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  1. Aristotle's Theory of Seed: Seeking a Unified Account.Xinkai Hu - forthcoming - Filosofia Unisinos.
    Aristotle’s theory of seed has occupied a very important place in the history of ancient embryology and medicine. Previous studies have overemphasized, in light of the APo. II method, Aristotle’s definition of seed as male semen. In this paper, I wish to show that there are at least three independent definitions of seed working in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals: seed as male semen, seed as female menstruation and seed as embryo. Those three definitions are mutually exclusive on the one hand, (...)
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  2. Against Nagel - In Favour of a Compound Human Ergon.Juliette Christie - 1996 - Dialogue 38 (2-3):77-82.
    Thomas Nagel argues that Aristotle identifies rationality as the ergon idion of the human being. Against Nagel, I defend a reading of Aristotle which depicts a complex human ergon. This complex identity involves desire. It is in Book X of the Nichomachean Ethics that my understanding of Aristotle's position is clinched.
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  3. Aristotle on Flight: Air as an External Resting Point.Daniel Coren - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):123-138.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s explanation for why and how birds are capable of natural flight. For Aristotle, air is a markedly different external resting point in comparison with water and earth, and nature has designed birds so as to take advantage of the unique way in which air affects the inequality between the pushing downward, that is, the downward force and the resistance. My discussion sheds some light on Aristotle’s anticipation of some aspects of modern fluid dynamics and aerodynamics.
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  4. Neglected Evidence for Aristotle, Historia Animalivm 7(8) in the Works of Ancient Homeric Scholars.Robert Mayhew - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):442-446.
    This brief article aims to supplement Stefan Schnieders's presentation of the evidence for Historia animalium 7—that is, Book 7 according to the manuscript tradition, Book 8 according to Theodore Gaza's rearrangement—having been considered the seventh book of this work in antiquity. This is accomplished through the discussion of two texts not considered by Schnieders, both of them passages commenting on Iliad Book 21: P.Oxy. 221 and Porphyry, Homeric Questions Book 1.
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  5. Mixture, Generation and the First Aporia of Aristotle’s GC 1.10.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2021 - Phronesis 66 (2):139-177.
    This paper concerns the classification of the process of mixture, for Aristotle, and the related issue of the manner in which the ingredients remain present once mixed. I argue that mixture is best viewed as a kind of substantial generation in the context of the GC and, accordingly, that the ingredients do not enjoy the kind of strong presence within a mixture usually attributed to them. To do this, I critically examine the most promising versions of the standard view and (...)
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  6. Review of Johnson. Aristotle on Teleology. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2006 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:37.
    Few ideas are more central to Aristotle’s thought than that of the causal purposiveness of natural things. Few ideas in the Aristotelian corpus are more controverted—whether historically, by early modern natural philosophers seeking to break with Aristotelian science or currently, by modern scholars of ancient philosophy seeking to interpret Aristotle’s physics—than what has come to be called Aristotle’s “teleology” (a term coined in the 18th century, apparently by the German philosopher Christian Wolff). In this ambitious study (derived from the author’s (...)
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  7. Aristotle’s Criticism of Pre-Socratic Natural Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2006 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C), a well know Greek philosopher, physician, scientist and politician. A variety of identifying researches have been written on him. It is therefore a considerable pride for the researcher to write something about him when even mentioning his name and his father's name is a point of prestige in the Greek Language. His name means the preferable sublimity whereas Nicomachus (his father's name) means the definable negotiator. His father's and mother's origin belongs to Asclepiade, the favorite origin in (...)
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  8. Animism, Aristotelianism, and the Legacy of William Gilbert’s De Magnete.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Perspectives on Science 29 (2):157-188.
    William Gilbert’s 1600 book, De magnete, greatly influenced early modern natural philosophy. The book describes an impressive array of physical experiments, but it also advances a metaphysical view at odds with the soon to emerge mechanical philosophy. That view was animism. I distinguish two kinds of animism – Aristotelian and Platonic – and argue that Gilbert was an Aristotelian animist. Taking Robert Boyle as an example, I then show that early modern arguments against animism were often effective only against Platonic (...)
