About this topic
Summary Henry Sidgwick (1838-1900) is widely regarded as the most enduringly significant figure in late 19th century Anglo-American moral philosophy. He is both the last of the three classical utilitarians (Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick) and the first in a tradition of British intuitionists stretching into the mid 20th century and including Moore and Ross. His works include books on political philosophy, political history, and economics, and articles on issues in epistemology and general philosophy. But by far his most discussed work in his masterpiece, The Methods of Ethics (first edition 1874, 7th (posthumous) edition 1907).
Key works For the student of ethics, Sidgwick's own most important works are The Methods of Ethics (Sidgwick 1907); Lectures on the Ethics of T.H. Green, Mr. Herbert Spencer, and J. Martineau (Sidgwick 1902) and Essays on Ethics and Method (Sidgwick 2000). Important secondary sources include C.D. Broad, Five Types of Ethical Theory (Broad 1959); Jerome Schneewind, Sidgwick's Ethics and Victorian Moral Philosophy (Schneewind 1977); Robert Shaver, Rational Egoism (Shaver 1998);  Bart Schultz, Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe (Schultz 2004); Terence Irwin, The Development of Ethics, Vol. III (Irwin 2009); and David Phillips, Sidgwickian Ethics (Phillips 2011).
Introductions The best introductions to Sidgwick's work are probably his own in the "short intellectual autobiography" included by his literary executor, E.E. Constance Jones, in the Preface to the 6th edition of the Methods (Sidgwick 1907, xvii-xxiii) and Bart Schultz's Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy article "Henry Sidgwick".
Related categories

388 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 388
  1. The descriptivist theory of names and the problem of paradoxical reputations.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This paper presents an objection to the theory of names according to which what a name refers to is determined by a description that the speaker or writer associates with that name. Some names are associated with paradoxical descriptions. I use the reputations of Henry Sidgwick and J.M.E. McTaggart to illustrate this problem.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. What “everyone” needs to know? Sidgwick and Hart against the priority of liberty.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This is a one page handout, which draws attention to subtle adaptations that H.L.A. Hart makes regarding material from Henry Sidgwick, when he debates with Rawls and appeals to Sidgwick's objections to the priority of liberty. These adaptations challenge the impression that Rawls should have known better.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Another objection from Sidgwick to Rawls’s liberty principle, and a response.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    There are other problems for John Rawls’s philosophy that can be extracted from Henry Sidgwick’s discussion of the priority of freedom, apart from the problem H.L.A. Hart focuses on. This paper considers one such problem – that it is an empirical issue whether a sane adult is better off more free, rather than something to be assumed – and presents one Rawlsian solution.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Henry Sidgwick on freedom as the formula for justice.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This is a two page handout, briefly summarizing late nineteenth and early twentieth century philosopher Henry Sidgwick's objections to giving all citizens a right to as much equal freedom as possible. H.L.A. Hart, who uses the material in a notable paper, also figures.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Review: Henry S. [REVIEW]Alex John London - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. John Stuart Mill’s view on democracy and government in Gregory Conti’s Parliament the Mirror of the Nation.Helen McCabe - forthcoming - History of European Ideas:1-3.
  7. The Golden Rule: A Naturalistic Perspective.Nathan Cofnas - 2022 - Utilitas 34 (3):262-274.
    A number of philosophers from Hobbes to Mill to Parfit have held some combination of the following views about the Golden Rule: (a) It is the cornerstone of morality across many if not all cultures. (b) It affirms the value of moral impartiality, and potentially the core idea of utilitarianism. (c) It is immune from evolutionary debunking, that is, there is no good naturalistic explanation for widespread acceptance of the Golden Rule, ergo the best explanation for its appearance in different (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Role of Kant in Sidgwick’s Classical Utilitarianism: Two Self-Evident Axioms and the Partial Convergence between Kantianism and Utilitarianism.Annette Dufner - 2022 - Kantian Review 27 (3):345-362.
