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  1. Responses to Ryan, Fosl and Gautier: SKEPSIS Book Symposium on 'Recasting Hume and Early Modern Philosophy', by Paul Russell.Paul Russell - 2023 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 14 (26):121-139.
    In the replies to my critics that follow I offer a more detailed account of the specific papers that they discuss or examine. The papers that they are especially concerned with are: “The Material World and Natural Religion in Hume’s Treatise” (Ryan) [Essay 3], “Hume’s Skepticism and the Problem of Atheism” (Fosl) [Essay 12], and “Hume’s Philosophy of Irreligion and the Myth of British Empiricism (Gautier) [Essay 16].
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  2. A Companion to Hobbes.Marcus P. Adams (ed.) - 2021 - Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Offers comprehensive treatment of Thomas Hobbes’s thought, providing readers with different ways of understanding Hobbes as a systematic philosopher As one of the founders of modern political philosophy, Thomas Hobbes is best known for his ideas regarding the nature of legitimate government and the necessity of society submitting to the absolute authority of sovereign power. Yet Hobbes produced a wide range of writings, from translations of texts by Homer and Thucydides, to interpretations of Biblical books, to works devoted to geometry, (...)
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  3. Psychology and Obligation in Hobbes: The Case of “Ought Implies Can”.Paul Garofalo - 2021 - Hobbes Studies 34 (2):146-171.
    Many interpreters use Hobbes’s endorsement of “ought implies can” to justify treating Hobbes’s motivational psychology as an external constraint on his normative theory. These interpreters assume that, for Hobbes, something is “possible” for a person to do only if they can be motivated to do it, and so Hobbes’s psychological theory constrains what obligations people have. I argue this assumption about what is “possible” is false and so these arguments are unsound. Looking to Hobbes’s exchange with Bramhall on free will, (...)
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  4. Of Gods and Clocks: Free Will and Hobbes-Bramhall Debate.Paul Russell - 2021 - In Recasting Hume and Early Modern Philosophy: Selected Essays. New York, NY, USA: pp. 133-157.
    Contrary to John Bramhall and critics like him, Thomas Hobbes takes the view that no account of liberty or freedom can serve as the relevant basis on which to distinguish moral from nonmoral agents or explains the basis on which an agent becomes subject to law and liable to punishment. The correct compatibilist strategy rests, on Hobbes’s account, with a proper appreciation and description of the contractualist features that shape and structure the moral community. From this perspective human agents may (...)
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  5. O CONCEITO DE LIBERDADE SEGUNDO THOMAS HOBBES.Marcelo Martins Bueno - 2018 - Trama Interdisciplinar 9 (3):68-87.
  6. Liberté et nécessité chez Hobbes et ses contemporains. [REVIEW]Mario Donoso - 2014 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 31 (1):280-280.
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  7. Rationality and Freedom in Hobbes's Theory of Action.Laurens van Apeldoorn - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (5):603-621.
    SummaryThomas Hobbes's theory of action seems to give up on the idea that actions are ‘up to us’. Thomas Pink has argued that this counter-intuitive stance should be understood as the implication of his radical assault on the scholastic Aristotelian model of action. Hobbes rejects the existence of the immaterial soul. This means that he must also reject the existence of so-called elicited acts of the will, which form the primary locus of human agency. In this paper an alternative interpretation (...)
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  8. Potentia e potestas no Leviathan de Hobbes.Maria Isabel Limongi - 2013 - Doispontos 10 (1).
    In the Leviathan, power can be understood in two different senses, which are carefully discriminated in its Latin version by the use of the terms potentia and potestas to translate, depending on the context and the type of power concerned, the English power. Potentia and potestas, although types of power of a different nature – one, the physical power that bodies have to take effect on each other; the other, the juridical power, out of which legal effects as justice itself (...)
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  9. Hobbes e Bramhall: O Debate Acerca do Livre-Arbítrio.G. V. Luz - 2013 - Páginas de Filosofía 5 (2):59-67.
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  10. Hobbes, Signification, and Insignificant Names.Stewart Duncan - 2011 - Hobbes Studies 24 (2):158-178.
    The notion of signification is an important part of Hobbes's philosophy of language. It also has broader relevance, as Hobbes argues that key terms used by his opponents are insignificant. However Hobbes's talk about names' signification is puzzling, as he appears to have advocated conflicting views. This paper argues that Hobbes endorsed two different views of names' signification in two different contexts. When stating his theoretical views about signification, Hobbes claimed that names signify ideas. Elsewhere he talked as if words (...)