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  9. Telos and Apeiron in Aristotle’s Science of Nature.Thomas Marré - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):105-122.
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  10. Why Did Aristotle Invent the Material Cause ? The Early Development of the Concept of Hê Hylê.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2020 - In Pierre Pellegrin & Françoise Graziani (eds.), L'HÉRITAGE D'ARISTOTE AUJOURD'HUI : NATURE ET SOCIÉTÉ. Alessandria: Editzioni dell'Orso. pp. 59-86.
    I present a developmental account of Aristotle’s concept of hê hylê (usually translated “the matter”), focused the earliest developments. I begin by analyzing fragments of some lost early works and a chapter of the Organon, texts which indicate that early in his career Aristotle had not yet begun to use he hylê in a technical sense. Next, I examine Physics II 3, a chapter in which Aristotle conceives of he hylê not as a kind of cause in its own right, (...)
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  11. Bemerkungen Zum Zoologischen Grundzug von Ökonomie Und Politik Bei Aristoteles.Sergiusz Kazmierski - 2016 - In Ivo De Gennaro, Sergiusz Kazmierski, Ralf Lüfter & Robert Simon (eds.), Wirtliche Ökonomie. Philosophische und dichterische Quellen [Hospitable Economics. Philosophical and Poetic Sources], Volume II, Elementa Œconomica 1.2. Nordhausen, Deutschland: pp. 185-209.
    Wie an Politik I 2 in Verbindung mit anderen Passagen aus dem Corpus Aristotelicum, v.a. aus seinen zoologischen Schriften, gezeigt werden kann, ist die besondere Fähigkeit des Menschen, sich mitzuteilen, nicht ohne seine spezifische Zoologie denkbar. Ebensowenig ist daher die besondere menschliche Art, Haus- und Staatswesen zu bilden, ohne seine zoologischen Besonderheiten vorstellbar. Die menschliche Fähigkeit, sich mitteilen zu können, weist so in seine spezifische Art des Mitseins und eröffnet dadurch das, was er mitzuteilen vermag, z.B. Recht und Unrecht. Im (...)
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  12. Aristotle's De Anima.Paul Shorey - 1901 - American Journal of Philology 22 (2):149.
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  13. Aristotle on Plato's Receptacle.David Keyt - 1961 - American Journal of Philology 82 (3):291.
  14. Misplaced Passages at the End of Aristotle's Physics.Friedrich Solmsen - 1961 - American Journal of Philology 82 (3):270.
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  15. Aristotle's System of the Physical World. A Comparison with His Predecessors.Philip Merlan & Friedrich Solmsen - 1962 - American Journal of Philology 83 (2):202.
  16. Empedocles' Mixture, Eudoxan Astronomy and Aristotle's Connate Pneuma, with an Appendix "General Because First" a Presocratic Motif in Aristotle's Theology.Friedrich Solmsen & Harald A. T. Reiche - 1963 - American Journal of Philology 84 (1):91.
  17. Presuppositions of Aristotle's Physics.George Boas - 1936 - American Journal of Philology 57 (1):24.
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  18. De Motu Animalium.H. B. Gottschalk, Aristotle & Martha Craven Nussbaum - 1981 - American Journal of Philology 102 (1):84.
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  19. Aristotle on Velocity in the Void.Joseph Katz - 1943 - American Journal of Philology 64 (4):432.
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  20. Zeno Beach.Jacob Rosen - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):467-500.
    On Zeno Beach there are infinitely many grains of sand, each half the size of the last. Supposing Aristotle denied the possibility of Zeno Beach, did he have a good argument for the denial? Three arguments, each of ancient origin, are examined: the beach would be infinitely large; the beach would be impossible to walk across; the beach would contain a part equal to the whole, whereas parts must be lesser. It is attempted to show that none of these arguments (...)
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  21. Vergil’s Physics of Bugonia in Georgics 4.Peter Osorio - 2020 - Classical Philology 115 (1):27-46.
