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  1. Indigenous and Local Knowledge and Aesthetics: Towards an Intergenerational Aesthetics of Nature.Nanda Jarosz - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    In a recent paper, Allen Carlson moves away from a purely scientific–cognitive framework for environmental aesthetics towards a ‘combination position’ based on the ecoaesthetics theorised by Xiangzhan Cheng. Carlson argues that only an aesthetics informed by ecological knowledge can offer the correct foundations for the continued relevance of environmental aesthetics to environmental ethics. However, closer analysis of Cheng’s theory of ecoaesthetics reveals a number of problems related to questions of anthropocentrism and in particular, the issue of an ethic based on (...)
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  2. Empathy for Plants.Matthew Hall - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  3. Ethical Values in a Post-Industrial Economy: The Case of the Organic Farmers’ Market in Granada.Alfredo Macías Vázquez & José Antonio Morillas del Moral - 2022 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 35 (2):1-19.
    The importance of the collective management of immaterial resources is a key variable in the valorisation of products in a post-industrial economy. The purpose of this paper is to analyse how, in post-industrial economies, it is possible to devise alternative forms of mediation between producers and consumers, such as organic farmers' markets, to curb the appropriation of rent by transnational and/or local business elites from the value created by immaterial resources. More specifically, we analyse those aspects of the collective management (...)
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  4. A Perspectival Account of the Concept of ‘Nature’.Anna Deplazes-Zemp - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  5. Book Review: Negotiating Theories of Nature for a More Complete Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Louise Muller - 2021 - Polylog: Forum for Intercultural Philosophy 42:133-136.
    What is the nature of reality? The truth is that no academic anywhere in the world really knows the answer to this question. As long as this remains the case, one can exclude neither the possibility that parallel universes, spirit ontologies, or telepathy exist nor the possibility that reality could be a time-space transcending non-local awareness. Neither scientists nor scholars can, therefore, ever reject epistemologies based on any of these presumptions. Enlightenment-based rationalists and empiricists, however, did just that. The point (...)
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  6. Educating Future Generations of Community Gardeners.Shane J. Ralston - 2012 - Critical Education 3 (3):1-17.
    I formulate a Deweyan argument for school gardening that prepares students for a specific type of gardening activism: community gardening, or the political activity of collectively organizing, planting and tending gardens for the purposes of food security, education and community development.
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  7. La inclusión como elemento integrador de las estrategias de adaptación al cambio climático: el caso del Plan 4C en la ciudad de Cartagena de Indias.Mauricio Luna-Galván, Iván Vargas-Chaves & Anna María Franco-Gantiva - 2020 - In Gloria Amparo Rodríguez (ed.), Retos para enfrentar el cambio climático en Colombia. Bogotá: Editorial Universidad del Rosario. pp. 207-242.
    Este capítulo de libro argumenta que la formulación de estrategias de adaptación en el caso de Cartagena necesita adoptar una visión integral de la resiliencia ante los impactos económicos y sociales de los riesgos climáticos. Para lograrlo, el sector privado y público tienen que integrar a la comunidad afectada, sin apartarse del contexto y respaldando el desarrollo de las capacidades sostenibles, la implementación sólida de proyectos, así como la sostenibilidad de las estrategias de adaptación climática. El principal objetivo es, por (...)
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  8. Public Health Ethics and Abortion: A Response to Simkulet.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2022 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (4):469-471.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 469-471, May 2022.
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  9. Amanda H. Lynch and Siri Veland, Urgency in the Anthropocene.Nora Ward - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):368-370.
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  10. Christine Harold, Things Worth Keeping: The Value of Attachment in a Disposable World.Piers H. G. Stephens - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):371-373.
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  11. World, Word, Work.Elke Pirgmaier - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):245-252.
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  12. Sarah McFarland Taylor, Ecopiety: Green Media and the Dilemma of Environmental Virtue.Gabriel Vasquez-Peterson - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):365-367.