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  11. The Instability of Freedom as Noninterference: The Case of Isaiah Berlin.Philip Pettit - 2011 - Ethics 121 (4):693-716.
    In Hobbes, freedom of choice requires nonfrustration: the option you prefer must be accessible. In Berlin, it requires noninterference: every option, preferred or unpreferred, must be accessible—every door must be open. But Berlin’s argument against Hobbes suggests a parallel argument that freedom requires something stronger still: that each option be accessible and that no one have the power to block access; the doors should be open, and there should be no powerful doorkeepers. This is freedom as nondomination. The claim is (...)
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  12. Thomas Hobbes and the Ethics of Freedom.Thomas Pink - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):541 - 563.
    Abstract Freedom in the sense of free will is a multiway power to do any one of a number of things, leaving it up to us which one of a range of options by way of action we perform. What are the ethical implications of our possession of such a power? The paper examines the pre-Hobbesian scholastic view of writers such as Peter Lombard and Francisco Suárez: freedom as a multiway power is linked to the right to liberty understood as (...)
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  13. The Free Will Problem [Hobbes, Bramhall and Free Will].Paul Russell - 2011 - In Desmond M. Clarke & Catherine Wilson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Early Modern Europe. New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 424-444.
    This article examines the free will problem as it arises within Thomas Hobbes' naturalistic science of morals in early modern Europe. It explains that during this period, the problem of moral and legal responsibility became acute as mechanical philosophy was extended to human psychology and as a result human choices were explained in terms of desires and preferences rather than being represented as acts of an autonomous faculty. It describes how Hobbes changed the face of moral philosophy, through his Leviathan, (...)
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  14. As paixões naturais e as ações humanas voluntárias em Thomas Hobbes: The natural passions and voluntary human actions in Thomas Hobbes.Delmo Mattos da Silva - 2009 - Controvérsia 5 (2).
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  15. Hobbes, Bramhall and the Politics of Liberty and Necessity A Quarrel of the Civil War and Interregnum.James Harris - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (1):111-113.
  16. Liberdade e Livre-arbítrio em Hobbes.Yara Frateschi - 2007 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 17 (1).
    A partir da polêmica entre Hobbes e Bramhall acerca do livre-arbítrio, pretendo mostrar que o argumento de Hobbes que torna compatível a negação da liberdade da vontade com a responsabilização e justa punição dos pecadores é o mesmo argumento utilizado nas obras políticas para sustentar a justiça da lei positiva e da punição civil. Nos dois casos, Hobbes faz a justiça derivar do poder ? seja de Deus ou do soberano civil ? e ser por ele regulada. Analogamente ao Deus (...)
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  17. Thomas Hobbes: Causation, determinism, and their compatibility with freedom.Ted Honderich - 2006
    _What Thomas Hobbes has to say of the nature of causation itself in_ _Entire Causes_ _and Their Only Possible Effects_ _is carried further in the first of the two excerpts here_ _-- although not at its start. His second subject in this imperfectly sequential piece of_ _writing is determinism itself -- a deterministic philosophy of mind. In the mind, as_ _elsewhere, each event has a 'necessary cause' -- a cause that necessitates the event._ _His third subject in the first excerpt (...)
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  18. Necessitating Justice: Hobbes on Free Will and Punishment.Simon Kow - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (7):689-702.
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  19. Liberty, Rationality, and Agency in Hobbes’s Leviathan. [REVIEW]Gary B. Herbert - 2004 - International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):334-335.
  20. Michael Oakeshott as a critic of Hobbes's theory of the will.Patrick Riley - 2004 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 1.
    Michael Oakeshott as a Critic of Hobbes's Theory of the Will - ABSTRACT: Patrick Riley asks why the post-War Oakeshott stopped speaking of the incoherence of Hobbes’s philosophy of volition, as he had in his Hobbes studies before the War. One answer is that he became more and more sensitive to the necessity of counterbalancing the determinist reading of Hobbes, which tended to be dominant in the 1970s’ Hobbes studies. He cites the example of Thomas Spragens’s The Politics of Motion (...)
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  21. The sense of smell: Morality and rhetoric in the bramhall-Hobbes controversy.Tzachi Zamir - 2004 - Sophia 43 (2):49-61.
    Olfactoric imagery is abundantly employed in the Bramhall-Hobbes controversy. I survey some examples and then turn to the possible significance of this. I argue that by forcing Hobbes into the figurative exchange Bramhall scores points in terms of moving the controversy into ground that is not covered by the limited view of rationality that Hobbes is committed to according to his rhetoric (at least as Bramhall perceives it). Bramhall clearly wants to move from cool argument to a more affluent rhetorical (...)
