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  1. Relatable and Attainable Moral Exemplars as Sources for Moral Elevation and Pleasantness.Hyemin Han & Kelsie J. Dawson - forthcoming - Journal of Moral Education.
    In the present study, we examined how the perceived attainability and relatability of moral exemplars predicted moral elevation and pleasantness among both adult and college student participants. Data collected from two experiments were analyzed with Bayesian multilevel modeling to explore which factors significantly predicted outcome variables at the story level. The analysis results demonstrated that the main effect of perceived relatability and the interaction effect between attainability and relatability shall be included in the best prediction model, and thus, were deemed (...)
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  2. What is Good? A Study of Educational Insights in Nicomachean Ethics.Abhijeet Bardapurkar - 2022 - Journal of Human Values 28 (1):11-19.
    Journal of Human Values, Volume 28, Issue 1, Page 11-19, January 2022. This work is a study of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics to characterize the good: the good that features in education and good life. Nicomachean Ethics teaches us that human good is neither in thought/theory, nor in action/practice alone, it is neither an exclusively individual prerogative, nor an outright social preserve. And, human good is impossible without education. The practice of education can neither be isolated nor conceptualized apart from the (...)
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  3. Review of Marta Jimenez, Aristotle on Shame and Learning to Be Good.Howard Curzer - 2022 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  4. The Learner’s Motivation and the Structure of Habituation in Aristotle.Margaret Hampson - 2022 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 104 (3):415-447.
    Moral virtue is, for Aristotle, a state to which an agent’s motivation is central. For anyone interested in Aristotle’s account of moral development this invites reflection on two questions: how is it that virtuous motivational dispositions are established? And what contribution do the moral learner’s existing motivational states make to the success of her habituation? I argue that views which demand that the learner act with virtuous motives if she is to acquire virtuous dispositions misconstrue the nature and structure of (...)
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  5. Aristotle on the nature of ethos and ethismos.Margaret Hampson - 2022 - In Jeremy Dunham & Komarine Romdenh-Romluc (eds.), Habit and the History of Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 37-50.
    That character virtue is produced, according to Aristotle, through a process of moral habituation is a familiar feature of his ethics. And yet our feeling of familiarity with the notions of habit and habituation can engender a like feeling of familiarity with the process Aristotle describes, and encourage us to conceive of this process in an overly narrow way. In this chapter, I examine Aristotle’s notion of ethos and ethismos (habit, habituation) in the Nicomachean Ethics to better understand what Aristotle (...)
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  6. Neither Virtue Nor Vice: Akratic and Enkratic Values in and beyond the Eudemian Ethics.Jozef Müller - 2022 - In Giulio Di Basilio (ed.), Investigating the Relationship Between Aristotle's Eudemian and Nicomachean Ethics. London and New York: Issues in Ancient Philosophy. pp. 137-155.
  7. Ensinando a ser gente: disposição, hábito e educação moral na Ética de Aristóteles.Thaiani Rafaela Wagner - 2022 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Rio Grande Do Sul
  8. Aristotle on the Necessity of Habituation.Margaret Hampson - 2021 - Phronesis 66 (1):1-26.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 2.4 Aristotle raises a puzzle about moral habituation. Scholars take the puzzle to concern how a learner could perform virtuous actions, given the assumption that virtue is prior to virtuous action. I argue, instead, that Aristotle is concerned to defend the necessity of practice, given the assumption that virtue is reducible to virtuous action.
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  9. Review of Marta Jimenez, Aristotle on Shame and Learning to Be Good. [REVIEW]Duane Long - 2021 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 202106.
  10. Shame in Aristotle - (M.) Jimenez, Aristotle on Shame and Learning to Be Good[REVIEW]Gabriela Rossi - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (2):324 - 326.
  11. Aristotle on Shame and Learning to Be Good.Marta Jimenez - 2020 - Oxford University Press.
    This book presents a novel interpretation of Aristotle's account of how shame instils virtue, and defends its philosophical import. Shame is shown to provide motivational continuity between the actions of the learners and the virtuous dispositions that they will eventually acquire.
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  12. Nurture and Parenting in Aristotelian Ethics.Sophia Connell - 2019 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 119 (2):179-200.
