About this topic
Summary Most philosophers and laypeople believe that under most conditions human beings, perhaps along with some other animals, possess a power of selecting and implementing actions which is special. This power is very widely held to be a necessary condition of responsibility for actions, for autonomy and for being entitled to take pride in (or to feel shame for) one's achievements. The free will debate in philosophy aims at elucidating the nature of that power as well as at identifying potential threats to it and explaining how it can exist. A major focus of the debate is the compatibility of free will with causal determinism. A minority of philosophers deny that we have free will because free will is incompatible with causal determinism.
Key works The free will debate is ancient in Western philosophy, but was first developed systematically by scholastic thinkers concerning about the relationship free will and God's foreknowledge (eg Ockham 1983). The rise of mechanistic science brought determinism to the forefront and played an important role in the development of compatibilism by philosophers like Hume (Hume 1751). The advent of Frankfurt-style cases (Frankfurt 1969) transformed the late 20th century debate, by allowing compatibilists to dispense with the principle of alternate possibilities (see Widerker & McKenna 2003 for important contributions to this debate). At the same time, important new libertarian views have been developed by thinkers like Robert Kane (Kane 1996) and Timothy O'Connor (O'Connor 2000). Very recently, there has been a revival of free will skepticism (Strawson 1994; Levy 2011).
Introductions O'Connor & Franklin 2018;McKenna 2008; Clarke & Capes ms
Related categories

9689 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 9689
Material to categorize
  1. Kindred Fatalisms: Debating Science, Islam, and Free Will in the Darwinian Era.M. Alper Yalçınkaya - forthcoming - Annals of Science:1-22.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Free Will and God's Universal Causality: The Dual Sources Account.W. Matthews Grant - 2019 - New York: Bloomsbury.
    The traditional doctrine of God's universal causality holds that God directly causes all entities distinct from himself, including all creaturely actions. But can our actions be free in the strong, libertarian sense if they are directly caused by God? W. Matthews Grant argues that free creaturely acts have dual sources, God and the free creaturely agent, and are ultimately up to both in a way that leaves all the standard conditions for libertarian freedom satisfied. Offering a comprehensive alternative to existing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. W. Matthews Grant Free Will and God's Universal Causality: The Dual Sources Account. (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019). Pp. Viii + 248. £85.00 (Hbk). ISBN 9781350082908. [REVIEW]Gregory R. P. Stacey - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (2):464-468.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Problem of the Freedom of Will: Historico-Philosophical Topics in the Analytic Perspective. Hausmannn, M., & Noller, J. (Eds.). (2021). Free Will. Historical and Analytic Perspectives. Cham: Springer; Palgrave Macmillan. [REVIEW]Dmytro Sepetyi - 2022 - Sententiae 41 (1):111-122.
    Rewiew of Hausmannn, M., & Noller, J... Free Will. Historical and Analytic Perspectives. Cham: Springer; Palgrave Macmillan.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Actual Control - Demodalising Free Will.David Heering - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Leeds
    Plausibly, agents act freely iff their actions are responses to reasons. But what sort of relationship between reason and action is required for the action to count as a response? The overwhelmingly dominant answer to this question is modalist. It holds that responses are actions that share a modally robust or secure relationship with the relevant reasons. This thesis offers a new alternative answer. It argues that responses are actions that can be explained by reasons in the right way. This (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Free Will and the Rebel Angels in Medieval Philosophy by Tobias Hoffmann. [REVIEW]Dominik Perler - 2022 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 60 (2):340-341.
    Human beings quite often choose bad actions because of cognitive deficits: they fail to understand what they ought to do. But what about angels? They are, by definition, perfect in their cognition. How can they choose bad actions or even commit sins? At first sight, this problem seems to be of mere theological significance, for it is only in the context of Christian theology that angels are supposed to exist. However, a closer look reveals that the problem runs deeper, as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. On the Free Will That the Free Will Wills.Robbie McClintock - 2018 - Philosophy of Education 74:608-614.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Compatibilist Libertarianism: Why It Talks Past the Traditional Free Will Problem and Determinism Is Still a Worry.John Daniel Wright - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association:1-19.
    Compatibilist libertarianism claims that alternate possibilities for action at the agential level are consistent with determinism at the physical level. Unlike traditional compatibilism about alternate possibilities, involving conditional or dispositional accounts of the ability to act, compatibilist libertarianism offers us unqualified modalities at the agential level, consistent with physical determinism, a potentially big advance. However, I argue that the account runs up against two problems. Firstly, the way in which the agential modalities are generated talks past the worries of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Experimental Approach to Free Will: Freedom in the Laboratory.Katherin A. Rogers - 2022 - Routledge.