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  22. Liberty, necessity, chance: The general theory of the event in Hobbes.Y. C. Zarka - 2004 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 59 (1):249-261.
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  23. The Will and Human Action: From Antiquity to the Present Day.Thomas Pink & Martin William Francis Stone (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    What is the will? And what is its relation to human action? Throughout history, philosophers have been fascinated by the idea of "the will": the source of the drive that motivates human beings to act. However, there has never been a clear consensus as to what the will is and how it relates to human action. Some philosophers have taken the will to be based firmly in reason and rational choice, and some have seen it as purely self-determined. Others have (...)
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  24. Les questions concernant la liberté, la nécessité et le hasard (controverse avec Bramhall, II) Thomas Hobbes Introduction, notes, glossaires et index par Luc Foisneau, traduction par Luc Foisneau et Florence Perronin Collection «Bibliothèque d'histoire de la philosophie» Paris, Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 1999, 457 p. [REVIEW]François Beets - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (2):389-.
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  25. Reply to William Dwyer: Compatibilism and Evolution.George Lyons - 2002 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 4 (1):205-213.
    George Lyons criticizes as essentially rationalistic both the Objectivist concept of free will in Tibor Machan's Initiative: Human Agency and Society, and William Dwyer 's determinism in the compatibilist tradition derived from Hobbes. He draws attention to the general problem of compatibilism in modern philosophy. He focuses on how such scientific theorists as Daniel C. Dennett have gone beyond the ideas of Hobbes, in considering the complexities of action in evolutionary processes discovered by Darwin.
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  26. On the unavoidability of actions: Quentin Skinner, Thomas Hobbes, and the modern doctrine of negative liberty.Matthew H. Kramer - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):315 – 330.
    During the past few decades, Quentin Skinner has been one of the most prominent critics of the ideas about negative liberty that have developed out of the writings of Isaiah Berlin. Among Skinner?s principal charges against the contemporary doctrine of negative liberty is the claim that the proponents of that doctrine have overlooked the putative fact that people can be made unfree to refrain from undertaking particular actions. In connection with this matter, Skinner contrasts the present-day theories with the prototypical (...)
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  27. Liberty, necessity and chance: Hobbes's general theory of events.Yves Charles Zarka - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):425 – 437.
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  28. HOBBES, Thomas, Les Questions concernant la liberté, la nécessité et le hasard (controverse avec Bramhall II)HOBBES, Thomas, Les Questions concernant la liberté, la nécessité et le hasard (controverse avec Bramhall II).Syliane Charles - 2000 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 56 (2):387-390.
  29. Hobbes's Theory of Will: Ideological Reasons and Historical Circumstances.Jürgen Overhoff - 2000 - Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In Hobbes's Theory of the Will, Jurgen Overhoff reveals the religious, ethical, and political consequences of Thomas Hobbes's doctrine of volition. The author gracefully describes how Hobbes's thought was governed by assumptions based firmly in Galilean natural philosophy and orthodox Protestant theology. Overhoff also demonstrates how his subject used materialist eschatology and an absolutist political theory to resolve the social and ethical predicaments that coincided with these assumptions. Finally, Overhoff provides a chronological study of the numerous philosophical, theological, religious and (...)
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  30. Hobbes's theory of the will: ideological reasons and historical circumstances.Jürgen Overhoff - 2000 - Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield.
    In Hobbes's Theory of the Will, Jurgen Overhoff reveals the religious, ethical, and political consequences of Thomas Hobbes's doctrine of volition.
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  31. A Defense of True Liberty.John Bramhall - 1999 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
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  32. Bramhall's discourse of liberty and necessity.John Bramhall - 1999 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity. Cambridge University Press. pp. 1--14.
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  33. Discourse of Liberty and Necessity.John Bramhall - 1999 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
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  34. Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity.Vere Chappell (ed.) - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    Do human beings ever act freely, and if so what does freedom mean? Is everything that happens antecedently caused, and if so how is freedom possible? Is it right, even for God, to punish people for things that they cannot help doing? This volume presents the famous seventeenth-century controversy in which Thomas Hobbes and John Bramhall debate these questions and others. The complete texts of their initial contributions to the debate are included, together with selections from their subsequent replies to (...)
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  35. Treatise: Of liberty and necessity.Thomas Hobbes - 1999 - In Vere Chappell (ed.), Hobbes and Bramhall on Liberty and Necessity. Cambridge University Press.
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  36. Œuvres Xi-2 les Questions Concernant la Liberté, la Nécessité Et le Hasard.Thomas Hobbes - 1999 - Vrin.
