Biomedical Ethics

Edited by L. Syd M Johnson (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Assistant editor: Tyler John (Longview Philanthropy)
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History/traditions: Biomedical Ethics

86129 found
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  1. Doctors as Resource Stewards? Translating High-Value, Cost-Conscious Care to the Consulting Room.Marjolein Moleman, Teun Zuiderent-Jerak, Marianne Lageweg, Gianni L. van den Braak & Tjerk Jan Schuitmaker-Warnaar - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-25.
    After many policy attempts to tackle the persistent rise in the costs of health care, physicians are increasingly seen as potentially effective resource stewards. Frameworks including the quadruple aim, value-based health care and choosing wisely underline the importance of positive engagement of the health care workforce in reinventing the system–paving the way to real affordability by defining the right care. Current programmes focus on educating future doctors to provide ‘high-value, cost-conscious care’, which proponents believe is the future of sustainable medical (...)
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  2. Losing One’s Head or Gaining a New Body?Jason T. Eberl - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):189-209.
    A surgical head-transplant technique, HEAVEN, promises to offer significantly improved quality of life for quadriplegics and others whose minds are functional, but whose bodies require artificial support to continue living. HEAVEN putatively actualizes a thought-experiment long debated by philosophers concerning the definition of personhood and criterion of personal identity through time and change. HEAVEN’s advocates presume to preserve the identity of the person whose head is transplanted onto another’s living body, leaving one’s previous body behind as one would their corpse. (...)
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  3. What Happens If the Brain Goes Elsewhere? Reflections on Head Transplantation and Personal Embodiment.Mark J. Cherry - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):240-256.
    Brain transplants have long been no more than the subject of science fiction and engaging thought experiments. That is no longer true. Neuroscientists have announced their intention to transplant the head of a volunteer onto a donated body. Response has been decidedly mixed. How should we think about the moral permissibility of head transplants? Is it a life-saving/life-enhancing opportunity that appropriately expands the boundaries of medical practice? Or, is it a bioethical morass that ought not to be attempted? For the (...)
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  4. Heads, Bodies, Brains, and Selves: Personal Identity and the Ethics of Whole-Body Transplantation.Ana Iltis - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):257-278.
    Plans to attempt what has been called a head transplant, a body transplant, and a head-to-body transplant in human beings raise numerous ethical, social, and legal questions, including the circumstances, if any, under which it would be ethically permissible to attempt whole-body transplantation in human beings, the possible effect of WBT on family relationships, and how families should shape WBT decisions. Our assessment of many of these questions depends partially on how we respond to sometimes centuries-old philosophical thought experiments about (...)
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  5. A Dilemma for Respecting Autonomy: Bridge Technologies and the Hazards of Sequential Decision-Making.Aidan Kestigian & Alex John London - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):293-310.
    Respect for patient autonomy can apply at two levels: ensuring that patient care reflects their considered values and wishes and honoring patient preferences about how to make momentous decisions. Caregivers who seek to respect patient autonomy in the context of some end-of-life decisions face a dilemma. Because these decisions are fraught, patients may prefer to approach them sequentially, only making decisions at the time they arise. However, respecting patients’ preferences for a sequential approach can increase the likelihood that surrogates and (...)
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  6. The Ethics of Head Transplant From the Confucian Perspective of Human Virtues.Jianhui Li & Yaming Li - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):230-239.
    Head transplantation has ignited intense discussions about whether it should be done scientifically and ethically. This paper examines the ethics of head transplantation from a Confucian perspective and offers arguments against the permissibility of head transplantation. From a Confucian point of view, human beings are the most precious organisms in the world, and ren and li are the basic moral principles of human beings. As long as head transplant technology remains underdeveloped, this procedure should not be done because it will (...)
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  7. Head Transplantation and Immortality: When Is Life Worth Living Forever?J. Clint Parker - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):279-292.
    Head transplantation fits within the broader conceptual space occupied by transhumanists and others who seek to extend the lives of human beings indefinitely. It is reasonable to reflect on whether, under what circumstances, and in what ways human immortality would be good. In this paper, I disambiguate the ways in which immortality might be considered a human good and then argue that immortality is neither necessary nor sufficient condition for objective meaning in life. I also argue that mortality is not (...)
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  8. Nosological Diagnosis, Theories of Categorization, and Argumentations by Analogy.Francesco Gagliardi - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):311-330.