    Rogers canvases the literature critical of recent experiments, adding new criticisms of her own. She argues these experiments should not undermine belief in human freedom and lists ethical and practical problems facing the attempt to study free will experimentally.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Do We Have Free Will?: A Debate.Robert Kane & Carolina Sartorio - 2021 - Routledge.
    In this little but profound volume, Robert Kane and Carolina Sartorio debate a perennial question: Do We Have Free Will? Short, lively and accessible, the debate showcases diverse and cutting-edge work on free will.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A Pragmatic Approach to Libertarian Free Will.John Lemos - 2018 - Routledge.
    A Pragmatic Approach to Libertarian Free Will argues that the kind of free will required for moral responsibility and just desert is libertarian free will. It is a source of great controversy whether such a libertarian view is coherent and whether we should believe that we have such free will. This book explains and defends Robert Kane¿s conception of libertarian free will while departing from it in certain key respects. It is argued that a suitably modified Kanean model of free (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. Prevention, Coercion, and Two Concepts of Negative Liberty.Michael Garnett - 2022 - In Mark McBride & Visa A. J. Kurki (eds.), Without Trimmings: The Legal, Moral, and Political Philosophy of Matthew Kramer. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 223-238.
    This paper argues that there are two irreducibly distinct negative concepts of liberty: freedom as non-prevention, and freedom as non-coercion. Contemporary proponents of the negative view, such as Matthew Kramer and Ian Carter, have sought to develop the Hobbesian idea that freedom is essentially a matter of physical non-prevention. Accordingly, they have sought to reduce the freedom-diminishing effect of coercion to that of prevention by arguing that coercive threats function to diminish freedom by preventing people from performing certain combinations of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Mechanism, Purpose and Agency: The Metaphysics of Mental Causation and Free Will.Neal Damian Judisch - 2008 - Dissertation, University of Texas at Austin
    Libertarianism is a thesis according to which free will is incompatible with determinism and human agents possess free will to some degree. Three formidable objections have been raised against this thesis by its opponents: Libertarianism requires the falsity of philosophical naturalism or materialist theories of mind; Indeterminism threatens freedom by undermining the rational, volitional control of agents; If indeterminism does not threaten our freedom, then neither does it enhance our freedom or add to human agency anything of appreciable value. I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Theological Determinism & Free Will: A Philosophical Approach.Atikur Rahman - 2022 - Philosophical Magazine 2 (1):1-9.
    Theological determinism challenges Free Will, an important part of the theistic view. Determinants claim that free will is incompatible with God's omniscience and that God is responsible for everything that happens. I argue in this paper that so-called theological determinism never denies free will and that free will is compatible with God's omniscience.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Theological Determinism & Free Will: A Philosophical Approach.Atikur Rahman - manuscript
    Theological determinism challenges Free Will, an important part of the theistic view. Determinants claim that free will is incompatible with God's omniscience and that God is responsible for everything that happens. I argue in this paper that so-called theological determinism never denies free will and that free will is compatible with God's omniscience -/- .
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Theological Determinism & Free Will: A Philosophical Approach.Atikur Rahman - 2022 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 8 (4):1-9.
    Theological determinism challenges Free Will, an important part of the theistic view. Determinants claim that free will is incompatible with God's omniscience and that God is responsible for everything that happens. I argue in this paper that so-called theological determinism never denies free will and that free will is compatible with God's omniscience.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Free Will Without Consciousness?Liad Mudrik, Inbal Gur Arie, Yoni Amir, Yarden Shir, Pamela Hieronymi, Uri Maoz, Timothy O'Connor, Aaron Schurger, Manuel Vargas, Tillmann Vierkant, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Adina Roskies - forthcoming - Trends in Cognitive Sciences.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Consider the Tumor: Brain Tumors Decrease Punishment Via Perceptions of Free Will.Alec J. Stinnett & Jessica L. Alquist - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology:1-24.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Saving Eternity (and Divine Foreknowledge and Free Will): A Reply to Hasker.Katherin Rogers - 2022 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 70 (1):79-89.
    William Hasker and I disagree over whether or not appealing to a particular understanding of divine eternity can reconcile divine foreknowledge with libertarian human freedom. Hasker argues that if God had foreknowledge of a particular future choice, that choice cannot be free with libertarian freedom. I hold, to the contrary, that, given a certain theory of time—the view that all times exist equally—it is possible to reconcile divine foreknowledge with libertarian freedom. In a recent article, “Can Eternity be Saved? A (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. The Openness of God: Hasker on Eternity and Free Will.Eleonore Stump - 2022 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 70 (1):91-106.