    Dans la longue et passionnante controverse qui opposa Thomas Hobbes à John Bramhall, cet ouvrage, pour la première fois traduit en français dans son intégralité, apparaît comme l’élément le plus important. La question principale est la suivante : il s’agit de savoir s’il existe ou non un seul acte libre dans le monde. La fidélité aux arguments classiques en faveur de la nécessité, et particulièrement aux arguments stoïciens, constitue l’une des spécificités du nécessitarisme de Hobbes. D’autre part, la formulation médiévale (...)
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  37. Les questions concernant la liberté, la nécessité et le hasard (controverse avec Bramhall, II).THOMAS HOBBES - 1999
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  38. Determinism and Human Freedom.Robert Sleigh Jr, Vere Chappell & Michael Della Rocca - 1998 - In Daniel Garber & Michael Ayers (eds.), The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 1195–1278.
  39. Liberty Worth the Name: Beyond Hobbesean Compatibilism.Gideon Daniel Yaffe - 1998 - Dissertation, Stanford University
    Hobbes believed there was nothing more to freedom than the ability to do as we choose. According to this view, freedom is undermined only by ropes and chains, those features of our circumstances that prevent the realization of choices. Such views have been criticized on the grounds that freedom can be undermined also by forces that perniciously influence what we choose. Indoctrination, coercion and psychological disorders such as addiction and compulsion detract from freedom by influencing what we will rather than (...)
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  40. Freedom as Motion.Leslie D. Feldman - 1997 - Journal of Philosophical Research 22:229-243.
    Central to the argument of this article is the sense in which Thomas Hobbes and liberals see freedom as centered around the notion of free movement. Hobbes, in chapter 21 of Leviathan, describes freedom as “the absence of opposition” to motion. This work argues that the Hobbesian view of freedom as motion was taken up by liberalism as its hallmark and flourished most of all in America where emphasis on individualism was greatest. In America, movement coupled with individualism to create (...)
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  41. Hobbes, Th.: "Libertad y necesidad y otros escritos".E. Bello - 1995 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 10:161.
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  42. Hobbes on Liberty and Necessity.Margarita Costa - 1993 - Hobbes Studies 6 (1):29-42.
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  43. T. HOBBES, "Über die Freiheit".R. Rossi - 1990 - Filosofia Oggi 13 (2):332.
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  44. Causation, compulsion, and compatibilism.Paul Russell - 1988 - American Philosophical Quarterly 25 (4):313-321.
    The empiricist-compatibilist strategy falls, essentially, into two distinct stages of argument. Historically speaking, the first stage was initiated by Hobbes and the second stage was initiated by Hume. The first stage, which I shall refer to as the "compulsion argument" seeks to describe the general significance of the distinction between causation and compulsion for the "free will" dispute. The second stage of the empiricist-compatibilist strategy, which I shall refer to as the "regularity argument," endeavours to reconstruct the compulsion argument on (...)
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  45. The Determinants of Choice.Maurice Mandelbaum - 1985 - Philosophy Research Archives 11:355-378.
    This paper assumes that human choices are determined, and distinguishes among the views of some classical modern philosophers regarding what determines choice.Hobbes and Hume are taken as representatives of choice as determined by subjective propensities; the differences between their views is discussed. Descartes is taken as a major representative of the view that choice is determined by an apprehension of that which is objectively good, and Spinoza, Malebranche, and Leibniz are discussed insofar as they share that view. It is then (...)
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  46. La nozione di libertà nell'opera di Thomas Hobbes.Maria Emanuela Scribano - 1980 - Rivista di Filosofia 16:30.
  47. Hobbes as Reformation Theologian: Implications of the Free-Will Controversy.Leopold Damrosch - 1979 - Journal of the History of Ideas 40 (3):339.
  48. Thomas Hobbes and the debate on free will. His present-day significance for ethical theory.Hugo van den Enden - 1979 - Philosophica 24 (2):185-216.
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  49. Determinism and freewill: Anthony Collins' A philosophical inquiry concerning human liberty: with a discussion of the opinions of Hobbes, Locke, Pierre Bayle, William King and Leibniz.Anthony Collins - 1976 - The Hague: M. Nijhoff. Edited by James O'Higgins.
  50. "The Classical Mind," by W. T. Jones; "The Medieval Mind," by W. T. Jones; "Hobbes to Hume," by W. T. Jones; and "Kant to Wittgenstein and Sartre," by W. T. Jones. [REVIEW]M. Joseph Costelloe - 1970 - Modern Schoolman 48 (1):99-100.
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