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  13. Plant Philosophy and Interpretation: Making Sense of Contemporary Plant Intelligence Debates.Yogi H. Hendlin - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):253-276.
    Plant biologists widely accept plants demonstrate capacities for intelligence. However, they disagree over the interpretive, ethical and nomenclatural questions arising from these findings: how to frame the issue and how to signify the implications. Through the trope of 'plant neurobiology' describing plant root systems as analogous to animal brains and nervous systems, plant intelligence is mobilised to raise the status of plants. In doing so, however, plant neurobiology accepts an anthropocentric moral extensionist framework requiring plants to anthropomorphically meet animal standards (...)
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  14. What Makes an Environmental Steward? An Individual Differences Approach.Ryan Plummer, Julia Baird & Gillian Dale - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):295-322.
    Engaging in environmental stewardship is critical for sustainability. Understanding individual differences and engagement is an important gap in present scholarship and addressing it is necessary to understand individual factors that relate to the types of activities engaged in, motivations and barriers to environmental stewardship. We surveyed 637 Canadian and American adults via Amazon Mechanical Turk, querying a range of demographic, psychological and environmental perceptions factors as well as motivations and barriers to stewardship activities. Respondents were ultimately grouped into Non-Stewards, Home-Oriented (...)
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  15. Evidence of Degrowth Values in Food Justice in a Northern Canadian Municipality.Amanda Rooney & Helen Vallianatos - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):323-343.
    Our case study draws on emerging ideas of degrowth, showing how degrowth values and strategies may emerge where cities rely heavily on global food systems, and contributes to literature on food for degrowth in local contexts. Degrowth rejects the imperative of economic growth as a primary indicator of social wellness. A holistic understanding of wellness prescribes radical societal transformation, downscaling and decreasing consumption, strengthening community relationships and promoting resilience. Building on Bloemmen et al., we apply a holistic model of degrowth (...)
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  16. Heterotopia as an Environmental and Political Concept: The Case of Hannah Arendt's Philosophy.Urszula Lisowska - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):345-363.
    The paper offers a new model of politics adequate for the Anthropocene epoch. It uses the concept of 'heterotopia' to argue for the environmental potential of Arendtian political philosophy. The adopted meaning of heterotopia combines its Foucauldian and medical sources. It is argued that, thus understood, the concept can be applied to the Arendtian idea of judgment. In this capacity, the concept of heterotopia is both politically foundational and environmentally relevant. It helps us maintain the idea of politics as humanely (...)
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  17. Why Economic Valuation Does Not Value the Environment: Climate Policy as Collective Endeavour.Nicholas Bardsley, Graziano Ceddia, Rachel McCloy & Simone Pfuderer - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (3):277-293.
    Economics takes an individualistic approach to human behaviour. This is reflected in the use of 'contingent valuation' surveys to conduct cost benefit analysis for economic policy evaluation. An individual's valuation of a policy is assumed to be unaffected by the burdens it places on others. We report a survey experiment to test this supposition in the context of climate change policy. Willingness to pay for climate change mitigation was higher when richer individuals were to bear higher costs than when, as (...)
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  18. Philosophy: Environmental Ethics.David Schmidtz (ed.) - 2016 - Macmillan.
    The Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy series serves undergraduate college students who have had little or no exposure to philosophy, as well as the curious lay reader. Following this first primer volume, which introduces both the discipline and the topics of the remaining nine volumes, each handbook will usher the reader into a subfield of philosophy, and explore fifteen to thirty topics in that subfield. Every chapter in each volume will use vehicles such as film to facilitate understanding of philosophical issues; (...)
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  19. Defending Aesthetic Protectionism.Ned Hettinger - 2017 - In David Schmidtz (ed.), Philosophy: Environmental Ethics. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: pp. 287-308.
    Aesthetic reasons should be significant factors in justifying decisions about both natural and humanized environments. Far from being trivial or mere tools to find serious considerations, aesthetic rationales are necessary for appropriate environmental protection. Aesthetic responses to environments should be construed broadly to include cognitive, expressive, and sense-of-place dimensions. Aesthetic justifications for environmental protection go beyond shallow and deep anthropocentric rationales and involve direct appeal to environmental aesthetic merit. Although nature is not aesthetically positive in all dimensions, natural beauty is (...)