    The understanding of God’s mode of existence as eternal makes a significant difference to a variety of issues in contemporary philosophy of religion, including, for instance, the apparent incompatibility of divine omniscience with human freedom. But the concept has come under attack in current philosophical discussion as inefficacious to solve the philosophical puzzles for which it seems so promising. Although Boethius in the early 6th century thought that the concept could resolve the apparent incompatibility between divine foreknowledge and human free (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Carnap’s Logical Probability and Free Will Dilemma.Paweł Pruski - 2022 - Open Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):133-145.
  22. On the Foundations of the Problem of Free Will.Paolo Galeazzi & Rasmus K. Rendsvig - forthcoming - Episteme:1-19.
    In a recent paper, Christian List has argued for the compatibilism of free will and determinism. Drawing on a distinction between physical possibility and agential possibility, List constructs a formal two-level model in which the two concepts are consistent. This paper's first contribution is to show that though List's model is formally consistent, philosophically it falls short of establishing a satisfactory compatibilist position. Ensuingly, an analysis of the shortcomings of the model leads to the identification of a controversial epistemological assumption (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Experimental Philosophy of Mind: Free Will and a Scientific Conception of the World.Morteza Izadifar - 2022 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 22 (1-2):41-59.
    Experimental philosophy has been engaged in many fields of philosophy and has tried to challenge philosophy from a new horizon. In this article, I have tried to examine what the role of sciences are in altering people’s intuition about free will. Could science educate people’s philosophical intuitions? If yes, should we still rely on their intuition as a rational instrument for our philosophical questions? Do science plus cultural and social differences effect on folks’ view? In this cross-cultural research, the emphasis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Free Will and the Rebel Angels in Medieval Philosophy, by Tobias Hoffmann.Jörn Müller - 2021 - Vivarium 59 (4):375-380.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Heath White Fate and Free Will. (Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2020). Pp. Xii + 396. £54.00/$65.00 (Hbk). ISBN 9780268106294. [REVIEW]Mark P. Maller - 2022 - Religious Studies 58 (1):292-293.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. The Implications of Experimental Philosophy and Moral Psychology for the Problem of Free Will.Garth Harold Elzerman - 2022 - Dissertation, University of South Africa
    The problem of free will has a long and intricate history. The millennia of development of the problem have seen the evolution of numerous free will viewpoints. A cursory look at the evolution of the concepts of free will and determinism, the various arguments, counterarguments, complex adjustments to arguments, the variety of sources of empirical research, and empirical insights illustrate the complexity of the debate. This elaborate reality opens itself to a pluralist account of free will and moral responsibility capable (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. “Responsibility After ‘Morality’: Strawson’s Naturalism and Williams’ Genealogy”.Paul Russell - forthcoming - In P.F. STRAWSON AND HIS LEGACY. Oxford, UK:
    “Responsibility After ‘Morality’: Strawson’s Naturalism and Williams’ Genealogy” -/- Although P.F. Strawson and Bernard Williams have both made highly significant and influential contributions on the subject of moral responsibility they never directly engaged with the views of each other. On one natural reading their views are directly opposed. Strawson seeks to discredit scepticism about moral responsibility by means of naturalistic observations and arguments. Williams, by contrast, employs genealogical methods to support sceptical conclusions about moral responsibility (and blame). This way of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Explaining Free Will by Rational Abilities.Frank Hofmann - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.
    In this paper I present an account of the rational abilities that make our decisions free. Following the lead of new dispositionalists, a leeway account of free decisions is developed, and the rational abilities that ground our abilities to decide otherwise are described in detail. A main result will be that the best account of the relevant rational abilities makes them two-way abilities: abilities to decide to do or not to do x in accordance with one’s apparent reasons. Dispositionalism about (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Elisabeth on Free Will, Preordination, and Philosophical Doubt.Martina Reuter - 2021 - In Sabrina Ebbersmeyer & Sarah Hutton (eds.), Elisabeth of Bohemia : A Philosopher in Her Historical Context. Springer Verlag. pp. 163-176.