  22. Review of: R. Polansky & W. Wians (eds.), Reading Aristotle. Argument and Exposition. [REVIEW]Florian Marion - 2019 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 117:166-169.
    Review of: R. Polansky & W. Wians (eds.), Reading Aristotle. Argument and Exposition, Leiden/Boston, Brill, 2017, in Revue philosophique de Louvain, 117, p. 166-169.
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  23. SIMPLICIUS’ COMMENTARY ON ARISTOTLE - (A.) Lernould (trans.) Simplicius. Commentaire sur la Physique d'Aristote. Livre II, ch. 1–3. (Cahiers de philology 35.) Pp. 234. Villeneuve d'Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 2019. Paper, €26. ISBN: 978-2-7574-2465-0. [REVIEW]Giovanna R. Giardina - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):367-369.
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  24. Aristotle’s Theory of Bodies, by Christian Pfeiffer.Mary Katrina Krizan - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):512-515.
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  25. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (3):285-314.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals, he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31–434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete animal. Using a comparison with (...)
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  26. Nutritive and Sentient Soul in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals 2.5.Sophia M. Connell - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):324-354.
    This paper argues that focusing on Aristotle’s theory of generation as primarily ‘hylomorphic’ can lead to difficulties. This is especially evident when interpreting the association between the male and sentient soul at GA 2.5. If the focus is on the male’s contribution as form and the female’s as matter, then soul becomes divided into nutritive from female and sentient from male which makes little sense in Aristotle’s biological ontology. In contrast, by seeing Aristotle’s theory as ‘archēkinētic’, a process initiated by (...)
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  27. Advancing the Aristotelian Project in Contemporary Metaphysics: A Review Essay.Robert C. Koons - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):435-442.
    In a recent book, Substance and the Fundamentality of the Familiar, Ross Inman demonstrates the contemporary relevance of an Aristotelian approach to metaphysics and the philosophy of nature. Inman successfully applies the Aristotelian framework to a number of outstanding problems in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of physics. Inman tackles some intriguing questions about the ontological status of proper parts, questions which constitute a central focus of ongoing debate and investigation.
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  28. Aristotle's Actual Infinities.Jacob Rosen - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 59.
    Aristotle is said to have held that any kind of actual infinity is impossible. I argue that he was a finitist (or "potentialist") about _magnitude_, but not about _plurality_. He did not deny that there are, or can be, infinitely many things in actuality. If this is right, then it has implications for Aristotle's views about the metaphysics of parts and points.
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  29. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals (those without sight, smell, hearing), he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31-434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete (...)
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  30. Aristotle’s Science of Matter and Motion. By Christopher Byrne. [REVIEW]Errol G. Katayama - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):227-232.
  31. Aristotle Against (Unqualified) Self-Motion.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):363-380.
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  32. Aristotle on Self-Change in Plants.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):33-62.
    A lot of scholarly attention has been given to Aristotle’s account of how and why animals are capable of moving themselves. But no one has focused on the question, whether self-change is possible in plants on Aristotle’s account. I first give some context and explain why this topic is worth exploring. I then turn to Aristotle’s conditions for self-change given in Physics VIII.4, where he argues that the natural motion of the elements does not count as self-motion. I apply those (...)
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  33. Colloquium 2 Genesis and the Priority of Activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics IX.8.Mark Sentesy - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):43-70.
    This paper clarifies the way Aristotle uses generation to establish the priority of activity in time and in being. It opens by examining the concept of genetic priority. The argument for priority in beinghood has two parts. The first part is a synthetic argument that accomplishment is the primary kind of source, an argument based on the structure of generation. The second part engages three critical objections to the claim that activity could be an accomplishment: activity appears to lack its (...)
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  34. Aristotle on the Good of Reproduction.Myrna Gabbe - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):363-395.