    For Aristotle, in making the deliberate choice to incorporate the extensive requirements of the young into the aims of one’s life, people realise their own good. In this paper I will argue that this is a promising way to think about the ethics of care and parenting. Modern theories, which focus on duty and obligation, direct our attention to conflicts of interests in our caring activities. Aristotle’s explanation, in contrast, explains how nurturing others not only develops a core part of (...)
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  13. Imitating Virtue.Margaret Hampson - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):292-320.
    Moral virtue is, for Aristotle, famously acquired through the practice of virtuous actions. But how should we understand the activity of Aristotle’s moral learner, and how does her activity result in the acquisition of virtue? I argue that by understanding Aristotle’s learner as engaged in the emulative imitation of a virtuous agent, we can best account for her development. Such activity crucially involves the adoption of the virtuous agent’s perspective, from which I argue the learner is positioned so as to (...)
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  14. Empeiria and Good Habits in Aristotle’s Ethics.Marta Jimenez - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):363-389.
    The specific role of empeiria in Aristotle’s ethics has received much less attention than its role in his epistemology, despite the fact that Aristotle explicitly stresses the importance of empeiria as a requirement for the receptivity to ethical arguments and as a source for the formation of phronêsis.1 Thus, while empeiria is an integral part of all explanations that scholars give of the Aristotelian account of the acquisition of technê and epistêmê, it is usually not prominent in explanations of the (...)
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  15. Aristotle on Virtue of Character and the Authority of Reason.Jozef Müller - 2019 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 64 (1):10-56.
    I argue that, for Aristotle, virtue of character is a state of the non-rational part of the soul that makes one prone to making and acting on decisions in virtue of that part’s standing in the right relation to (correct) reason, namely, a relation that qualifies the agent as a true self-lover. In effect, this central feature of virtue of character is nothing else than love of practical wisdom. As I argue, it not only explains how reason can hold direct (...)
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  16. Aristóteles: educação moral e a formação do caráter.Rosane Rocha Viola Siquieroli - 2019 - Primordium 3 (5).
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  17. Orthos Logos: a Educação Moral em Aristóteles.Rosane Rocha Viola Siquieroli - 2019 - Dissertation, Ufu, Brazil
  18. Amistad y filosofía según Aristóteles.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2019 - Disputatio. Philosophical Research Bulletin 8:413–426.
    This paper concentrates on friendship as the best context to philosophize. Although Aristotle says that even alone a person could contemplate the truth, it is possible to argue that a philosophical society is indeed necessary for human beings. In every friendship, it is necessary to share certain activities and, at the same time, notice the presence of the friend. In philosophical friendship, the shared activity is philosophy itself and mutual knowledge among friends acquires a peculiar character, because everyone does not (...)
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  19. Aristotle on the Archai of Practical Thought.Jay R. Elliott - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (4):448-468.
  20. Intelecto en acción: Aristóteles y la filosofía como forma de vida.Alejandro Farieta - 2018 - Bogotá, Colombia: Editorial Uniagustiniana.
    This book faces the problem of how is it possible to conceive Aristotelian philosophy as a way of life, and not as a discipline or profession. If there are any of his texts where this concerns are to be found, it is in his practical treatises, in which he defends a philosophy of human affairs. However, Aristotle insists on the fact that philosophy, in its greatest expression, is the first philosophy, to which the idea of contemplation seems to refer to, (...)
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  21. The characterization of the sphere of temperance in EN III.10.Bernardo César Diniz Athayde Vasconcelos - 2018 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 24:207-227.
    Our article deals with Aristotle’s account of the sphere of temperance in the Nicomachean Ethics. The goal is to provide a detailed analysis of NE III.10 in order to identify the difficulties this chapter presents us with and to introduce and discuss the interpretations set forth by the secondary literature. Of special interest to us are Aristotle’s intense dialogue with Plato; the difficulty in understanding touch as the most common of the senses and Aristotle’s severe judgment of the pleasures of (...)
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  22. Virtue and Virtuosity: Xunzi and Aristotle on the Role of Art in Ethical Cultivation.Lee Wilson - 2018 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 30:75–103.