    Elisabeth is widely known as a critic of René Descartes’ account of mind–body interaction and scholarly interpretations of her view on the will most often pose the question about the freedom of the will in relation to bodily impulses such as the passions. This chapter takes a different perspective and focuses on the problem of the compatibility of free will and providence, as it is discussed in a sequence of six letters that Elisabeth and Descartes wrote between September 1645 and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. Defending Free Will.Nicholas Rescher - 2021 - In Marco Hausmann & Jörg Noller (eds.), Free Will: Historical and Analytic Perspectives. Springer Verlag. pp. 73-89.
    This chapter will address seven questions regarding freedom of the will: Just what is freedom of the will? Does freedom require control? Does freedom require that the agent could have done otherwise? Does predictability preclude freedom? Is an act’s freedom compatible with its causal explanation? How can freedom of the will be evidentiated? Is free will unscientific? Drawing on John Locke’s famous example of a person who freely chooses to remain in a locked room, I argue that freedom does neither (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Some Free Thinking About ‘Thinking About Free Will’.Marco Hausmann - 2021 - In Marco Hausmann & Jörg Noller (eds.), Free Will: Historical and Analytic Perspectives. Springer Verlag. pp. 91-110.
    According to Peter van Inwagen’s arguments for the incompatibility of free will and determinism, nobody is able to do anything about the truth of a complete description of a past state of the world. In my chapter, I do not argue directly against this assumption. Instead, I develop four arguments to the conclusion that van Inwagen’s attempt to justify this assumption fails. I argue that many philosophical views as well as independent arguments all speak against van Inwagen’s attempt to justify (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Cosmovisions and Realities - the Each One's Philosophy.Roberto Thomas Arruda (ed.) - 2022 - S.Paulo: Terra à Vista - ISBN 9798424769245.
    Cosmovision is a term that should mean a set of foundations from which emerges a systemic understanding of the Universe, its components as life, the world we live in, nature, the human phenomenon, and their relationships. It is, therefore, a field of analytical philosophy fed by the sciences, whose objective is this aggregated and epistemologically sustainable knowledge about everything that we are and contain, that surrounds us, and that relates to us in any way. It is something as old as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Reasons‐Sensitivity and Degrees of Free Will.Alex Kaiserman - 2022 - Wiley: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (3).
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Volume 103, Issue 3, Page 687-709, November 2021.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Free Will: Historical and Analytic Perspectives.Marco Haussman & Jorg Nöller (eds.) - 2021 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Gratitude to God for Our Own Moral Goodness.Robert J. Hartman - forthcoming - Faith and Philosophy.
    Someone owes gratitude to God for something only if God benefits her and is morally responsible for doing so. These requirements concerning benefit and moral responsibility generate reasons to doubt that human beings owe gratitude to God for their own moral goodness. First, moral character must be generated by its possessor’s own free choices, and so God cannot benefit moral character in human beings. Second, owed gratitude requires being morally responsible for providing a benefit, which rules out owed gratitude to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Free Will Fundamentals: Agency, Determinism, and (In)Compatibility.Kristin Mickelson - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Colorado, Boulder
    NOTE TO READERS: My current research program is firmly grounded in the technical aspects of this dissertation. That said, my views have evolved significantly since writing this dissertation, e.g. I've flipped my views on the best working definition of 'determinism', and I no longer defend the viability of incompatibilist-impossibilism (I still grant the superficial logical consistency of the two views, but now contend that there is no way to defend one without rejecting the other). I have also given up on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Free Will and the Rebel Angels in Medieval Philosophy. [REVIEW]Joseph Madonna - 2022 - Augustinian Studies 53 (1):113-115.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Free Will: Historical and Analytic Perspectives.Marco Hausmann & Jörg Noller (eds.) - 2021 - Springer Verlag.
    This novel contributed volume advances the current debate on free will by bridging the divide between analytic and historically oriented approaches to the problem. With thirteen chapters by leading academics in the field, the volume is divided into three parts: free will and determinism, free will and indeterminism, and free will and moral responsibility. The contributors aim to initiate a philosophical discourse that profits from a combination of the two approaches. On the one hand, the analytic tools familiar from the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Androids, Oracles and Free Will.Maria Sekatskaya - 2022 - Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy 35 (4):359-378.
    Claims about freedom and predestination are ubiquitous in movies, novels, and myths. These claims touch upon the philosophical problem of the compatibility of free will and determination. In order to make an informed judgment about whether these claims are true, it is helpful to know what philosophers have to say about free will. However, philosophical discussions are usually absent in popular culture. It is perhaps no wonder, since free will is a topic that has been discussed for millennia. Consequently, these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Free Will and Punishment Scale: Efficient Measurement and Predictive Validity Across Diverse and Nationally Representative Adult Samples.Adam Feltz, Edward Cokely & Braden Tanner - 2021 - Consciousness and Cognition 95:103215.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Retributivism and Uncertainty : Why Do We Punish Criminals?Sofia Jeppsson - 2021 - Daily Philosophy (18).