    Among the most surprising claims in The Methods of Ethics is Sidgwick’s assertion that his key ethical axioms are corroborated by Kant. This article analyses Sidgwick’s claim that his axioms of justice and benevolence closely correspond to particular features in Kant. I shall argue that his claim of agreement with Kant was a serious overstatement. In particular, the restrictions which Sidgwick places on his acceptance of Kant’s universal law formula of the categorical imperative (FUL) seem to call into question whether (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Reseña de Lazari-Radek, Katarzyna; Singer, Peter. The point of view of the universe: Sidgwick and contemporary ethics, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2014.José Ramón Curbera Luis - 2022 - Dilemata 37:73-74.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Sidgwick's the Methods of Ethics: A Guide.David Phillips - 2022 - Oxford University Press.
    Author David Phillips has produced a clear, concise guide to Henry Sidgwick's masterpiece of classical utilitarian thought, The Methods of Ethics, setting it in its intellectual and cultural context while drawing out its main insights into a variety of fields.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Review of David Phillips, Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics: A Guide. [REVIEW]Anthony Skelton - 2022 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    This is a review of David Phillips, Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics: A Guide.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. On the ethics of naturalism: Sorley and Sidgwick on ethics and evolution.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2021 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 29 (6):1144-1165.
    This paper addresses the question of the ethical significance of the theory of evolution in W. R. Sorley’s The Ethics of Naturalism. Sorley’s treatment is compa...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Sidgwick and Rawls on distributive justice and desert.David Miller - 2021 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 20 (4):385-408.
    This article explores, comparatively and critically, Sidgwick’s and Rawls’s reasons for rejecting desert as a principle of distributive justice. Their ethical methods, though not identical, each re...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Sidgwick, Reflective Equilibrium and the Triviality Charge.Michael W. Schmidt - 2021 - In Michael Schefczyk & Christoph Schmidt-Petri (eds.), Utility, Progress, and Technology: Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the International Society for Utilitarian Studies. Karlsruhe, Deutschland: pp. 247-258.
    I argue against the claim that it is trivial to state that Sidgwick used the method of wide reflective equilibrium. This claim is based on what could be called the Triviality Charge, which is pressed against the method of wide reflective equilibrium by Peter Singer. According to this charge, there is no alternative to using the method if it is interpreted as involving all relevant philosophical background arguments. The main argument against the Triviality Charge is that although the method of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Beneficent Governor of the Cosmos: Kant and Sidgwick on the Moral Necessity of God.Tyler Paytas - 2020 - In Kantian and Sidgwickian Ethics: The Cosmos of Duty Above and the Moral Law Within. Routledge. pp. 210-244.
    Kant and Sidgwick agree that genuine ethical principles must be sourced in reason rather than divine commands. Yet, despite sharing this secular starting point, both philosophers ultimately conclude that the assumption of God’s existence is necessary for the complete viability of practical reason (including principles of morality) within human beings. This mutual reintroduction of God is especially surprising given that Kant and Sidgwick advocate divergent moral theories. The central claim of this chapter is that, despite their philosophical differences, Kant’s and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Kantian and Sidgwickian Ethics: The Cosmos of Duty Above and the Moral Law Within.Tyler Paytas & Tim Henning (eds.) - 2020 - New York and London: Routledge.
    Immanuel Kant and Henry Sidgwick are towering figures in the history of moral philosophy. Kant's views on ethics continue to be discussed and studied in detail not only in philosophy, but also theology, political science, and legal theory. Meanwhile, Sidgwick is emerging as the philosopher within the utilitarian tradition who merits the same meticulous treatment that Kant receives. As champions of deontology and consequentialism respectively, Kant and Sidgwick disagree on many important issues. However, close examination reveals a surprising amount of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Philosophical Biography of the Utilitarian Tradition: Is Sidgwick a Point of Culmination?Christian Seidel - 2020 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 74 (1):124-140.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Practical Ethics in Sidgwick and Kant.Anthony Skelton - 2020 - In Tyler Paytas & Tim Henning (eds.), Kantian and Sidgwickian Ethics: The Cosmos of Duty Above and the Moral Law Within. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 13-39.
