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  1. Modelling Culinary Value.Patrik Engisch - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    Culinary products have culinary value. That is, they have value qua culinary products. However, what is the nature of culinary value and what elements determine it? In the light of the central and universal role that culinary products play in our lives, offering a philosophical analysis of culinary value is a matter of interest. This paper attempts to do just this. It develops three different possible models of culinary value, two rather restricted ones and a third more encompassing one, rejects (...)
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  2. Food, Art and Philosophy.Paloma Atencia Linares & Aaron Meskin - 2021 - Critica 53 (157).
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  3. A Philosophy of Recipes: Making, Experiencing, and Valuing.Andrea Borghini & Patrik Engisch (eds.) - 2021 - Bloomsbury.
    This volume addresses three major themes regarding recipes: their nature and identity; their relationship to territory, producers, consumers and places of production. The first part looks at taxonomies of recipes, the relationship between recipes and their source, and how recipes have changed over time, including case studies that look at unsourced recipes through to recipes for foods that are very highly processed. The second part identifies the constitutive relationships that characterize recipes, between territory, producers, consumers, places and spaces of production. (...)
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  4. Meals, Art and Meaning.Eileen John - 2021 - Critica 53 (157).
    This paper takes meals, rather than food itself, as its focus. Meals incorporate the project of nutrition into human life, but it is a contingent matter that we nourish ourselves in this way. This paper defends the importance of meals as meaning-makers and contrasts them with art in that regard. Meals and art represent interestingly different extremes with respect to how needs for meaning are met. Artworks ask for coordination of experience, understanding and appreciation: the meaning of art is to (...)
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  5. Bittersweet Food.Shen-yi Liao - 2021 - Critica 53 (157):71-93.
    Nostalgia and food are intertwined universals in human experience. All of us have experienced nostalgia centered on food, and all of us have experienced food infused with nostalgia. To explore the links between nostalgia and food, I start with a rough taxonomy of nostalgic foods, and illustrate it with examples. Despite their diversity, I argue that there is a psychological commonality to experiencing nostalgic foods of all kinds: imagination. On my account, imagination is the key to understanding the cognitive, conative, (...)
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  6. Donald Phillip Verene, The Science of Cookery and the Art of Eating Well, Studies in Medical Philosophy, No. 3, Stuttgart: Ibidem-Verlag, 2018, eBook, 124 Pp., € 14.99, ISBN: 978-3-8382-7198-9. [REVIEW]Riccardo Magini - 2021 - Sofia Philosophical Review 14:35-37.
  7. Can Food Be Art in Virtue of Its Savour Alone?Mohan Matthen - 2021 - Critica 53 (157).
    Food has savour: a collection of properties (including appearance, aroma, mouth-feel) connected with the pleasure (or displeasure) of eating. After explaining this concept, and outlining a theory of aesthetic pleasure, I argue that, like paradigm examples of art, savour can be assessed relative to a culturally determined set of norms. Also like paradigm examples of art, the assessment of savour has no objective basis in the absence of such cultural norms. My argument in this paper is part of a larger (...)
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  8. Arte culinario y creación poética en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.Sofía Ortiz-Hinojosa & Sergio Armando Gallegos Ordorica - 2021 - Critica 53 (157).
    En el presente artículo, exploramos las conexiones que existen entre el arte culinario y la obra poética de Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. En particular, usamos un estudio detallado de las analogías que emergen entre la comida y la preparación culinaria por un lado, y la poesía y la composición poética, por otro lado. En este artículo mostramos que el arte culinario funciona como causa o catalizador de la creación poética y que existe una relación íntima y profunda entre (...)
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  9. The Aesthetics of Food.Alexandra Plakias - 2021 - Philosophy Compass 16 (11):e12781.
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  10. Arte culinario y creación poética en Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.Gallegos Ordorica Sergio & Ortiz Hinojosa Sofia - 2021 - Critica 53 (157):13-44.
    In this paper, we explore the connections between the culinary art and the poetic work by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz. In particular, following a detailed study of the analogies between, on the one hand, food and culinary preparation, and on the other hand, poetry and composition, we show that culinary art functions as cause and catalyst of Sor Juana’s poetic creation. Also, we show that, for the hieronymite nun, there is an intimate and profound relation between good seasoning, (...)
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  11. Can Unmodified Food Be Culinary Art?Sara Bernstein - 2020 - Argumenta 2 (5):185-198.
    You are sitting in Chez Panisse, Alice Waters’ acclaimed restaurant in Berkeley, California. After an extensively prepared, multi-course meal, out comes the dessert course: an unmodified but perfectly juicy, fresh peach. Many chefs serve such unmodified or barely-modified foods with the intention that they count as culinary art. This paper takes up the question of whether unmodified foods, served in the relevant institutional settings, can count as culinary art. I propose that there is a distinctive form of aesthetic trust involved (...)
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  12. Recipes and Culinary Creativity. The Noma Legacy.Patrik Engisch - 2020 - Humana Mente 13 (38).