    Published on Daily Philosophy 2021-10-18 Why do we have a criminal justice system? What could possibly justify the state punishing its citizens? Philosophers, scholars of law, politicians and others have proposed different justifications, one of them being retributivism: the view that we ought to give offenders the suffering that they deserve for harming others. However, intentionally harming other people and making them suffer is serious business. If we are to do this in the name of what’s right and good, we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Body, Mind, and Spirit: The Crack in the Western Model.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    A brief reflection on the mind-body problem and its implications for the way we conceive of ourselves and live our lives.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Libertad y naturaleza en Bolívar Echeverría.Yankel Peralta García - 2016 - In Stefan Gandler (ed.), Stefan Gandler (coord.) (2016), Teoría crítica. Imposible resignarse. Pesadillas de represión y aventuras de emancipación, México, Universidad autónoma de Querétaro/Miguel Ángel Porrúa. Ciudad de México, CDMX, México: pp. 161-170.
    Un artículo mío sobre Bolívar Echeverría y su concepto de Libertad.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Comparative Evaluation of Free Will in Muhammad Taqi Ja’Fari and John Searle’s View.Seyed Ahmad Fazeli, Marziyeh Sadeghi & Morteza Zare Ganjaroudi - 2021 - Journal of Philosophical Theological Research 23 (1):5-30.
    The question of free will has long been considered one of the most important philosophical questions. It can be said that different and even conflicting opinions have been expressed on this issue. Allamah Jafari and John Searle are two thinkers who, in their intellectual framework, have made a significant contribution to clarifying the “free will” debate. The two thinkers agree on various issues such as the role of the ‘I’ in creating free will, the non-randomness of action, the existence of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Time, Law and Free Will.Anna Marmodoro, Christopher Austin & Andrea Roselli (eds.) - forthcoming - Springer.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Why the Readiness Potential Does Not Disprove Free Will.Totland Even - 2021 - Stance 14:124-134.
    Neuroscientist Benjamin Libet has conducted a series of experiments that reveal the existence of certain neural processes in the brain of human subjects, initiating an action prior to the human subject’s intention to act, thus seemingly threatening our idea of free will. The purpose of this paper is to show how these processes do not disprove any idea of free will one might have as one would, if accepting such a thesis, be committing two distinct mereological fallacies and ultimately, would (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Experimental Philosophy on Free Will and Determinism.Robin Aldridge-Sutton - unknown
    In the debate over whether free will is compatible with determinism most philosophers on both sides think that folk intuitions are a constraint on philosophical theorising. Most also think that the same criteria are required for free will in all cases. But recent attempts to empirically study folk intuitions about free will appear to show that these two positions cannot be jointly maintained. That is because folk intuitions about free will appear to represent compatibilist and incompatibilist criteria for free will (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Analogical Reasoning in Saint Anselm's De Concordia: Grace, Free Will, and Cooperation.Robert Allen - manuscript
    St. Anselm is a master of philosophical prose. His writings on God, truth, and free will are models of clarity born of unflagging concern for argumentative precision. He is especially adept at using analogies to cinch his readers' understanding of these recondite matters. Who could forget the light shed upon the concept of existence by the Painter Analogy in the Ontological Argument or how his River Analogy illumines the unification of the Holy Trinity? Such intellectual insights could only be gifts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. The Fundamental Unity Of Voluntary And Involuntary Actions.Aadarsh Singh - manuscript
    Social structure of our society decides the actions that are allowed by any individual human being. All the actions of an individual are characterized into voluntary or involuntary actions, which decides the behaviour of society towards that individual for that action. In this paper it has been shown that the characterization of action into these two categories is fundamentally flawed.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Analogical Reasoning in St. Anselm's Concordia: Free Will, Grace, and Cooperation.Robert Allen - manuscript
    St. Anselm is a master of philosophical prose. His writings on God, truth, and free will are models of clarity born of unflagging concern for argumentative precision. He is especially adept at using analogies to cinch his readers' understanding of these recondite matters. Who could forget the light shed upon the concept of existence by the Painter Analogy in the Ontological Argument or how his River Analogy illumines the unification of the Holy Trinity? Such intellectual insights could only be gifts (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 9689