    The nosological diagnosis is a particular type of nontheoretical diagnosis consisting of identifying the disease that afflicts the patient without explaining the underlying etiopathological mechanisms. Its origins are within the essentialist point of view on the nature of diseases, which dates back at least to 18th-century taxonomy studies. In this article, we propose a model of nosological diagnosis as a two-phase process composed of the categorization of inductive inferences and argumentations by analogy. In the inductive phase, disease entities are identified (...)
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  9. Whole-Body/Head Transplantation: Personal Identity, Experimental Surgery, and Bioethics.Mark J. Cherry & Ruiping Fan - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):179-188.
    This issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy brings together an international group of scholars from Hong Kong, Mainland China, and North America, critically to explore whole-body/head transplantation. The proposed procedure raises significant philosophical, ethical, and social/political questions. For example, assuming transplant is successful, who survives the surgery? Does personal identity necessarily follow the head? The contributors to this special thematic issue explore the nature and ground of personal identity, what it would mean to preserve personal identity, given such (...)
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  10. Who Would the Person Be After a Head Transplant? A Confucian Reflection.Lin Bian & Ruiping Fan - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (2):210-229.
    This essay draws on classical Confucian intellectual resources to argue that the person who emerges from a head transplant would be neither the person who provided the head, nor the person who provided the body, but a new, different person. We construct two types of argument to support this conclusion: one is based on the classical Confucian metaphysics of human life as qi activity; the other is grounded in the Confucian view of personal identity as being inseparable from one’s familial (...)
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  11. Kingdoms, Priests and Handmaidens: Bioethics and its Culture.Stephen Richards - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-16.
    Central to this essay is the understanding that varied communities may have an inherent and unrecognised culture of their own and this culture may be detrimental to their core. Bioethics constitute...
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  12. A Defense of Surgical Procedures Regulation.Mattia Andreoletti & Federico Bina - forthcoming - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics:1-14.
    Since the advent of drug regulation in 1962, regulatory agencies have been in the practice of using strict standards to test the safety and efficacy of medical treatments and products. Regulatory agencies, such as the FDA, demand two full-fledged Randomized Clinical Trials demonstrating the safety and effectiveness of drugs to grant its marketing authorization. On the contrary, surgical treatments are left completely unregulated. There are several reasons explaining this difference, and all of them point to the difficulty of conducting well-designed (...)
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  13. The Deception of Certainty: How Non-Interpretable Machine Learning Outcomes Challenge the Epistemic Authority of Physicians. A Deliberative-Relational Approach.Florian Funer - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    Developments in Machine Learning have attracted attention in a wide range of healthcare fields to improve medical practice and the benefit of patients. Particularly, this should be achieved by providing more or less automated decision recommendations to the treating physician. However, some hopes placed in ML for healthcare seem to be disappointed, at least in part, by a lack of transparency or traceability. Skepticism exists primarily in the fact that the physician, as the person responsible for diagnosis, therapy, and care, (...)
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  14. Reports of New Healthcare AI Interventions Should Include Systematic Ethical Evaluations.Wendy A. Rogers, Heather Draper & Stacy M. Carter - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  15. Naturalism, Disease, and Levels of Functional Description.Somogy Varga & David Miguel Gray - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    The paper engages Christopher Boorse’s Bio-Statistical Theory. In its current form, BST runs into a significant challenge. For BST to account for its central tenet—that lower-level part-dysfunction is sufficient for higher-level pathology—it must provide criteria for how to decide which lower-level parts are the ones to be analyzed for health or pathology. As BST is a naturalistic theory, such choices must be based solely on naturalistic considerations. An argument is provided to show that, if BST is to be preserved, such (...)
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  16. The Ethics of Forced Care in Dementia: Perspectives of Care Home Staff.Anne A. Fetherston, Julian Hughes & Simon Woods - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092210979.
    Some care home residents with dementia have the capacity, some do not. Staff may need to make decisions about administering care interventions to someone whom they believe lacks the capacity to consent to it, but also resists the intervention. Such intervention can be termed forced care. The literature on forced care is scant. This study aims to investigate how the ethics of forced care is navigated in practice, through ten semi-structured interviews with staff in 1 care home in the North (...)