    In the past years, food has found itself a central focus of creativity in contemporary culture and a pinnacle of this trend has been the kind of culinary creativity displayed at Noma in Copenhagen. But what is culinary creativity? And what is distinctive about the kind of culinary creativity displayed at places like Noma? In this paper, I attempt to answer these two questions. Building up on pioneering work on creativity by Margaret Boden, I argue that creativity is a matter (...)
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  13. Estetica Ecologica. Percepire Saggio, Vivere Corrispondente di Nicola Perullo.Nicola Perullo, Manlio Iofrida & Giovanni Fava - 2020 - Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 13 (1):181-192.
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  14. Coffee Cues Elevate Arousal and Reduce Level of Construal.Eugene Y. Chan & Sam J. Maglio - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 70:57-69.
    Coffee and tea are two beverages commonly-consumed around the world. Therefore, there is much research regarding their physiological effects. However, less is known about their psychological meanings. Derived from a predicted lay association between coffee and arousal, we posit that exposure to coffee-related cues should increase arousal, even in the absence of actual ingestion, relative to exposure to tea-related cues. We further suggest that higher arousal levels should facilitate a concrete level of mental construal as conceptualized by Construal Level Theory. (...)
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  15. Morality and Aesthetics of Food.Shen-yi Liao & Aaron Meskin - 2018 - In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Food Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 658-679.
    This chapter explores the interaction between the moral value and aesthetic value of food, in part by connecting it to existing discussions of the interaction between moral and aesthetic values of art. Along the way, this chapter considers food as art, the aesthetic value of food, and the role of expertise in uncovering aesthetic value. Ultimately this chapter argues against both food autonomism (the view that food's moral value is unconnected to its aesthetic value) and Carolyn Korsmeyer's food moralism (the (...)
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  16. Experimental Philosophical Aesthetics as Public Philosophy.Aaron Meskin & Shen-yi Liao - 2018 - In Sébastien Réhault & Florian Cova (eds.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics. New York: Bloomsbury. pp. 309-326.
    Experimental philosophy offers an alternative mode of engagement for public philosophy, in which the public can play a participatory role. We organized two public events on the aesthetics of coffee that explored this alternative mode of engagement. The first event focuses on issues surrounding the communication of taste. The second event focuses on issues concerning ethical influences on taste. -/- In this paper, we report back on these two events which explored the possibility of doing experimental philosophical aesthetics as public (...)
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  17. Food Landscapes: An Object-Centered Model of Food Appreciation.Matteo Ravasio - 2018 - The Monist 101 (3):309-323.
    In this paper I claim that Allen Carlson’s object-centered model for the aesthetic appreciation of nature could be extended to food. The application of an object-centered model to food requires the identification of appropriate foci of appreciative attention. I claim that knowledge about food function and history is relevant to its appreciation, as is the interplay between the resources of a territory and the way in which these are used by its inhabitants. After having offered a brief application of the (...)
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  18. El vientre de los modernos. Psicología, fisiologia y filologia de la consciencia historíca.Filippo Fimiani - 2017 - Boletín de Estética 39:7-42.
    “La ‘modernidad’ a través de la imagen de la comida y la digestión”. Ésta es la tarea y el programa de la genealogía fisiológica y psicológica identificada con claridad por Nietzsche en un fragmento del otoño de 1888 y firmemente perseguida en toda su obra. El diagnóstico es implacable y es posible por un uso extendido de la metáfora gastronómica, aplicada a todos los campos de la experiencia y el lenguaje por una escritura temeraria de la historia. Como Valéry y (...)
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  19. Somaesthetics and the Fine Art of Eating.Richard Shusterman - 2016 - In Sherri Irvin (ed.), Body Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 261-280.
    This paper begins by distinguishing three different but related foci of gastronomical aesthetic theory: food preparation and presentation; the gustatory qualities and social meanings of the food we eat; and finally the various actions involved in the ingestion of food. This third, largely ignored dimension of gastronomical theory, constitutes the topic of this paper, which seeks to define the distinctive character of this art, elucidate its diverse values, and analyze its key elements. Particular attention is given to the much overlooked (...)
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  20. The Pleasures of the Table.Julian Baggini - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 65:68-74.
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  21. Food and Everyday Life.Thomas Conroy & Talia Welsh (eds.) - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Acknowledgments. The seed of this book began with a session on “food and everyday life” which took place at the 2010 Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy con- ference in Montreal, Canada. I thus wish to acknowledge and ...
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  22. Le plaisir de manger du chocolat.Fabrice Teroni - 2014 - In Olivier Massin & Anne Meylan (eds.), Aristote chez les Helvètes: Onze essais de métaphysique helvétique. Ithaque.
