nancy Hirschmann, Regina Kreide, Marina Calloni, and Eileen Hunt Botting.
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  30. Vulnerable Populations and the Duty to Exclude.Luara Ferracioli - 2016 - Journal of Ethics and Global Politics 9 (1):33501.
    How should states respond to the departure of talented individuals from the developing to the developed world--the so-called brain drain? In Debating Brain Drain, Gillian Brock and Michael Blake investigate whether restrictions on emigration can be justified in order to avoid the harmful effects of the brain drain. In this piece, I argue that the question of whether states have the right to limit the exit of their skilled citizens cannot be answered in isolation from the question of what global (...)
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  31. Labor Human Rights and Human Dignity.Pablo Gilabert - 2016 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 42 (2):171-199.
    The current legal and political practice of human rights invokes entitlements to freely chosen work, to decent working conditions, and to form and join labor unions. Despite the importance of these rights, they remain under-explored in the philosophical literature on human rights. This article offers a systematic and constructive discussion of them. First, it surveys the content and current relevance of the labor rights stated in the most important documents of the human rights practice. Second, it gives a moral defense (...)
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  32. Dignity- A Regenerative Idea.Deepa Kansra - 2016 - Indian Law Institute Law Review (ILI Law Review) 2 (Winter):202-203.
    AN ATTEMPT to understand the role of dignity in human rights is worthwhile and challenging. Popularly referred to as a “constitutional principle”, “moral precept”, or a “supreme virtue”, dignity has allowed legal systems to adopt evolutionary and impactful practices concerning the welfare of human beings. Defined also as the precursor and basis to the various human rights defined and adopted, dignity continues to facilitate the integration of diverse interests and stakeholders within the framework of human rights thought and practice. By (...)
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  33. Alien Ideas: Review of Strangers in Our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration, by David Miller. [REVIEW]Lister Matthew - 2016 - Thew New Rambler 2016.
    David Miller, Professor of Politics at Oxford University, has long been one of the most important and interesting contributors to political theory and philosophy. He is well known for insisting on the mutual relevance of philosophical reflection and political practice, an approach well captured by the title of his recent book, Justice for Earthlings. In his most recent book, Strangers in our Midst: The Political Philosophy of Immigration, Miller revises and extends the work he has been doing for several years (...)
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  34. Human Rights and Threats Concerning Future People: A Sufficientarian Proposal.Jos Philips - 2016 - In Gerhard Bos & Marcus Düwell (eds.), Human Rights and Threats concerning Future People: a Sufficientarian Proposal. London: Routledge. pp. 82-94.
    Can human rights incorporate future people and their interests, considering all the risks and uncertainties by which these interests are surrounded? Given problems such as climate change, resource depletion and pollution, human rights cannot afford not to be able to do this if they are to remain relevant. On the other hand, taking future people on board may lead to (another) multiplication of human rights claims, and this is hardly good news either. Therefore, an adequate account of how to incorporate (...)
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  35. Justifying International Legal Human Rights.Jesse Tomalty - 2016 - Ethics and International Affairs 30 (4):483-490.
    In The Heart of Human Rights, Allen Buchanan emphasizes the distinction between moral human rights (MHRs) on the one hand and international legal human rights (ILHRs) on the other. MHRs are the moral rights held universally by all humans simply in virtue of being human. ILHRs are the legal rights of international practice, which are articulated in the United Nations’ International Bill of Rights and related legal documents. One of the most controversial aspects of Buchanan’s account of human rights is (...)
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  36. Responding to Global Injustice: On the Right of Resistance.Simon Caney - 2015 - Social Philosophy and Policy 32 (1):51-73.
    Imagine that you are a farmer living in Kenya. Though you work hard to sell your produce to foreign markets you find yourself unable to do so because affluent countries subsidize their own farmers and erect barriers to trade, like tariffs, thereby undercutting you in the marketplace. As a consequence of their actions you languish in poverty despite your very best efforts. Or, imagine that you are a peasant whose livelihood depends on working in the fields in Indonesia and you (...)
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  37. Enforcement Matters: Reframing the Philosophical Debate Over Immigration.José Jorge Mendoza - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (1):73-90.
    In debating the ethics of immigration, philosophers have focused much of their attention on determining whether a political community ought to have the discretionary right to control immigration. They have not, however, given the same amount of consideration to determining whether there are any ethical limits on how a political community enforces its immigration policy. This article, therefore, offers a different approach to immigration justice. It presents a case against legitimate states having discretionary control over immigration by showing both how (...)
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  38. Human Rights and Political Toleration in India: Multiplicity, Self, and Interconnectedness.Ashwani Kumar Peetush - 2015 - In Ashwani Peetush & Jay Drydyk (eds.), Human Rights: India and the West. New Delhi, Delhi, India: pp. 205-228.
    I would argue that toleration is one of the cornerstones for a just social order in any pluralistic society. Yet, the ideal of toleration is usually thought to originate from within, and most often justified from a European historical and philosophical context. It is thought to be a response to societal conflict and the Wars of Religion in the West, which is then exported to the rest of the world, by colonialism (ironically), or globalization. The West and White liberal philosophers, (...)
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  39. Human Rights: India and the West.Ashwani Kumar Peetush & Jay Drydyk (eds.) - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    The question of how to arrive at a consensus on human rights norm in a diverse, pluralistic, and interconnected global environment is critical. This volume is a contribution to an intercultural understanding of human rights in the context of India and its relationship to the West. The legitimacy of the global legal, economic, and political order is increasingly premised on the discourse of international human rights. Yet the United Nations’ Declaration of Human Rights developed with little or no consultation from (...)