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  17. Too Old to Save? COVID‐19 and Age‐Based Allocation of Lifesaving Medical Care.Nancy S. Jecker - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  18. The Many Metaphysical Commitments of Secular Clinical Ethics: Expanding the Argument for a Moral–Metaphysical Proceduralism.Abram Brummett & Jason T. Eberl - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  19. The Many Moral Matters of Organoid Models: A Systematic Review of Reasons.Andrew J. Barnhart & Kris Dierickx - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  20. Agency, Pregnancy and Persons: Essays in Defense of Human Life.Nicholas Colgrove, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger (eds.) - 2022 - Oxford, UK: Routledge.
    This book provides extensive and critical engagement with some of the most recent and compelling arguments favoring abortion choice. It features original essays from leading and emerging philosophers, bioethicists and medical professionals that present philosophically sophisticated and novel arguments against abortion choice. The chapters in this book are divided into three thematic sections. The first set of essays focuses primarily on unborn human individuals--zygotes, embryos and fetuses. In these chapters it is argued, for example, that human organisms begin to exist (...)
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  21. The Routledge Handbook of Feminist Bioethics.Wendy A. Rogers, Catherine Mills, Jackie Leach Scully, Stacy M. Carter & Vikki Entwistle (eds.) - 2022 - Abingdon: Routledge.
    The Routledge Handbook of Feminist Bioethics is an outstanding resource for anyone with an interest in feminist bioethics, with chapters covering topics from justice and power to the climate crisis. Comprising 42 chapters by emerging and established scholars, the volume is divided into six parts: Foundations of Feminist Bioethics Identity and Identifications Science, Technology and Research Health and Social Care Reproduction and Making Families Widening the Scope of Feminist Bioethics The volume is essential reading for anyone with an interest in (...)
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  22. Wrong Question and the Wrong Standard of Proof.Marc Lipsitch - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108320.
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  23. Digital Bioethics: Introducing New Methods for the Study of Bioethical Issues.Manuel Schneider, Effy Vayena & Alessandro Blasimme - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107387.
    The online space has become a digital public square, where individuals interact and share ideas on the most trivial to the most serious of matters, including discussions of controversial ethical issues in science, technology and medicine. In the last decade, new disciplines like computational social science and social data science have created methods to collect and analyse such data that have considerably expanded the scope of social science research. Empirical bioethics can benefit from the integration of such digital methods to (...)
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  24. Treating Workers as Essential Too: An Ethical Framework for Public Health Interventions to Prevent and Control COVID-19 Infections among Meat-processing Facility Workers and Their Communities in the United States.Kelly K. Dineen, Abigail Lowe, Nancy E. Kass, Lisa M. Lee, Matthew K. Wynia, Teck Chuan Voo, Seema Mohapatra, Rachel Lookadoo, Athena K. Ramos, Jocelyn J. Herstein, Sara Donovan, James V. Lawler, John J. Lowe, Shelly Schwedhelm & Nneka O. Sederstrom - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-14.
    Meat is a multi-billion-dollar industry that relies on people performing risky physical work inside meat-processing facilities over long shifts in close proximity. These workers are socially disempowered, and many are members of groups beset by historic and ongoing structural discrimination. The combination of working conditions and worker characteristics facilitate the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Workers have been expected to put their health and lives at risk during the pandemic because of government and industry pressures to keep (...)
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  25. Relationship Between Emotional Intelligence and Ethical Sensitivity in Turkish Nursing Students.Emine Ergin, Arzu Koçak Uyaroğlu & Büşra Altınel - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-11.
    Providing effective care to patients and making the right decisions in difficult working environments depend on moral sensitivity. Emotional intelligence and ethical sensitivity affect nursing care. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between nursing students’ emotional intelligence and ethical sensitivity levels. The research employed a descriptive-correlational design, 201 nursing students studying at a university in the Central Anatolia region, Turkey, participated in the study. Students’ ethical sensitivity was found to be significant. The nursing students received the highest score in (...)
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  26. Political Bioethics.Benjamin Gregg - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    If bioethical questions cannot be resolved in a widely acceptable manner by rational argument, and if they can be regulated only on the basis of political decision-making, then bioethics belongs to the political sphere. The particular kind of politics practiced in any given society matters greatly: it will determine the kind of bioethical regulation, legislation, and public policy generated there. I propose approaching bioethical questions politically in terms of decisions that cannot be “correct” but that can be “procedurally legitimate.” Two (...)
