Historical Linguistics

Edited by Claudia Meadows (University of Houston-Downtown, University of Houston, Clear Lake)
About this topic
Summary Languages change all the time and let us wonder about our ancestors communicating with another. Would we still understand them today? For example, Koine Greek in Hellenistic Greece is different than Classical Greek which was used in Plato’s philosophical works. Both language variations  have composition changes compare to Modern Greek. Even that Koine Greek is much closer to Modern Greek than Classical because it was also the language of the common man. The Bible was written in Koine, and the language of the Christian scriptures fascinates historians and theologians in the same measures today.
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  1. La Hélade traducida: Grecia desde la mirada de la antigua Roma y la traductología moderna.Álvaro Salazar - 2022 - In Ana Francisca Viveros (ed.), Acta de la IV Jornada de Humanidades. pp. 139-162.
    El presente escrito pretende ser una mirada a algunas visiones —antiguas y contemporáneas— en torno al modo en que los traductores reflexionan y enfrentan las traslaciones de la literatura clásica griega. De esta manera, estos pensamientos y proyecciones van desde los primeros escritos sobre la traducción con autores como Livio Andrónico, Cicerón o San Jerónimo, hasta traductores o traductólogos contemporáneos como Nord o Grammatico, quienes tienen en común la labor de traernos los textos clásicos —escritos en lengua griega— de Homero, (...)
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  2. The Verbal Aspect Integral to the Perfect and Pluperfect Tense-forms in the Pauline Corpus: A Semantic and Pragmatic Analysis.James Sedlacek - 2022 - 2542 Pieterlen, Switzerland: Peter Lang.
    This book argues that the verbal aspect of the Greek Perfect is complex, involving not one but two aspects, where the perfective applies to events and the imperfective applies to states. These two aspects are connected to specific morphemes in the Perfect tense-form. This study analyses Perfect tense-forms in discursive text by focusing on the Pauline Corpus. The method is grounded in grammaticalisation studies and informed by morphology, comparative linguistics, and historical linguistics. The argument is further supported by a corpus-based (...)
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  3. El quechua en el bicentenario: ¿una lengua en proceso de exintición?Luis Felipe Bartolo Alegre - 2021 - Historia y Región 9 (9):59-96.
    In this paper we will review the history of Quechua in the Peruvian territory (including the eras of the Inca empire, the viceroyalty, and the republic) and consider the challenges it faces in order to survive from the bicentenary of our republic onwards. I begin by showing that most varieties of Quechua are in a process of extinction and reflect on the causes that may have determined this trend in the republican era. I defend the thesis that it was the (...)
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  4. Chomsky's Influence on Historical Linguistics: From Universal Grammar to Third Factors.Elly Gelderen - 2021 - In Nicholas Allott, Terje Lohndal & Georges Rey (eds.), A Companion to Chomsky. Wiley. pp. 210–221.
    This chapter is concerned with Noam Chomsky's influence on historical linguistics, one might also ask about the influence of historical linguistics on Chomskyan thought. It outlines the tension between Chomskyan generative grammar and historical linguistics and argues how both have been beneficial to each other. Generative grammar and historical linguistics can benefit from each other's insights. The chapter explains how there is a great deal of influence of Chomskyan, generative linguistics on historical linguistics, in particular syntax, and also shows how (...)
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  5. Topology of Balasaguni's Kutadgu Bilig. Thinking the Between.Onur Karamercan - 2021 - In Takeshi Morisato & Roman Pașca (eds.), Vanishing Subjectivity: Flower, Shame, and Direct Cultivation in Asian PhilosophiesAsian Philosophical Texts, no. 3. pp. 69-97.
    In “Topology of Balasaguni’s Kutadgu Bilig: Thinking the Between,” Onur Karamercan focuses on the philosophical dimension of Kutadgu Bilig, a poetic work of Yūsuf Balasaguni, an 11th century Central Asian thinker, poet, and statesman. Karamercan pays special attention to the meaning of betweenness and, in the first step of his argument, discusses the hermeneutic and topological implications of the between, distingushing the dynamic sense of betweenness from a static sense of in-betweenness. He then moves on to analyze Balasaguni’s notion of (...)
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  6. THE CHANGE OF SOME GRAMMATICAL CAGETORIES IN TURKISH:WORDS WITH ADVERBIAL FUNCTIONS.Emin Yas - 2021 - Andquot;, Pamukkale Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü Dergisi 43 (2021):163 - 178.