    This paper discusses Aristotle’s theory of reproduction: specifically, the good that he thinks organisms attain by reproducing. The aim of this paper is to refute the widespread theory that Aristotle believes plants and animals reproduce for the sake of attenuated immortality. This interpretive claim plays an important role in supporting one leading interpretation of Aristotle’s teleology: the theory that Aristotelian nature is teleologically oriented with a view solely to what benefits individual organisms, and what benefits the organism is its survival (...)
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  35. Aristoteles: Kleine Naturwissenschaftliche Schriften . Uebersetzt von Eugen Rolfes. Pp. x + 158. Leipzig: Meiner, 1924 . 4s. 4d. [REVIEW]L. S. J. - 1925 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 45 (1):152-152.
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  36. Die Philosophie des Aristoteles. Von Dr.Theol. E. Rolfes. Pp. vii + 380. Leipzig, Meiner: 1923. - Aristoteles Lehre vom Schiuse oder Erste Analytik. Pp. x + 209. Lehre vom Beweis oder Zweite Analytik. Pp. xviii + 164. Politik . Pp. xxxi + 341. Neu übersetzt von Dr.Theol. E. Rolfes. Leipzig: Meiner, 1922. - Aristoteles Über die Dichtkunst. Neu übersetzt von Alfred Gudeman. Pp. xxiv + 91. Leipzig: Meiner, 1921. [REVIEW]L. S. J. - 1924 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 44 (1):114-115.
  37. Aristotle's Four Books of Meteorologica.R. G. Bury - 1921 - The Classical Review 35 (3-4):69-69.
  38. Aristotle's Physics. A Revised Text, with Introduction and Commentary. By W. D. Ross. Pp. Xii + 750. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1936. 36s. [REVIEW]D. Tarrant - 1939 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 59 (1):165-165.
  39. Graham Aristotle's Two Systems. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1987. Pp. Xv + 359. £33.00.William Charlton - 1989 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 109:234-235.
  40. Aristotle. De Partibus Animalium I and De Generatione Animalium I . Trans, with Notes by D. M. Balme. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1972. Pp. Vii + 173. £3·50 ; £1·75. [REVIEW]J. S. Wilkie - 1974 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 94:193-194.
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  41. Johansen Aristotle on the Sense-Organs. Cambridge UP, 1998. Pp. Xvi + 304. £37.50. 052158338.Alan Towey - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:192-193.
  42. Aristotle. De motu animalium. Ed. and trans. with interpretive essays by M. C. Nussbaum. Princeton: the University Press. 1978. Pp. xxiii + 430. £18.90.Malcolm Schofield - 1981 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:156.
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  43. Aristotle. La Generazione E la Corruzione. Ed. And Trans. M. Migliori. Naples: Loffredo. 1976. Pp. 289. L 9,600.Rosamond Kent Sprague - 1980 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 100:227-227.
  44. Clark Aristotle's Man: Speculations Upon Aristotelian Anthropology.Oxford: Clarendon. 1975. Pp. Xiv + 240. £6·00.J. Dybikowski - 1976 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 96:186-186.
  45. Aristotle. De Anima. Ed. D. Ross. Oxford: The Clarendon Press. 1961. Pp. Vii + 338. £2 10s. 0d.D. W. Hamlyn - 1963 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:183-184.
  46. Aristotle. Parva Naturalia. A Revised Text Ed. With Introduction and Commentary by Sir David Ross. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1955. Pp. Xi + 355. 40s. [REVIEW]A. L. Peck - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (2):331-332.
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  47. . Paris: ‘Les Belles Lettres’.D. W. Hamlyn - 1968 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 88:166.
  48. A. L. Peck: Aristotle, Historia Animalium. Vol. Ii . Pp. Viii+414 London: Heinemann, 1970. Cloth, £1·25.James Longrigg - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (1):89-90.
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  49. Aristotle's Physics I, II - W. Charlton: Aristotle, Physics, Books I and Ii. Translated with Introduction and Notes. Pp. Xvii+151. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970. Cloth, £2. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (2):200-202.
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  50. A Battle Against Pain? Aristotle, Theophrastus and the Physiologoi in Aspasius, On Nicomachean Ethics 156.14-20.Wei Cheng - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (4):392-416.
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