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  27. Engaging the Values Beneath Communication in Treatment Disputes in the Intensive Care Unit.John Seago - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092210944.
    Disputes over life-sustaining treatment between clinicians and patients or their surrogates are common in the intensive care unit and expected to increase in America because of an aging population, shifts in medical training, and trends in popular opinions on end-of-life decisions. Clinicians struggle to effectively communicate the recommendation that withdrawing life-sustaining treatment is appropriate when the burdens of treatment outweigh the benefits. This view seems foreign and unimaginable to surrogates like family members with deeply held values motivate them to insist (...)
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  28. Cultivating Character for Care.Ann Gallagher - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302211010.
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  29. How Moral Neuroenhancement Impacts Autonomy and Agency.Sofie Møller - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  30. Physician Self-Reported Use of Empathy During Clinical Practice.Amber Comer, Lyle Fettig, Stephanie Bartlett, Lynn D’Cruz & Nina Umythachuk - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092210966.
    Objectives The use of empathy during clinical practice is paramount to delivering quality patient care and is important for understanding patient concerns at both the cognitive and affective levels. This study sought to determine how and when physicians self-report the use of empathy when interacting with their patients. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 76 physicians working in a large urban hospital was conducted in August of 2017. Physicians were asked a series of questions with Likert scale responses as well as (...)
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  31. Critical Care Nurses’ Experiences on Dishonesty: A Qualitative Content Analysis.Reza Negarandeh, Mitra Khoobi, Majid Ahmadihedayat & Dougie Marks - forthcoming - Nursing Ethics:096973302110204.
    Background: Providing information to patients is an essential aspect of care. The way in which such information is transmitted is also important and is affected by different variables. The perceptions of dishonest nursing staff have not been sufficiently discussed to date. Aim: The purpose is to explore the reasons for dishonesty in transmitting information to patients. Design and Method: In this qualitative content analysis study, data were collected using semi-structured interviews with Twelve Iranian Critical Care Nurses from January 2020 till (...)
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  32. Utilitarianism on the Front Lines: COVID-19, Public Ethics, and the "Hidden Assumption" Problem.Charles Shaw - forthcoming - Ethics and Bioethics (in Central Europe).
    How should we think of the preferences of citizens? Whereas self-optimal policy is relatively straightforward to produce, socially optimal policy often requires a more detailed examination. In this paper, we identify an issue that has received far too little attention in welfarist modelling of public policy, which we name the "hidden assumptions" problem. Hidden assumptions can be deceptive because they are not expressed explicitly and the social planner (e.g. a policy maker, a regulator, a legislator) may not give them the (...)
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  33. The Hermeneutics of Symptoms.Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    The clinical encounter begins with presentation of an illness experience; but throughout that encounter, something else is constructed from it – a symptom. The symptom is a particular interpretation of that experience, useful for certain purposes in particular contexts. The hermeneutics of medicine – the study of the interpretation of human experience in medical terms – has largely taken the process of symptom-construction to be transparent, focussing instead on how constellations of symptoms are interpreted as representative of particular conditions. This (...)
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  34. IAB Presidential Address: Bioethics, Justice, and Lessons From a Global Pandemic.Vardit Ravitsky - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  35. Environmental Justice and Climate Change Policies.David B. Resnik - forthcoming - Bioethics.
  36. COVID-19 Vaccination Passports: Are They a Threat to Equality?Kristin Voigt - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    In several countries, governments have implemented so-called ‘COVID passport’ schemes, which restrict access to venues such as bars or sports events to those who are vaccinated against COVID-19 and/or exempt vaccinated individuals from public health measures such as curfews or quarantine requirements. These schemes have been the subject of a heated debate. Concerns about inequality have played an important role in the opposition to such schemes. This article highlights that determining how COVID passports affect equality requires a much more nuanced (...)
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  37. Towards A New Model of Global Health Justice: The Case of COVID-19 Vaccines.Nancy S. Jecker, Caesar A. Atuire & Susan D. Bull - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108165.
    This paper questions an exclusively state-centred framing of global health justice and proposes a multilateral alternative. Using the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines to illustrate, we bring to light a broad range of global actors up and down the chain of vaccine development who contribute to global vaccine inequities. Section 1 presents an overview of moments in which diverse global actors, each with their own priorities and aims, shaped subsequent vaccine distribution. Section 2 characterises collective action failures at each phase of (...)