    It is known that Turkish, like all languages, has changed and is in a process of change. The direction of the change in question is both from verbal language to written language and from written language to verbal language. Changes are studied in linguistics by two different types of research approaches, namely diachronic and synchronic. This qualitative study using the quantitative data collection tool focused on the phenomenon of synchronic change. The aim of this descriptive study is to reveal to (...)
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  7. The Case Against Linguistic Palaeontology.Fintan Mallory - 2020 - Topoi 40 (1):273-284.
    The method of linguistic palaeontology has a controversial status within archaeology. According to its defenders, it promises the ability to see into the social and material cultures of prehistoric societies and uncover facts about peoples beyond the reach of archaeology. Its critics see it as essentially flawed and unscientific. Using a particular case-study, the Indo-European homeland problem, this paper attempts to discern the kinds of inference which proponents of linguistic palaeontology make and whether they can be warranted. I conclude that, (...)
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  8. The global lexicostatistical database: A total archive of linguistic prehistory.Judith R. H. Kaplan - 2018 - History of the Human Sciences 31 (5):106-128.
    Described as a ‘sort of Human Genome Project for historical linguistics’, the Evolution of Human Languages Project (EHL) is dedicated to promoting long-range genealogical research into linguistic prehistory. Toward that end, its architects have sought to collect and coordinate evidence of every known human language, roughly 6000 in all, fostering an interdisciplinary and internationally accessible environment for the study of historical universals and contemporary diversity. This article investigates the roots and branches of the Global Lexicostatistical Database – a component project (...)
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  9. Cladistic Parsimony, Historical Linguistics and Cultural Phylogenetics.Frank Cabrera - 2017 - Mind and Language 32 (1):65-100.
    Here, I consider the recent application of phylogenetic methods in historical linguistics. After a preliminary survey of one such method, i.e. cladistic parsimony, I respond to two common criticisms of cultural phylogenies: that cultural artifacts cannot be modeled as tree-like because of borrowing across lineages, and that the mechanism of cultural change differs radically from that of biological evolution. I argue that while perhaps remains true for certain cultural artifacts, the nature of language may be such as to side-step this (...)
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  10. Modes of Thinking and Language Change: The Loss of Inflexions in Old English.Jesús Gerardo Martínez del Castillo - 2015 - International Journal of Language and Linguistics 3 (6-1):85-95.
    The changes known as the loss of inflexions in English (11th- 15th centuries, included) were prompted with the introduction of a new mode of thinking. The mode of thinking, for the Anglo-Saxons, was a dynamic way of conceiving of things. Things were considered events happening. With the contacts of Anglo-Saxons with, first, the Romano-British; second, the introduction of Christianity; and finally with the Norman invasion, their dynamic way of thinking was confronted with the static conception of things coming from the (...)
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  11. Language death and diversity: philosophical and linguistic implications.Lajos L. Brons - 2014 - The Science of Mind 52:243-260.
    This paper presents a simple model to estimate the number of languages that existed throughout history, and considers philosophical and linguistic implications of the findings. The estimated number is 150,000 plus or minus 50,000. Because only few of those remain, and there is no reason to believe that that remainder is a statistically representative sample, we should be very cautious about universalistic claims based on existing linguistic variation.
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  12. 5. “The Similarity of Structure Which Pervades All Languages”: From Philology to Linguistics, 1800–1850.James Turner - 2014 - In Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities. Princeton University Press. pp. 123-146.
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  13. Variety in Ancient Greek aspect interpretation.Corien Bary & Markus Egg - 2012 - Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (2):111-134.
    The wide range of interpretations of aoristic and imperfective aspect in Ancient Greek cannot be attributed to unambiguous aspectual operators but suggest an analysis in terms of coercion in the spirit of de Swart (Nat Lang Linguist Theory 16:347–385, 1998). But since such an analysis cannot explain the Ancient Greek data, we combine Klein’s (Time in language, 1994) theory of tense and aspect with Egg’s (Flexible semantics for reinterpretation phenomena, 2005) aspectual coercion approach. Following Klein. (grammatical) aspect relates the runtime (...)
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  14. “natural Constructivism”: Old Wine In A New Bottle? Review Of “human Language And Objective Reality” By William Cameron. [REVIEW]Ivan Bolognesi - 2009 - Constructivist Foundations 5 (1):66-67.
    A “natural constructivist” attempt to explain the practice of knowing and other mental talk by showing how these practices have “naturally” emerged, where this natural emergence is in a realist home rather than a constructivist one.
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  15. The Dhivehi Language: A Descriptive and Historical Grammar of Dhivehi and Its Dialects. 2 Vols.James W. Gair - 2007 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 127 (3):365.