    Sidgwick claimed Kant as one of his moral philosophical masters. This did not prevent Sidgwick from registering pointed criticisms of most of Kant’s main claims in ethics. This paper explores the practical ethics of Sidgwick and Kant. In § I, I outline the element of Kant’s theoretical ethics that Sidgwick endorsed. In §§ II and III, I outline and adjudicate some of their sharpest disagreements in practical ethics, on the permissibility of lying and on the demands of beneficence. In § (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Late Utilitarian Moral Theory and Its Development: Sidgwick, Moore.Anthony Skelton - 2019 - In J. A. Shand (ed.), A Companion to Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 281-310.
    Henry Sidgwick taught G.E. Moore as an undergraduate at the University of Cambridge. Moore found Sidgwick’s personality less than attractive and his lectures “rather dull”. Still, philosophically speaking, Moore absorbed a great deal from Sidgwick. In the Preface to the Trinity College Prize Fellowship dissertation that he submitted in 1898, just two years after graduation, he wrote “For my ethical views it will be obvious how much I owe to Prof. Sidgwick.” Later, in Principia Ethica, Moore credited Sidgwick with having (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Review of J. B. Schneewind, Essays on the History of Moral Philosophy[REVIEW]Anthony Skelton - 2017 - Mind 126 (503):949-954.
  21. Rashdall, Hastings (1858-1924).Anthony Skelton - 2016 [2013] - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 4325-4329.
    An opinionated encyclopedia entry on Hastings Rashdall, in which several worries about his case for ideal utilitarianism are raised.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Rawls on Kantian Constructivism.Nathaniel Jezzi - 2016 - Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 4 (8).
    John Rawls’s 1980 Dewey Lectures are widely acknowledged to represent the locus classicus for contemporary discussions of moral constructivism. Nevertheless, few published works have engaged with the significant interpretive challenges one finds in these lectures, and those that have fail to offer a satisfactory reading of the view that Rawls presents there or the place the lectures occupy in the development of Rawls's thinking. Indeed, there is a surprising lack of consensus about how best to interpret the constructivism of these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Point of View of the Universe, by Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer. [REVIEW]David Phillips - 2016 - Mind 125 (497):244-248.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Cosmos of Duty: Henry Sidgwick’s Methods of Ethics by Roger Crisp.Bart Schultz - 2016 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (3):510-511.
    The career of Oxford philosopher Roger Crisp has produced a wonderfully rich yield of elegant, lucid philosophizing that combines in a rare mix historical erudition and brilliant, creative, and highly interdisciplinary ethical argument. Crisp is steeped in Aristotle and Mill, W. D. Ross and Derek Parfit, but his deepest source of inspiration is by his own admission the Victorian era Cambridge philosopher Henry Sidgwick, author of the famous Methods of Ethics. Although Sidgwick has been regarded as a kind of master (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. British Ethical Theorists from Sidgwick to Ewing, by Hurka, Thomas: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014, pp. xiv+ 310, £30.Bart Schultz - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):611-614.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Sidgwick on Pleasure.Robert Shaver - 2016 - Ethics 126 (4):901-928.
  27. Der Utilitarismus und die deutsche Philosophie: Texte zur Ethik und Philosophiegeschichte.Henry Sidgwick - 2016 - Hamburg: Felix Meiner Verlag.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. The cosmos of duty - Henry sidgwick’s methods of ethics.Roger Crisp - 2015 - Oxford: Oxford University Press UK.