    Christian B. Miller has noted a “realism challenge” for virtue ethicists to provide an account of how the character gap between virtuous agents and non-virtuous agents can be bridged. This is precisely one of Han Feizi’s key criticisms against Confucian virtue ethics, as Eric L. Hutton argues, which also cuts across the Aristotelian one: appealing to virtuous agents as ethical models provides the wrong kind of guidance for the development of virtues. Hutton, however, without going into detail, notes that the (...)
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  23. Imaginative Moral Development.Nicolas Bommarito - 2017 - Journal of Value Inquiry 51 (2):251-262.
    The picture of moral development defended by followers of Aristotle takes moral cultivation to be like playing a harp; one gets to be good by actually spending time playing a real instrument. On this view, we cultivate a virtue by doing the actions associated with that virtue. I argue that this picture is inadequate and must be supplemented by imaginative techniques. One can, and sometimes must, cultivate virtue without actually performing the associated actions. Drawing on strands in Buddhist philosophy, I (...)
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  24. Aristotle on children and childhood.Hallvard Fossheim - 2017 - In Reidar Aasgaard & Cornelia Horn (eds.), Childhood in History: Perceptions of Children in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds. Routledge. pp. 37-55.
  25. O Conflito Moral de Neoptólemo : uma leitura aristotélica da tragédia Filoctetes (EN VII 1146a16-21e 1151b17-22).Angelo Antonio Pires de Oliveira - 2017 - Hypnos 38:72-92.
    Contrapondo-se às interpretações que sobrevalorizam o papel da razão nas escolhas dos fins morais, pretendo resgatar o papel positivo que a virtude do caráter, uma virtude não-racional, pode exercer em tais escolhas. Isto será feito levando em consideração a análise que Aristóteles faz da crise moral de Neoptólemo na tragédia Filoctetes.
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  26. Virtude do Caráter e Phronesis na Ethica Nicomachea.Angelo Antonio Pires De Oliveira - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Campinas, Brazil
    In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle makes the following claims: “the end cannot be a subject of deliberation, but only what contributes to the ends” (NE 1112b33-34) and “virtue makes the goal right, practical wisdom makes the things to- ward the goal right" (NE 1144a7-9). A problem arises from such claims: the ends as- sumed by a moral agent cannot be subject to rational choice. For deliberation, an intel- lectual procedure, is bound to deal with the things that contribute to the (...)
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  27. Practical reason, habit, and care in Aristotle.Juan Pablo Bermúdez - 2016 - Praxis Filosófica 43:77–102.
    Interpretation of Aristotle’s theory of action in the last few decades has tended toward an intellectualist position, according to which reason is in charge of setting the goals of action. This position has recently been criticized by the revival of anti-intellectualism (particularly from J. Moss’ work), according to which character, and not reason, sets the goals of action. In this essay I argue that neither view can sufficiently account for the complexities of Aristotle’s theory, and propose an intermediate account, which (...)
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  28. Harmonia, Melos and Rhytmos. Aristotle on Musical Education.Elena Cagnoli Fiecconi - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (2):409-424.
    In this paper, I reconstruct the reasons why Aristotle thinks that musical education is important for moral education. Musical education teaches us to enjoy appropriately and to recognize perceptually fine melodies and rhythms. Fine melodies and rhythms are similar to the kind of movements fine actions consist in and fine characters display. By teaching us to enjoy and recognise fine melodies and rhythms, musical education can train us to recognize and to take pleasure in fine actions and characters. Thus, musical (...)
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  29. Aspirazione, riflessione e felicità: l’etica della virtù di Julia Annas.Lorenzo Greco - 2016 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 29 (1):173-80.
    In this essay, I offer a survey of Julia Annas’ perspective on virtue ethics. I focus on her most recent work and highlight the role reflection plays in shaping her conception of the virtuous agent. I compare her approach with that of rival moral conceptions, both within and outside virtue ethics, and conclude with a doubt raised from a Humean point of view.
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  30. Aristotle on Becoming Virtuous by Doing Virtuous Actions.Marta Jimenez - 2016 - Phronesis 61 (1):3-32.