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  20. Jewish Environmental Ethics for the Anthropocene: An Integrative Approach.Hava Tirosh-Samuelson - 2022 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 30 (1):189-214.
    This article argues that the Judaic understanding of creation care is a potent response to the challenges of the Anthropocene because Judaism acknowledges that humans have much in common with all other created beings, while respecting their alterity, and because Judaism insists on human responsibility toward and care of the created world. However, Jewish environmental ethics of care and responsibility could be greatly enriched if it incorporates the insights of the feminist ethics of care, ecofeminism, and environmental virtue ethics, three (...)
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  21. A New Environmental Ethics: The Next Millennium for Life on Earth.Holmes Rolston - 2020 - Routledge.
    This Second Edition of A New Environmental Ethics: The Next Millennium for Life on Earth offers clear, powerful, and often moving thoughts from Holmes Rolston III, one of the first and most respected philosophers to write on the environment and often called the "father of environmental ethics." Rolston surveys the full spectrum of approaches in the field of environmental ethics and offers critical assessments of contemporary academic accounts. He draws on a lifetime of research and experience to suggest an outlook, (...)
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  22. Theocentrism is Not Anthropocentric: An Enlightened Environmentalist Reading of the Holy Qur'an.Olaniyan Adeola Seleem & Shamima Parvin Lasker - 2022 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):70-79.
    Humans should come down from their destructive arrogance stool to take the best cognizance of the fact that nature is a sculptural work of God. Their failure to realise this fact has been responsible for their formulation of the secular environmental theories which include; anthropocentrism, zoocentrism, biocentrism, ecocentrism, and the hybrid eco-feminism. Romanced with these theories the Holy Scriptures are also implicated by reading them in the light of one of these theories and considered anthropocentric. As a matter of fact, (...)
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  23. Environmental Ethics and Uncertainty: Wrestling with Wicked Problems.Whitney A. Bauman & Kevin J. O'Brien - 2019 - Routledge.
    "This book offers a multidisciplinary environmental approach to ethics in response to the contemporary challenge of climate change caused by globalized economics and consumption. This book synthesises the incredible complexity of the problem and the necessity of action in response, highlighting the unambiguous problem facing humanity in the 21st century, but arguing that it is essential to develop an ethics housed in ambiguity in response. Environmental Ethics and Uncertainty is divided into theoretical and applied chapters, with the theoretical sections engaging (...)
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  24. Environmental Ethics and Film.Pat Brereton - 2015 - Routledge.
    Environmental ethics presents and defends a systematic and comprehensive account of the moral relation between human beings and their natural environment and assumes that human behaviour toward the natural world can and is governed by moral norms. In contemporary society, film has provided a powerful instrument for the moulding of such ethical attitudes. Through a close examination of the medium, Environmental Ethics and Filmexplores how historical ethical values can be re-imagined and re-constituted for more contemporary audiences. Building on an extensive (...)
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  25. A Darwinian Worldview: Sociobiology, Environmental Ethics and the Work of Edward O. Wilson.Brian Baxter - 2007 - Routledge.
    Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection is considered in its application to human beings in this book. Brian Baxter examines the various sociobiological approaches to the explanation of human behaviour which view the human brain, and so the human mind, as the product of evolution, and considers the main arguments for and against this claim. In so doing he defends the approaches against some common criticisms, such as the charge that they are reductionist and dehumanising. The implications of these (...)
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  26. Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics.Simon P. James - 2004 - Routledge.