    Roger Crisp presents a comprehensive study of Henry Sidgwick's The Methods of Ethics, a landmark work first published in 1874. Crisp argues that Sidgwick is largely right about many central issues in moral philosophy: the metaphysics and epistemology of ethics, consequentialism, hedonism about well-being, and the weight to be given to self-interest. He holds that Sidgwick's long discussion of 'common-sense' morality is probably the best discussion of deontology we have. And yet The Methods of Ethics can be hard to understand, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  29. LAZARI-RADEK, KATERZYNA DE; SINGER, PETER, The Point of View of the Universe. Sidgwick and Contemporary Ethics, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2014, 403 pp. [REVIEW]Carlos Ortiz de Landázuri - 2015 - Anuario Filosófico 48 (2):388-391.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Point of View of the Universe: Sidgwick and Contemporary Ethics.Robert Shaver - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (259):301-304.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Review of David Phillips, Sidgwickian Ethics[REVIEW]Anthony Skelton - 2015 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 12 (6):794-797.
    This is a critical review of David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics. The book deserves high praise.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Underivative Duty: British Moral Philosophers from Sidgwick to Ewing, edited by Thomas Hurka.G. Sterling - 2015 - Mind 124 (494):636-639.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Colloquium 5 Commentary on Schultz.Suzanne Stern-Gillet - 2015 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 30 (1):142-155.
    The paper, although polemical for the most part, also presents a substantive thesis. The polemical part is directed at the claim that the Platonic Socrates held that philosophy as a practice is to be devoted to the care of self and others, and that the expression of emotion is an important aspect of the philosophic life. To undermine that claim, counter-examples from the autobiographical narrative in the Phaedo and the speeches of Diotima and Alcibiades in the Symposium are brought in. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Sidgwickian Ethics, by David Phillips.Katarzyna De Lazari-Radek - 2014 - Mind 123 (491):951-956.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. British Ethical Theorists from Sidgwick to Ewing.Thomas Hurka - 2014 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This is the first full historical study of a key strand in the development of modern moral philosophy. The subject is a school of British ethical theorists from the late 19th to the mid-20th century, including Sidgwick and Moore. Hurka shows what these philosophers thought, how they influenced each other, and how their ideas changed through time.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  36. Sidgwick on Consequentialism and Deontology: A Critique.Thomas Hurka - 2014 - Utilitas 26 (2):129-152.
    In The Methods of Ethics Henry Sidgwick argued against deontology and for consequentialism. More specifically, he stated four conditions for self-evident moral truth and argued that, whereas no deontological principles satisfy all four conditions, the principles that generate consequentialism do. This article argues that both his critique of deontology and his defence of consequentialism fail, largely for the same reason: that he did not clearly grasp the concept W. D. Ross later introduced of a prima facie duty or duty other (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37. The Point of View of the Universe: Sidgwick and Contemporary Ethics.Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek & Peter Singer - 2014 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    What does the idea of taking 'the point of view of the universe' tell us about ethics? Lazari-Radek and Singer defend objectivism in ethics, and hedonistic utilitarianism, following Henry Sidgwick's lead. They explore how to justify an ethical theory; conflicts of self-interest and universal benevolence; and whether we should discount the future.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  38. Sidgwick's Axioms and Consequentialism.Robert Shaver - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (2):173-204.
    Sidgwick gives various tests for highest certainty. When he applies these tests to commonsense morality, he finds nothing of highest certainty. In contrast, when he applies these tests to his own axioms, he finds these axioms to have highest certainty. The axioms culminate in Benevolence: “Each one is morally bound to regard the good of any other individual as much as his own, except in so far as he judges it to be less, when impartially viewed, or less certainly knowable (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. On Henry Sidgwick’s “My Station and Its Duties”.Anthony Skelton - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):586-591.
    This is a retrospective essay on Henry Sidgwick's "My Station and Its Duties" written to mark the 125th anniversary of Ethics. It engages with Sidgwick's remarks on the kind of ethical expertise that the moral philosopher possesses and on his approach to practical ethics generally.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Henry Parkes [Book Review].Maggie Catterall - 2013 - Agora (History Teachers' Association of Victoria) 48 (1):56.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Metaphysics, Epistemology, Utilitarianism, Intuitionism, and Egoism: A Response to Phillips on Sidgwick.Roger Crisp - 2013 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    The shape of contemporary ethics owes a great deal to Henry Sidgwick, through his influence on Rawls, Parfit, and others. No one who reads David Phillips’s outstanding book can be left in the slightest doubt about Sidgwick’s continuing significance for both metaethics and normative ethics. Phillips’s scholarship and his substantive arguments are powerful and insightful, and I find them largely persuasive. So in these remarks I intend merely to raise a few questions about each of his four main..