    Aristotle ’s claim that we become virtuous by doing virtuous actions raises a familiar problem: How can we perform virtuous actions unless we are already virtuous? I reject deflationary accounts of the answer given in _Nicomachean Ethics_ 2.4 and argue instead that proper habituation involves doing virtuous actions with the right motive, i.e. for the sake of the noble, even though learners do not yet have virtuous dispositions. My interpretation confers continuity to habituation and explains in a non-mysterious way how (...)
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  31. La dimensione comunitaria della formazione filosofica secondo Aristotele.David Torrijos-Castrillejo - 2016 - In Ariberto Acerbi, Francisco Fernández Labastida & Gennaro Luise (eds.), La filosofia come Paideia. Contributi sul ruolo educativo degli studi filosofici. Roma: Armando. pp. 27-34.
    This paper is a study about the social dimension of the philosophical education according to Aristotle. Aristotle is not a individualistic thinker but he understands the philosophical activity in the social context of the friendship.
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  32. Phronesis in Aristotle: Reconciling Deliberation with Spontaneity.Bronwyn Finnigan - 2015 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 91 (3):674-697.
    A standard thesis of contemporary Aristotelian virtue ethics and some recent Heideggerian scholarship is that virtuous behavior can be performed immediately and spontaneously without engaging conscious processes of deliberative thought. It is also claimed that phronēsis either enables or is consistent with this possibility. In the Nicomachean Ethics, however, Aristotle identifies phronesis as the excellence of the calculative part of the intellect, claims that calculation and deliberation are the same and that it is the mark of the phronimos to be (...)
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  33. Aristotle on “Steering the Young by Pleasure and Pain”.Marta Jimenez - 2015 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (2):137-164.
    At least since Burnyeat’s “Aristotle on Learning to Be Good,” one of the most popular ways of explaining moral development in Aristotle is by appealing to mechanisms of pleasure and pain. Aristotle himself suggests this kind of explanation when he says that “in educating the young we steer them by the rudders of pleasure and pain” (Nicomachean Ethics X.1, 1172a21). However, I argue that, contrary to the dominant view, Aristotle’s view on moral development in the Nicomachean Ethics is not mainly (...)
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  34. Mimesis, Friendship, and Moral Development in Aristotle’s Ethics.Andreas Vakirtzis - 2015 - Rhizomata 3 (2):125-142.
    The significance of imitation for moral development during childhood, in Aristotle’s ethics, has been recognized and studied. However, what role does imitation play in the morally mature agent’s character development? In this paper, I argue that moral development is possible for the advanced moral agent, when she imitates her character-friend. But the mature agent’s imitation is of a thoroughly different type than the imitation of the young moral agent; the mature imitation mechanism is selective and interpretative. The agent selects from (...)
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  35. "Los mitos griegos en los medios audiovisuales: propuesta ética para la educación a través de Dédalo e Ícaro", en Villagómez Peñaloza, L.A. (coord.), <Arrebatos de la realidad. Violencia y Psic.>, MÉXICO, Editorial Fénix, 2016, 86 págs.(ISBN 978-607-96852-4-9), pp. 69-86. Villaloza & Villagomez Peñaloza (eds.) - 2015 - Editorial Fénix.
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  36. Review of Howard J. Curzer, Aristotle and the Virtues. [REVIEW]Marta Jimenez - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014 (04).
  37. Aristotle's Philia and Moral Development.Andreas Vakirtzis - 2013 - Philosophical Inquiry 37 (1-2):49-65.
    Several scholars argue that Aristotle's character friendship occurs only between completely virtuous moral agents. Oppositely, others seem to be more skeptical about such an interpretation. Especially John Cooper (1980) has given to us an original and creative understanding of the matter at hand. Particularly, he argues that not only the completely virtuous agents can engage in virtuous friendship; less morally developed agents can do so as well. The key advantage of Cooper’s account is that it allows agents of unequal moral (...)
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  38. Aristotle on Law and Moral Education.Zena Hitz - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:263-306.
    It is widely agreed that Aristotle holds that the best moral education involves habituation in the proper pleasures of virtuous action. But it is rarely acknowledged that Aristotle repeatedly emphasizes the social and political sources of good habits, and strongly suggests that the correct law‐ordained education in proper pleasures is very rare or non‐existent. A careful look at the Nicomachean Ethics along with parallel discussions in the Eudemian Ethics and Politics suggests that Aristotle divided public moral education or law‐ordained habituation (...)