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  27. Grappling with Weeds: Invasive Species and Hybrid Landscapes in Cape York Peninsula, Far Northeast Australia.Mardi Reardon-Smith - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    The control of various introduced species brings to the fore questions around how species are categorised as ‘native’ or ‘invasive’, belonging or not belonging. In far north Queensland, Australia, the Cape York region is a complex mixture of land tenures, including pastoral leases, National Parks and Aboriginal land, and overlapping management agreements. Weed control comprises much of the work that land managers in Cape York do. However, different land managers target different introduced species for control, and the ways in which (...)
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  28. Christian Diehm. Connection to Nature, Deep Ecology, and Conservation Social Science: Human-Nature Bonding and Protecting the Natural World.Bryan E. Bannon - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):379-382.
  29. Steve Vanderheiden. Environmental Political Theory.Ben Mylius - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):383-384.
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  30. John Lauritz Larson. Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America.Richard Newman - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):385-387.
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  31. Why Environmental Philosophers Should Be "Buck-Passers" About Value.Espen Dyrnes Stabell - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):339-354.
    The value of nature has been extensively debated in environmental ethics. There has been less discussion, however, about how one should understand the relation between this value and normativity, or reasons: if something in nature is seen as valuable, how should we understand the relation between this fact and claims about reasons to, for example, protect it or promote its existence? The “commonsense” view is that value gives rise to reasons. The buck-passing account of value, on the other hand, implies (...)
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  32. Desert-Adjusted Utilitarianism, People, and Animals.Jean-Paul Vessel - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):355-377.
    Recent decades have witnessed a surge in philosophical attention to the moral standing of non-human animals. Kantians, Neo-Kantians, utilitarians, and radical animal rights theorists have staked their claims in the literature. Here Fred Feldman’s desert-adjusted utilitarianism is introduced into the fray. After canvassing the prominent competitors in the dialectic, a conception of an overall moral ranking consonant with desert-adjusted utilitarianism is developed. Then the conception’s implications regarding the particular locations of individual people and animals in such rankings across various scenarios (...)
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  33. Strong Sustainability Ethics.Michel Bourban - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):291-314.
    This article explains how strong sustainability ethics has emerged and developed as a new field over the last two decades as a critical response to influential conceptions of weak sustainability. It investigates three competing, normative approaches to strong sustainability: the communitarian approach, the Rawlsian approach, and the capabilities approach. Although these approaches converge around the idea that there are critical, non-substitutable natural resources and services, they diverge on how to reconcile human development and environmental protection. The aim of the paper (...)
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  34. Grounding Responsibility to Future Generations From a Kantian Standpoint.Igor Eterović - 2021 - Environmental Ethics 43 (4):315-337.
    The problem of responsibility to future generations is inherently related to responsibility for the environment. Attempting to provide a new grounding for the figuration of such responsibility, Hans Jonas used Immanuel Kant’s ethics as a paradigm of traditional ethics to provide a critique of their limitations in addressing these issues, and he found three crucial problems in Kant’s ethics. Kant’s philosophy provides enough material for an answer to Jonas by building an account which 1) gives a teleological grounding of responsibility (...)
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  35. Becoming a Place of Unrest: Environmental Crisis and Ecophenomenological Praxis.Robert Booth - 2021 - Athens, OH 45701, USA: Ohio University Press.
    The key to mitigating the environmental crisis isn’t just based on science; it depends upon a profound philosophical revision of how we think about and behave in relation to the world. -/- Our ongoing failure to interrupt the environmental crisis in a meaningful way stems, in part, from how we perceive the environment—what Robert Booth calls the "more-than-human world.” Anthropocentric presumptions of this world, inherited from natural science, have led us to better scientific knowledge about environmental problems and more science-based—yet (...)
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  36. Roger S. Gottlieb, Morality and the Environmental Crisis.Anh-Quân Nguyen - 2022 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 19 (1):103-106.
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  37. Desert-Adjusted Utilitarianism, People, and Animals in Advance.Jean-Paul Vessel - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  38. Grounding Responsibility to Future Generations From a Kantian Standpoint in Advance.Igor Eterović - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  39. Strong Sustainability Ethics in Advance.Michel Bourban - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  40. Legislative Overreach, Adaptation and Administrative Re-Regulation in Environmental Law.Ole W. Pedersen - forthcoming - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies.