    A l’instar de bien d’autres activités, manger du chocolat suscite du plaisir. Mais comment articuler de manière satisfaisante les différents sens en jeu dans l’ingestion d’un aliment – le goût, bien sûr, mais aussi l’odorat, l’ouïe et le toucher – avec ce plaisir ? Selon une approche traditionnelle, ce dernier n’est rien de plus qu’une expérience ineffable qui, si elle s’avère accompagner certaines stimulations sensorielles ou des activités plus intellectuelles, ne porte sur rien du tout. Est-ce plausible ? Ou faudrait-il (...)
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  23. The Art of Food.Aaron Meskin - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):81-86.
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  24. Taste and Food in Rousseau's Julie, or the New Heloise. Wertz - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (3):24.
    What are the historical origins of aesthetic education? One of these comes from the eighteenth century. This became an important theme in a novel of the time. Published in 1761, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Julie, or the New Heloise: Letters of Two Lovers Who Live in a Small Town at the Foot of the Alps1 was an instant success in eighteenth-century Europe. Widely read, the novel made European culture self-conscious and forced it to pay attention to aspects of living that had gone (...)
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  25. Starbucks and the Third Wave.John Hartmann - 2011 - In Scott F. Parker & Michael W. Austin (eds.), Coffee - Philosophy for Everyone: Grounds for Debate. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  26. Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2010 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Disgust is a strong aversion, yet paradoxically it can constitute an appreciative aesthetic response to works of art. Artistic disgust can be funny, profound, sorrowful, or gross. This book examines numerous examples of disgust as it is aroused by art and offers a set of explanations for its aesthetic appeal.
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  27. The Book of Sent Soví: Medieval Recipes From Catalonia. [REVIEW]Paul Freedman - 2009 - The Medieval Review 5.
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  28. In but Not of, of but Not In: On Taste, Hipness, and White Embodiment.Robin James - 2009 - Contemporary Aesthetics.
    The status of the body figures paradoxically in the interrelated discourses of whiteness, aesthetic taste, and hipness. While Richard Dyer’s analysis of whiteness argues that white identity is “in but not of the body,” Carolyn Korsmeyer’s and Julia Kristeva’s feminist analyses of aesthetic “taste” demonstrate that this faculty is traditionally conceived as something “of” but not “in” the body. While taste directly distances whiteness from embodiment, hipness negatively affirms this same distance: the hipster proves his elite status within white culture (...)
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  29. Disputing Taste.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:70-76.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  30. Food, Morals And Meaning, Second Edition: The Pleasure And Anxiety Of Eating. [REVIEW]John Coveney - 2007 - Foucault Studies:197-200.
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  31. Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry.Dave Monroe & Fritz Allhoff (eds.) - 2007 - Blackwell.
    Food & Philosophy offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins Wine & Philosophy and Beer & Philosophy in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs.
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  32. On Disgust.Aurel Kolnai, Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2004 - Open Court.
    The problem of disgust has until recently been neglected in the scientific literature. In comparison to the scientific (psychological and metaphysical) interest that has been applied to hatred, anxiety, and similar phenomena, disgust — although a common and important factor in our emotional life — has been unexplored, or it has been viewed as a “higher degree of dislike,” as “nausea,” or as a phenomenon of the “repression of urges.” We here show how the feeling of disgust possesses a unique (...)
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  33. Visceral Values: Aurel Kolnai on Disgust.Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Aurel Kolnai's On Disgust. Open Court Publishing Company. pp. 1-23.
    In 1929 when Aurel Kolnai published his essay “On Disgust” in Husserl's ]ahrbuch he could truly assert that disgust was a "sorely neglected" topic. Now, however, this situation is changing as philosophers, psychologists, and historians of culture are turning their attention not only to emotions in general but more specifically to the large and disturbing set of aversive emotions, including disgust. We here provide an account of Kolnai’s contribution to the study of the phenomenon of disgust, of his general theory (...)
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  34. Carnal Appetites: FoodSexIdentities.Lisa M. Heldke - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):240-242.
  35. Delightful, Delicious, Disgusting.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):217–225.
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  36. Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
    Korsmeyer (philosophy, State U. of New York-Buffalo) disagrees with the centuries of philosophers before her that taste is beneath the dignity of the field. She explores how it gained such a low esteem, parallels between notions of aesthetic and gustatory taste, how the sense works scientifically, the multiple components of the experience, its various meanings in art and literature, and its sacred dimension. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR.
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  37. Food for Thought: Philosophy and Food.Elizabeth Telfer - 1996 - Routledge.
    The importance of food in our individual lives raises moral questions from the debate over eating animals to the prominence of gourmet cookery in the popular media. Through philosophy, Elizabeth Telfer discusses issues including our obligations to those who are starving; the value of the pleasure of food; food as art; our duties to animals; and the moral virtues of hospitableness and temperance. Elizabeth Telfer shows how much traditional philosophy, from Plato to John Stuart Mill, has to say to illuminate (...)
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  38. Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food.Deane W. Curtin & Lisa M. Heldke (eds.) - 1992 - Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy has often been criticized for privileging the abstract; this volume attempts to remedy that situation. Focusing on one of the most concrete of human concerns, food, the editors argue for the existence of a philosophy of food.
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