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  39. Boa educação e busca pelos princípios no Livro I da Ética Nicomaquéia (EN) de Aristóteles.Priscilla Spinelli - 2012 - Dissertatio 36:277-297.
    Buscando apresentar uma interpretação para EN I 4 1095a31-b13, este artigo defende que a digressão nela feita por Aristóteles pretende caracterizar a investigação recém iniciada como promissora, opondo-a, ainda que não explicitamente, ao modo rígido socrático-platônico de fazer Ética ou Política. Para tanto, propõe-se uma interpretação pouco usual do termo que como o princípio buscado e não como ponto de partida da investigação. Recusa-se igualmente ver na passagem mencionada uma referência ao modo ou etapas de aquisição de virtude moral ou (...)
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  40. How Aristotle’s Theory of Education Has Been Studied in Our Century.Koji Tachibana - 2012 - Studia Classica 3:21-67.
  41. Exatidão e objetivo prático na Ética Nicomaquéia de Aristóteles.Priscilla Tesch Spinelli - 2011 - In Alfredo Storck & Raphael Zillig (eds.), Aristóteles: ensaios de ética e metafísica. pp. 41-62.
  42. Método e Justificação Moral em Aristóteles: Ética Eudêmia I.6-9 e Ética Nicomaquéia I.1-5.Inara Zanuzzi - 2011 - In Alfredo Storck & Raphael Zillig (eds.), Aristóteles: ensaios de ética e metafísica. Linus Editores. pp. 11-40.
  43. Ronna Burger, Aristotle’s Dialogue with Socrates. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2010 - Rivista di Filosofia 101 (1):119-120.
    In order to understand the Gricean "logic of conversation" that underlies the Nicomachean Ethics, Burger believes it necessary to identify the audience to which the work is addressed: this is the audience of men and citizens who have received a good education, that is, have learned the virtues through habit, but have doubts about the content of the education received, that is, about the beautiful and the just. Aristotle proposes on the one hand to give them reasons to defend and (...)
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  44. Conhecer, legislar e educar: A filosofia das coisas humanas na Ética Nicomaquéia de Aristóteles.Priscilla Tesch Spinelli - 2010 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Rio Grande Do Sul
  45. Da Ação à Habituação: a finalidade poiética da ação na Ética Aristotélica.Débora Mariz - 2007 - Dissertation, Ufmg, Brazil
  46. Teaching Nature: Natural Virtue and Practical Wisdom in the Nicomachean Ethics.Yancy Hughes Dominick - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (1):103-111.
    Aristotle's account of virtue faces two dangers: the account appears circular, and the text seems to suggest that virtue is relative. Virtue sets the ends for practical wisdom. Without practical wisdom, though, one lacks 'real virtue.' Virtue and practical wisdom appear to depend upon each other. Further, habituation is the source of virtue. Virtue appears to depend upon one's training; virtue looks relative. The concept of 'natural virtue' offers an escape from these difficulties. Virtue and practical wisdom, though related, are (...)
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  47. Habituation as mimesis.Hallvard J. Fossheim - 2006 - In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  48. Ação Ética e Virtude Cívica em Aristóteles.Marisa Lopes - 2004 - Dissertation, University of São Paulo, Brazil
  49. Moral Rules, Utilitarianism and Schizophrenic Moral Education.Kevin Mcdonough - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 26 (1):75-89.
    R. M. Hare has argued for and defended a ‘two-level’, view of moral agency. He argues that moral agents ought to rely on the rules of ‘intuitive moral thinking’ for their ‘everyday’ moral judgments. When these rules conflict or when we do not have a rule at hand, we ought to ascend to the act-utilitarian,‘critical’ level of moral thinking. I argue that since the rules at the intuitive level of moral thinking necessarily conflict much more often than Hare supposes, and (...)
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  50. Therapeutic Arguments: Epicurus and Aristotle.Martha Nussbaum - 1986 - In Malcolm Schofield & Gisela Striker (eds.), The Norms of Nature: Studies in Hellenistic Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 31–74.
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