  16. Fortson IV Indo-European Language and Culture. An Introduction. Pp. xviii + 468, maps. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. Cased, £65 . ISBN: 1-4051-0315-9. [REVIEW]James Clackson - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):89-90.
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  17. Indo-European Language and Culture. An Introduction. [REVIEW]James Clackson - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):89-90.
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  18. Nietzsche et la métaphore cognitive.Ignace Haaz - 2006 - Dissertation, Geneva (Switzerland)
    F. Nietzsche does interesting indications on the anthropological foundation of language in his lessons on classical rhetoric, at the University of Basel in 1874. Many quotations of Gerber and Humboldt, and older notions, drawn from the Aristotle's Rhetoric are discussed in this dissertation. Many studies highlighted Nietzsche's attempts during thirty years (1976-2006) to draw a consistent anthropological foundation of the language. Some of them shed light on the metaphor, described from the point of view of anthropology, as an innovative perspective (...)
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  19. Trees of History in Systematics, Historical Linguistics, and Stemmatics: A Working Interdisciplinary Bibliography.Robert J. O'Hara - 2006 - SSRN Electronic Journal 2540351.
    138 titles across a wide range of scholarly publications illustrate the conceptual affinities that connect the palaetiological sciences of biological systematics, historical linguistics, and stemmatics. These three fields all have as their central objective the reconstruction of evolutionary "trees of history" that depict phylogenetic patterns of descent with modification among species, languages, and manuscripts. All three fields flourished in the nineteenth century, underwent parallel periods of quiescence in the early twentieth century, and in recent decades have seen widespread parallel revivals. (...)
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  20. Parry in Paris: Structuralism, Historical Linguistics, and the Oral Theory.Thérèse Vedet - 2005 - Classical Antiquity 24 (2):257-284.
    This paper investigates the origins of the Oral Theory as formulated by Milman Parry in Paris during the late 1920s by reexamining the scholarship on which it rests. Parry's Oral Theory compared the texts of oral performances in Yugoslavia with the Homeric texts in order to shed light on the presumed oral origins of the latter. His work integrated the work of the linguist and Indo-Europeanist Antoine Meillet, the linguist and scholar of oral poetics Matthias Murko, and the anthropologists Lucien (...)
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  21. The Onomastic Evidence for Bronze-Age West Semitic.M. O'Connor - 2004 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 124 (3):439-470.
  22. For lexical semantic change.Andreas Blank - 1999 - In Andreas Blank & Peter Koch (eds.), Historical semantics and cognition. New York: Mouton de Gruyter. pp. 13--61.
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  23. Exactness and pseudoexactness in historical linguistics.Christopher Hitchcock - 1999 - Topoi 18 (2):127-139.
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  24. Cædmon's Conjunction: Cædmon's Hymn 7a Revisited.Mary Blockley - 1998 - Speculum 73 (1):1-31.
    Bruce Mitchell has observed that “It is not always possible to say with certainty whether clauses introduced by words such as þœr, þa, and þonne are principal or subordinate. The problem arises more often in the poetry, where the element order is a less certain guide than it is in the prose.” In prose the feature of the element order that usually sorts out clause-initial adverbs from conjunctions is the position of the finite verb. When the finite verb immediately follows (...)
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  25. The common cause principle in historical linguistics.Christopher Hitchcock - 1998 - Philosophy of Science 65 (3):425-447.
    Despite the platitude that analytic philosophy is deeply concerned with language, philosophers of science have paid little attention to methodological issues that arise within historical linguistics. I broach this topic by arguing that many inferences in historical linguistics conform to Reichenbach's common cause principle (CCP). Although the scope of CCP is narrower than many have thought, inferences about the genealogies of languages are particularly apt for reconstruction using CCP. Quantitative approaches to language comparison are readily understood as methods for detecting (...)
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  26. Trees of history in systematics and philology.Robert J. O'Hara - 1996 - Memorie Della Società Italiana di Scienze Naturali E Del Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Milano 27 (1): 81–88.
    "The Natural System" is the name given to the underlying arrangement present in the diversity of life. Unlike a classification, which is made up of classes and members, a system or arrangement is an integrated whole made up of connected parts. In the pre-evolutionary period a variety of forms were proposed for the Natural System, including maps, circles, stars, and abstract multidimensional objects. The trees sketched by Darwin in the 1830s should probably be considered the first genuine evolutionary diagrams of (...)
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  27. Indian mind through the ages: a select annotated bibliography of periodical literature, 1951-1966, on Indian philosophy, religion, literature, and linguistics from the post-Vedic to the pre-Kalidasa era.Pratibha Biswas - 1995 - Calcutta: Bharati Book Stall.