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  40. The Thin Justice of International Law: A Moral Reckoning of the Law of Nations.Steven R. Ratner - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Offering a new interdisciplinary approach to global justice and integrating the insights of international relations and contemporary ethics, this book asks whether the core norms of international law are just by appraising them according to a standard of global justice grounded in the advancement of peace and protection of human rights.
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  41. Crime Against Dalits and Indigenous Peoples as an International Human Rights Issue.Desh Raj Sirswal - 2015 - In Proceedings of National Seminar on Human Rights of Marginalised Groups: Understanding and Rethinking Strategies. Patiala: pp. 214-225.
    In India, Dalits faced a centuries-old caste-based discrimination and nowadays indigenous people too are getting a threat from so called developed society. We can define these crimes with the term ‘atrocity’ means an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury. Caste-related violence has occurred and occurs in India in various forms. Though the Constitution of India has laid down certain safeguards to ensure welfare, protection and development, there is gross violation of their rights such as (...)
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  42. Adapting Food Production to Climate Change: An Inclusive Approach.Cristian Timmermann & Georges F. Félix - 2015 - Climate Change and Human Rights: The 2015 Paris Conference and the Task of Protecting People on a Warming Planet.
    On why agricultural innovation from the Global South can and should be used to adapt food production to climate change. Discussed on hand of three cases studies.
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  43. Climate Change, Human Rights and the Problem of Motivation.Michel Bourban - 2014 - De Ethica 1 (1):37-52.
    In this paper, I discuss some of the human rights that are threatened by the impact of global warming and the problem of motivation to comply with the duties of climate justice. I explain in what sense human rights can be violated by climate change and try to show that there are not only moral reasons to address this problem, but also more prudential motives, which I refer to as quasi-moral and non-moral reasons. I also assess some implications of potentially (...)
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  44. Human Rights, Climate Change and the Problem of Motivation.Michel Bourban - 2014 - De Ethica 1 (1):37-52.
    In this paper, I discuss some of the human rights that are threatened by the impact of global warming and the problem of motivation to comply with the duties of climate justice. I explain in what sense human rights can be violated by climate change and try to show that there are not only moral reasons to address this problem, but also more prudential motives, which I refer to as quasi-moral and non-moral reasons. I also assess some implications of potentially (...)
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  45. Globalization and Global Justice in Review.Nicole Hassoun - 2014 - Law, Ethics and Philosophy 2.
    Globalization connects everyone, from the world’s poorest slum dweller tothe richest billionaire. Globalization and Global Justice starts by giving a newargument for the conclusion that coercive international institutions —whosesubjects who are likely to face sanctions for violation of their rules— mustensure that everyone they coerce secures basic necessities like food, waterand medicines. It then suggests that it is possible for coercive institutionsto fulfill their obligations by, for instance, providing international aid andmaking free trade fair. This overview sketches the argument in (...)
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  46. Justice and Temporary Labor Migration.Matthew J. Lister - 2014 - Georgetown Immigration Law Review 29:95.
    Temporary labor migration programs have been among the most controversial topics in discussions of immigration reform. They have been opposed by many, perhaps most, academics writing on immigration, by immigration reform activists, and by organized labor. This opposition has not been without some good reasons, as many historical temporary labor migration programs have led to significant injustice and abuse. However, in this paper I argue that a well-crafted temporary labor migration program is both compatible with liberal principles of justice and (...)
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  47. Harmonizing Global Ethics in the Future: A Proposal to Add South and East to West.Thaddeus Metz - 2014 - Journal of Global Ethics 10 (2):146-155.
    This article considers how global ethical matters might be approached differently in the English-speaking literature if values salient in sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia were taken seriously. Specifically, after pointing out how indigenous values in both of these major parts of the world tend to prescribe honouring harmonious relationships, the article brings out what such an approach to morality entails for political power, foreign relations and criminal justice. For each major issue, it suggests that harmony likely has implications that differ (...)
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  48. Justice, Diversity, and Dialogue: Rawlsian Multiculturalism.Ashwani Kumar Peetush - 2014 - In S. Sikka & L. Beaman (eds.), Multiculturalism and Religious Identity: Canada and India. Montreal, QC, Canada: pp. 153-168.
    In this chapter, I argue that John Rawls’ later work presents one of the most fruitful liberal frameworks from which to approach global cultural diversity. In his Law of Peoples (1999), the normative architecture Rawls provides is much more open to an intercultural/religious dialogue with various non-Western communities, such as the First Nations, than are other liberal approaches. Surprisingly, this has gone unnoticed in the literature on multiculturalism. At the same time, Rawls’ framework is not problem free. Here, I am (...)
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  49. Limiting and Facilitating Access to Innovations in Medicine and Agriculture: A Brief Exposition of the Ethical Arguments.Cristian Timmermann - 2014 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 10 (1):1-20.
    Taking people’s longevity as a measure of good life, humankind can proudly say that the average person is living a much longer life than ever before. The AIDS epidemic has however for the first time in decades stalled and in some cases even reverted this trend in a number of countries. Climate change is increasingly becoming a major challenge for food security and we can anticipate that hunger caused by crop damages will become much more common. -/- Since many of (...)
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  50. The Force of the Claimability Objection to the Human Right to Subsistence.Jesse Tomalty - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):1-17.
    The claimability objection rejects the inclusion of a right to subsistence among human rights because the duties thought to correlate with this right are undirected, and thus it is not claimable. This objection is open to two replies: One denies that claimability is an existence condition on rights. The second suggests that the human right to subsistence actually is claimable. I argue that although neither reply succeeds on the conventional interpretation of the human right to subsistence, an alternative ‘practical’ interpretation (...)
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