    This article interrogates the use of regulatory position statements by the Environment Agency. Through an RPS, the Environment Agency undertakes to take no enforcement action against an operator in circumstances that ordinarily constitutes a breach of the law. The article argues that RPSs serve several important functions, chief among which is to respond to regulatory overreach, which arises when legislators enact comprehensive statutory instruments to deal with complex and technical matters such as environmental protection. Beyond responding to regulatory overreach, the (...)
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  41. Food Choices, Morality, and the Role of Environmental Ethics.Christos A. Tsekos & Tonia Vassilakou - 2022 - Philosophy Study 12 (3).
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  42. What’s in a Pandemic? COVID-19 and the Anthropocene.Manuel Arias-Maldonado - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    After the viral outbreak that hit populations across the planet in the first half of 2020, it has been argued that the coronavirus pandemic can be described as a quintessential phenomenon of the Anthropocene, i.e. the result of a particular stage of socionatural relations in which wild habitats are invaded and anthropogenic climate change creates the conditions for the emergence of more frequent viral pathogens. Likewise, it has also been argued that the pandemic is an event that shares structural features (...)
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  43. Giorgos Kallis, Susan Paulson, Giacomo D'Alisa and Federico Demaria, The Case for Degrowth.Stephen Quilley - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):233-236.
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  44. Erin McKenna, Living with Animals: Rights, Responsibilities, and Respect.Kimberly Dill - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):237-240.
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  45. Learning to Live With and Without Animals.Thomas Greaves & Norman Dandy - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):125-130.
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  46. Plurality, Engagement, Openness.Tom Greaves & Norman Dandy - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):115-124.
    As incoming Editor and Deputy Editor we describe our impression of the current situation that those committed to understanding and upholding environmental values find themselves in. We consider some of the factors that make enviornmental concern difficult to maintain, including conditions that affect us as academics, publishers, global citizens and activists. We describe some of the emerging trends that have appeared in Environmental Values in recent years, in philosophy, ecological economics, critical social science and widening interdisciplinarity in the environmental humanities. (...)
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  47. Duncan Kelly, Politics and the Anthropocene.Forrest Clingerman - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):241-243.
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  48. Saving the Last Person From Radical Scepticism: How to Justify Attributions of Intrinsic Value to Nature Without Intuition or Empirical Evidence.Alexander Pho & Allen Thompson - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Toby Svoboda argues that humans cannot ever justifiably attribute intrinsic value to nature because we can never have evidence that any part of non-human nature has intrinsic value. We argue that, at best, Svoboda’s position leaves us with uncertainty about whether there is intrinsic value in the non-human natural world. This uncertainty, however, together with reason to believe that at least some non-human natural entities would possess intrinsic value if anything does, leaves us in a position to acquire evidence that (...)
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  49. Crunch Time: The Urgency to Take the Temporal Dimension of Sustainability Seriously.Coline Ruwet - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    This paper argues that, to tackle the issue of sustainability, we should pay more attention to the temporality of socioecological processes. Only thus can we better understand current subjective and institutional constraints, as well as envision new potential pathways for transformative change. Two main arguments are developed: there is a uniqueness in the temporality of Earth system processes associated with planetary boundaries that deeply transforms our time horizon and the pace of change, and this situation creates a disruption of the (...)
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  50. Justifying an Intentional Species Extinction: The Case of Anopheles Gambiae.Daniel Edward Callies & Yasha Rohwer - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (2):193-210.
    Each year, over 200 million people are infected with the malaria parasite, nearly half a million of whom succumb to the disease. Emerging genetic technologies could, in theory, eliminate the burden of malaria throughout the world by intentionally eradicating the mosquitoes that transmit the disease. In this paper, we offer an ethical examination of the intentional eradication of Anopheles gambiae, the main malaria vector of sub-Saharan Africa. In our evaluation, we focus on two main considerations: the benefit of alleviating the (...)
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