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  28. Latin Linguistics Robert Coleman (ed.): New Studies in Latin Linguistics. Selected Papers from the 4th International Colloquium on Latin Linguistics, Cambridge, April 1992. (Studies in Language Companion Series, 21.) Pp. x + 478. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1991. fl. 250/$132.00. [REVIEW]Gillian R. Hart - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (02):353-355.
  29. Compositional Background of the Epidaurian'Iamata.Lynn R. LiDonnici - 1992 - American Journal of Philology 113 (1).
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  30. Old English Meter and Linguistic Theory.Geoffrey Russom. [REVIEW]Peter S. Baker - 1990 - Speculum 65 (2):490-491.
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  31. Falsification and falsifiability in historical linguistics.Pedro Beade - 1989 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (2):173-181.
  32. Pāṇini on Linguistic DescriptionPanini on Linguistic Description.R. K. Sharma - 1989 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 109 (4):635.
  33. Language Systems and Principles of Reconstruction in Linguistics.T. V. Gamkrelidze & V. V. Ivanov - 1987 - Diogenes 35 (137):1-25.
    Two levels can be distinguished in the structure of a language as a system of signs: the level of expression and the level of contents. Every sign of a language will thus be characterized by the unity of these two aspects. We can distinguish therein the signifying (.signans) and the signified (signatum), which correspond to the two levels of the language. Relations between the signifying and the signified in linguistic signs are determined by the relationship between their content and their (...)
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  34. The Emergence of Philological Discourse in the German States, 1770-1810.Robert Leventhal - 1986 - Isis 77:243-260.
  35. Empiricism and linguistics in eighteenth-century great Britain.Patrice Bergheaud - 1985 - Topoi 4 (2):155-163.
    This paper aims at specifying the complex links which two major and polemically related 18th-century linguistic theories James Harris' universal grammar in Hermes (1751) and John Horne Tooke's system of etymology in the Diversions of Purley (1786, 1804) bear to empiricism. It describes both the ideologicalethical determining factors of the theories and the epistemological consequences dependent upon their respective philosophical orientation (Harris using classical Greek philosophy against empiricism, Tooke criticizing Locke's semantics along Hobbesian lines). The effects within the linguistic theories (...)
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  36. Ontology and explanation in historical linguistics.Fred D'Agostino - 1985 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (2):147-165.
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  37. Abhiprāya and implication in tibetan linguistics.Michael M. Broido - 1984 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 12 (1):1-33.
  38. Christian Latin. [REVIEW]L. A. Holford-Strevens - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (2):230-233.
  39. Modern Greek Evidence for the Ancient Greek Vocabulary. [REVIEW]A. C. Moorhouse - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (2):307-308.
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  40. Histoire de la langue grecque. [REVIEW]A. Morpurgo Davies - 1975 - The Classical Review 25 (1):153-154.
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  41. Studies in Formal Historical Linguistics.Henry M. Hoenigswald - 1974 - Foundations of Language 12 (1):147-148.
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  42. An Introduction to Historical and Comparative Linguistics.[author unknown] - 1974 - Foundations of Language 11 (4):575-582.
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  43. Zur Entstehung der neugriechischen Substantivdeklination. [REVIEW]Robert Browning - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (1):125-126.
  44. Istoria limbii rom'ne. [REVIEW]Robert Browning - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (1):128-129.
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  45. Generative Grammatical Studies in the Old English Language.Karl Heinz Wagner - 1972 - Foundations of Language 8 (3):449-455.
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  46. Logical Second Intentions: Late Scholastic Theories of Higher Level Predicates.Larry Allen Hickman - 1971 - Dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin
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  47. Van de saussure tot Chomsky: Een linguistische situatiebepaling Van het structuralisme.H. Berger - 1970 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 32 (2):175 - 196.
    Several representatives of structuralism relate the concept of structure to the langue of Ferdinand de Saussure. And so a linguistic approximation to structuralism seems possible. Such an approximation makes sense for another reason : because of the growing importance of transformational linguistics and the criticism of structuralism expressed by Noam Chomsky. In this article the main ideas of de Saussure and Chomsky are analysed, resulting in the confrontation of langue (de Saussure) and competence (Chomsky). Chomsky's criticism of langue as "a (...)
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  48. The Neuter Plural of Hittite i- and u- Stems.Paul W. Brosman - 1964 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 84 (4):344-348.
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  49. The Development of the Consonantal System in the Greek Dialects. [REVIEW]D. M. Jones - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (2):175-177.
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  50. Pronouns of address in the Canterbury Tales.Norman Nathan - 1959 - Mediaeval Studies 21 (1):193-201.
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