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Possession or Insanity?: Two Views from the Victorian Lunatic Asylum.Anthony Ossa-Richardson - 2013 - Journal of the History of Ideas 74 (4):553-575.
  43. Sidgwickian Ethics – An overview.David Phillips - 2013 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    My aim in Sidgwickian Ethics is to interpret and evaluate the central argument of The Methods of Ethics, in a way that brings out the important conceptual and historical connections between Sidgwick’s views and contemporary moral philosophy. Sidgwick defines a “method of ethics” as “any rational procedure by which we determine what individual human beings ‘ought’ – or what it is ‘right’ for them – to do, or to seek to realise by voluntary action” (ME 1). He finds just three (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Replies to Crisp, Shaver and Skelton.David Phillips - 2013 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    It is a great privilege to have one’s work critiqued by such a distinguished trio of philosophers and Sidgwick scholars. I owe further debts to Anthony and Rob, who were the OUP referees for my book. As will have been quite evident from the preceding discussion, they would not want to be held responsible for the book’s detailed contents, on which they gave me much excellent commentary. But, in thanking them here, I do want to say in particular that it (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Sidgwick.Bart Schultz - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter discusses the life and ethical philosophy of Henry Sidgwick. His masterpiece, The Methods of Ethics, first published in 1874, marks the culmination of the classical and nontheological utilitarian tradition, which took ‘the greatest happiness’ as the fundamental normative demand. Sidgwick was also a reformer who always advocated education as the crucial issue for historical progress, in ethics, economics, politics, and other areas. His practical ethics, often only indirectly utilitarian, involved finding common ground despite foundational ethical differences, and that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Utilitarianism and Egoism in Sidgwickian Ethics.Robert Shaver - 2013 - Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    In his excellent Sidgwickian Ethics, David Phillips argues that Sidgwick’s argument for utilitarianism from the axioms is less successful than Sidgwick believes. He also argues that Sidgwick’s argument for egoism is more successful than this argument for utilitarianism. I disagree. I close by noting, briefly, a possible solution to an epistemological puzzle in Sidgwick that Phillips raises. I. Utilitarianism Phillips takes the argument for utilitarianism to have two premises: The good of...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Sidgwickian Ethics (review).Robert Shaver - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):136-137.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Sidgwick’s Argument for Utilitarianism and his Moral Epistemology: A Reply to David Phillips.Anthony Skelton - 2013 - Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    David Phillips’s Sidgwickian Ethics is a penetrating contribution to the scholarly and philosophical understanding of Henry Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics. This note focuses on Phillips’s understanding of (aspects of) Sidgwick’s argument for utilitarianism and the moral epistemology to which he subscribes. In § I, I briefly outline the basic features of the argument that Sidgwick provides for utilitarianism, noting some disagreements with Phillips along the way. In § II, I raise some objections to Phillips’s account of the epistemology underlying (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics: Introduction.Anthony Skelton - 2013 - Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    This is a brief introduction to a symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Sense and Sensibility in Kant's Practical Agent: Against the Intellectualism of Korsgaard and Sidgwick.Julian Wuerth - 2013 - European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):1-36.
    Drawing on a wide range of Kant's recorded thought beyond his Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, this essay presents an overview of Kant's account of practical agency as embodied practical agency and argues against the intellectualized interpretations of Kant's account of practical agency presented by Christine Korsgaard and Henry Sidgwick. In both Kant's empirical-psychological and metaphysical descriptions of practical agency, he presents a recognizably human practical agent that is broader and deeper than the faculty of reason alone. This agent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
1 — 50 / 388