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  38. Non-Accommodationism and Conscientious Objection in Healthcare: A Response to Robinson.Steve Clarke - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108294.
    Michael Robinson takes issue with an ‘argument from voluntariness’ made by several opponents of current practices for managing conscientious objection in healthcare, including Cantor, Stahl and Emanuel, and Schuklenk, whom he characterises as ‘non-accommodationists’. Here I argue that while Robinson is right to oppose the argument from voluntariness, he misunderstands current arrangements for managing CO in healthcare, and he misses the force of the non-accommodationist case against those arrangements. I also argue that despite what he says, Robinson is as much (...)
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  39. Children, Futility and Parental Disagreement: The Importance of Ethical Reasoning for Clinicians in the Paediatric Intensive Care Setting.Chiara Baiocchi & Edmund Horowicz - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092210966.
    The provision of intensive care enables the lives of neonates, infants and children to be sustained or extended in circumstances previously regarded as impossible. However, as well as benefits, such care may confer burdens that resultingly frame continuation of certain interventions as futile, conferring more harm than or any, benefit. Subsequently, clinicians and families in the paediatric intensive care unit are often faced with decisions to withdraw, withhold or limit intensive care in order to act in the best interests of (...)
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  40. Ethics of Recommending Weight Loss in Older Adults: A Case Study.Christine Marie Mills - forthcoming - Clinical Ethics:147775092210966.
    Healthcare professionals may confront ethical issues in practice, particularly when their values conflict with that of their patients or clients. This paper explores an ethical case study in which a dietitian who practices Health at Every Size® has an older adult client who wishes to lose weight. The dietitian believes that losing weight is inappropriate for this client. Using a framework for ethical decision making, this article explores the problem or dilemma, identifies the potential issues involved, discusses the relevant ethical (...)
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  41. Care Relationships and the Autonomy of People with Physical Disabilities.Mauren Alexandra Sampaio & Dirce Bellezi Guilhem - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  42. Personal Responsibility and Transplant Revisited: A Case for Assigning Lower Priority to American Vaccine Refusers.Jacob M. Appel - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):461-468.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 461-468, May 2022.
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  43. Vulnerability in Practice: Peeling Back the Layers, Avoiding Triggers, and Preventing Cascading Effects.Elizabeth Victor, Florencia Luna, Laura Guidry-Grimes & Alison Reiheld - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  44. Mixed‐Methods Exploration of Views on Choice in a University Asymptomatic COVID‐19 Testing Programme.Caitríona Cox, Akbar Ansari, Meredith McLaughlin, Jan W. Scheer, Jennifer Bousfield, Jenny George, Brandi Leach, Sarah Parkinson & Mary Dixon-Woods - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):434-444.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 434-444, May 2022.
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  45. Towards Equitable Genomics Governance in Africa: Guiding Principles From Theories of Global Health Governance and the African Moral Theory of Ubuntu.Nchangwi Syntia Munung, Jantina Vries & Bridget Pratt - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):411-422.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 411-422, May 2022.
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  46. A Theory of BioethicsDavidDeGrazia and JosephMillum, Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2022. 316 Pp. ISBN 9781009011747. $24.99. [REVIEW]Bonnie Steinbock - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (4):476-477.
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  47. Pandemic Bioethics. Gregory Pence. Broadview Press: Peterborough, on, 2021. 256 Pp. Isbn 978‐1‐55481‐521‐0 €22 (Soft Cover). [REVIEW]Justin Bernstein & Pierce Randall - 2022 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (4):472-473.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 472-473, May 2022.
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  48. Catholic Bioethics and Social Justice: Praxis of US Health Care in a Globalized World; The Cry of the Poor: Liberation Ethics and Justice in Health Care.Lorraine Cuddeback-Gedeon - 2022 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 19 (1):173-175.
  49. IRBs and the Protection-Inclusion Dilemma: Finding a Balance.Phoebe Friesen, Luke Gelinas, Aaron Kirby, David H. Strauss & Barbara E. Bierer - forthcoming - American Journal of Bioethics:1-14.
    Institutional review boards, tasked with facilitating ethical research, are often pulled in competing directions. In what we call the protection-inclusion dilemma, we acknowledge the tensions IRBs...
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  50. Ethics and Structure.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2022 - Hastings Center Report 52 (2).
    Hastings Center Report, Volume 52, Issue 2, Page 2-2, March‐April 2022.
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